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This inviting, unpretentious Durbanville estate scores on so many levels. That it has managed to fend off suburban creep (which had already reached its boundaries decades ago) is something to celebrate. That the clever Parkers have managed to maintain the original cellar, the ringmuur and slave bell, the ambience of a bygone era are equally important. (the farm was granted by Simon van der Stel in 1698 and named Tygerberg)

And the fact that, along with the lesser-known cultivars that the cellar has been producing (barbera, gewürztraminer) and sauvignon blanc, the winemaking trio have now added a cab to their ranges, rounding out the choices nicely.

To start with the cabernet sauvignon 2015, this is a pleasing example of modern cab-making, easy on the palate, yet with plenty of body, and a delicious freshness. Described as full-bodied, but I found it less so than many others, making it suitable for summer drinking, and as a good partner for fare other than red meat – a mushroom burger for example.

Juicy tannins, a smooth finish, and plenty of lightly spiced berry flavours add up to a well-balanced whole. The grapes came from 17-year-old bush vines, and the wine was aged in French oak for 10 months.

Priced at between R75 and R79 it’s even more appealing to stock up with a case or two as its sure to improve over the next year or two.

The 2016 vintage of sauvignon blanc was a wine I enjoyed very much – firstly because it is not searingly zesty, so no antacid tablets were required. I also loved the wide spectrum of aromas that greeted my nose whenever I unscrewed the cap – some verdant, a little green fig, and far more granadilla and other tropical fruit . These also showed on the palate, but occasional wafts of that distinctive Durbanville verdancy.

This multi-layered wine is sourced from berries from seven separate blocks of dry-land vineyards, ranging in age from 24 down to 10 years old.

This is a most companionable sauvignon, good for an aperitif or partner to summer salads, seafood and poultry. As one of the first Durbanville farms to present their award-wining sauvignon blanc in 1988 – now the region’s rallying cry – Altydgedacht’s version is an essential label on visitor itineraries. And well-priced at around R75.

 

Although gewürztraminer has grown in popularity – thanks perhaps because of its affinity with Thai and other South-east Asian cuisine – but its still fairly uncommon, and the Atltydgedacht gewurz is even more unusual as its made in the style of its European home, Alsace, that is dry rather than the off-dry vintages of other Cape cousins.

This 2015 vintage, produced from bush vines with an average age of 15 years, has just collected gold from the 2016 Michelangelo Awards.  Floral and spice on the nose, and the characteristic combo of rose petals and lychees, is followed by more of the same on the palate, balanced with a crispness and mineral hint that add to its charm. Some will find it an elegant aperitif that offers something more than conventional summer whites, others will pair it with spicy fare with great satisfaction. Expect to pay about R95.

 

 

 

 

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Perhaps it’s only when you have taken part in an organic certification audit that you begin to realise the lengths wine farmers and producers need to go to to obtain that international certification.

Earlier this month I was lucky enough to sit in on such an audit, and one that had particular significance for both the farmer – Patricia Werdmuller von Elgg – and one of the auditors! But let me set the scene…

If you wish to label your wines as organic, you need to have your farm and cellar certified by one of the international certification organizations. One of these is SGS, an enormous global group which certifies many manufactured as well as natural products. Because of the limited number of serious organic farmers in South Africa, SGS recently appointed a German company specialising in certifying organic agriculture to conduct the final audit and issue the certificates.

Hout Baai farm is a beautiful boutique wine farm just outside McGregor, in a high valley that looks onto the Sonderend mountains which surround it. From the owner’s terrace sweeping views over vines take the eye toward Die Galg – the saddle at the end of the “road to nowhere” - which is really a high meeting place for hikers and travellers who revel in the protea-rich fynbos which cloaks the terrain.

The picture-perfect farm has been certified as fully organic since 2005. This year Hout Baai was chosen by the certification team as an example of just how an organic farm should look and operate with a place for everything and everything in its place. The audit was particularly important as not only was the resident SGS auditor conducting the checking, but the LACON international auditor was present, overseeing the process, and both were under the eagle eye of DAkkS, the German accreditation body for that country’s Federal Republic.

The inspection date for this three-tier audit was set for mid-July, but the three arrived in Mcregor a day ahead of schedule. They settled into the office where the local representative of the certification body started her work with a long list of questions, which needed not only oral answers but proof by way of reams of paperwork. Pat Werdmuller possesses more files than I have ever seen on a farm, where delivery notes, invoices, statements, receipts and printouts provide years of proof of transactions with approved service and material providers. These were hauled out on demand, as they worked their way through how water is tested, how pipes are cleaned, what fertilizers are used. Records of purchase of guano, seaweed and donkey manure were checked then questions turned to frequency of their application and in what concentrate?

Moving to harvest time, when grape picking machines were hired, questions were asked about the possibility of their bringing in unwanted residue of non-organic matter. They are delivered the day before, replied farm manager Del Jones, “so our guys can scrub and wash them down, ready for harvesting which started at 3.30am."

If there is any doubt about dates, the diary is consulted – this set of annual volumes, dating back to when the farm started operations – is filled with daily entries of chores completed, indoors and out, accompanied by photographs as way of proof.

The second half of the audit took the form of a tour of the farm, as the visitors were shown firebreaks, and buffer trees along boundaries (to limit the chance of non-organic sprays drifting over from neighbouring farms). The approved korog, a wheat-like grass planted between the vine rows to provide a nutrient-rich mulch was starting to show green and pruning of the sauvignon blanc vines was under way , each row numbered (and named after an animal or bird that frequents the farm). Del showed the inspectors the sizeable hole dug by a friendly anteater which had these Germans looking a little bewildered. She also pointed out the camera traps which record the visits of caracals, jackals, hares and antelope, as this farm is as much of a nature reserve as it is a wine grape farm.

The compost plant and the worm farm were duly inspected, and then the stores and workshop revealed just how diligently tools are looked after and kept in their place. The farm labourers’ wendy house – cosily furnished with places for both wet and dry weather uniforms and footwear and sporting refreshment facilities – was duly admired and also noted were the required warning signs and notices detailing safety and health information both inside and outside buildings and machinery.

It came as no surprise to any of us that Hout baai farm passed inspection with flying colours and was thanked by SGS for their faultless presentation and co-operation.

Since that day I have been thinking about the number of organic wine and grape producers listed in the latest edition of the SA wine industry directory, which I received recently. In this useful compendium, published annually by WineLand media, a total of 38 organic growers and cellars are listed. According to one Western Cape producer, who shall be nameless at this stage, only three of these are certified organic. While I have not trawled through those 38 to see if they have included details of international certification in their Platter entries (if, indeed, they are all listed in Platter), it does bring up the vexed question of some producers labelling their wines as “organic” without having been certified.

“We’re all organic these days!” was a cheerful comment from one (non-organic) farmer and winemaker. Many would beg to differ.    

Those who are spending inordinate amounts of time and money to transform their farms and cellars to comply with the exacting demands of global organic auditors do so, of course, of their own free will. But it’s unsurprising they also grit their teeth in frustration at the lack of monitoring and control over those who are benefitting from the green and environmentally-conscious consumer through fraudulent labelling.

Even if farms grow grapes and produce wine organically, only those certified by an internationally accredited body – accompanied by a seal of this organisation – are entitled to label their wines as organic. However, some producers who follow organic principles in every respect choose not to be certified, because of the expensive, labour- intensive, regular, obstructive and lengthy inspections.                                                  

And to further muddy the waters, SA producers are allowed, I am told, to state on bottle labels that their wine was produced from organically grown grapes. And, what about the cellars who produce a range of organic wines alongside non-organic …

At which stage, it seems high time for a glass or two of enjoyable wine, made from organically grown and certified grapes in an organically certified cellar. Make mine a Solara sauvignon blanc. Cheers!

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A varied lineup of events as winter gives way to a green and glorious spring!

 

Benguela on Main restaurant is offering a five-course Christmas dinner on Saturday July 30 . Chef Jean Delport is including treats like smoked breast of goose on his menu, which costs R540 a head. Pair your meal with Benguela Cove wines, and Somerset West residents can enjoy a complimentary drive service to and from the restaurant. For more information or to make a reservation to avoid disappointment, visit the website, call 087 357 0637 or email onmain@benguelacove.co.za

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 Steenberg’s Cool Runnings charity trail run takes place through the Constantia vineyards on Saturday August 6. Choose from a 5 or 10km loop. All proceeds to the Mdzananda Vet Clinic in Khayelitsha, a community project that provides quality care for ill and abandoned animals. Finish with a glass of Steenberg sparkling sauvignon blanc and follow with a free wine tasting if you wish. A Mdzananda Vet Donation Box will be available prior to the race where leashes, blankets, dog or cat food and other pet items can be dropped into.The entry fee is R130 per trail runner, R50 per teen between the ages of 12-17, while children under 12 have free entry. Registration opens at 7am outside the Bistro1682 Restaurant. Walkers are welcomed. The briefing takes place 15-minutes ahead of the race at 8am. Pre-booking is essential and can be done online at www.quicket.co.za.

 

Bottelary Hills Wine Route ‘Pop Up’ Lunch

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Savour a slow-cooked Sunday pork lunch with chef Bertus Basson on August 14 at Groenland estate when he will present a three-course lunch that smokes, sears and sizzles. The fires will be lit and guests can enjoy Bottelary Hills wine ahead of their meal. Lunch costs R350 a head, including a wine tasting and glass of wine per course. Book through www.wineroute.co.za or Tel: (021) 886 8275 or marketing@wineroute.co.za

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Nedbank Cape Winemakers Guild Auction Showcase of rare, individual wines

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This popular annual event takes place in Cape Town on Thursday, 18 August at the CTICC from 6pm and in Johannesburg on Wed August 24 at the Atrium, Nedbank Sandton at 6pm. Tickets cost R250 which includes a tasting glass.

Wine enthusiasts cantaste these unique collectors’ wines crafted exclusively in small volumes for the 2016 Cape Winemakers Guild Auction by the Guild’s 47 members.Members of the Guild will also be presenting some of their acclaimed offerings sold under their own labels. Guests can also bid on rare signed bottles from previous Guild auctions during the Silent Auction. Founded in 1999, the Development Trust seeks to transform the wine industry by educating, training and empowering young talent through initiatives such as the Protégé Programme, a highly acclaimed mentorship scheme for upcoming winemakers and viticulturists.Tickets can be purchased via www.webtickets.co.za

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“WE LOVE WINE” FEST RETURNS TO CAPEGATE 

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If Calling northern suburbs winelovers! Just ahead of spring, head to Capegate Shopping Centre for a great weekend wine fest, taking place from 5 - 9pm on Friday August 26 and from 12 noon to 6pm on Saturday 27th.

 

 

Festival visitors can taste and buy more than 100 wines directly from the wineries, which include large producers with well-known brands and smaller boutique and family-owned wineries, giving a taste of the best of South Africa’s winelands in one venue.

 

The Cape Wine Academy is presenting a wine theatre (Three sessions on Friday and four sessions on Saturday) with fun tastings and pairings on the programme at set times.

 

Participating wineries include: Alexanderfontein/Ormonde, Arendskloof/Eagle’s Cliff, Beyerskloof Wines, Biocape Wines, Bonnievale Cellar, Diemersfontein Wines, Dieu Donnè Vineyards, Deux Frères Wines, Du Toitskloof Wines, Edgebaston, Eerstehoop Wines, Fledge & Co, Groenland, Imbuko Wines, La Couronne Wine Estate, MWS, Orange River Cellars, Overhex Wines International, Perdeberg Winery, Peter Bayly Wines, Stellenbosch Hills, Villiera Wines, Villiersdorp Cellar, Yonder Hill Wines.

 

The Pebbles Project, which looks after disadvantaged children, especially those impacted by alcohol, is the charity beneficiary of the festival and will be present to spread their message and raise funds and awareness.

 

Tickets from the door or through www.quicket.co.za  cost R70 pp (Includes a branded tasting glass) Bookings for the CWA theatre sessions can be made at the ticket office.

 

For up to date information, visit www.capegatecentre.co.za

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Bot River hosts blooming nice Spring Weekend

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Enjoy a relaxed weekend in the Overberg from September 2 – 4 during the annual fest hosted by the winemaking community. The region features 11 wine farms, each of which will offer attractions ranging from farm fare, olive oils, fine wines and local talent. Attractions include sausage-making course at Luddite, oysters and bubbles from Genevieve MCC, fynbos hikes at Paardenkloof, lunch at Wildekrans and at Gabrielskloof. Plenty to amuse the small fry as well. Farms will be open from 10am to 4pm. Tickets (weekend pass) cost R100 and obtainable from www.quicket.co.za .For more information on the Bot River Spring Weekend 2016 contact Melissa Nelsen at Cell: 083 302 6562 or email Melissa@genevievemcc.co.za.

 

MIKI CIMAN OF LA MASSERIA INTRODUCES SMALLER CHEESE MAKERS

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Be it gorgonzola, pecorino, fontina, mozzarella, provolone, brie, chèvre, blue or cheddar, the Say Cheese! Artisan Cheese Fair will celebrate all things cheese on 24 and 25 September 2016 at the Italian Club, Milnerton. THE event will bring together artisan cheesemakers, cheese lovers, bakers, brewers and visitors. Says Ciman, “The Fair will allow guests to appreciate every step of the farm-to-table process of cheese making, while highlighting the extraordinary local talent we have in this field. Chefs will take part and wine will be on sale. Tickets will be on sale at the door, at R80 for adults and R30 for children from 11 – 18. Children under 10 go in free.For further information, please email Kiki at saycheesefair@gmail.com or phone Elize Nel on 072 795 4214.

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A CULINARY JOURNEY OF SOUTH AFRICAN INDIGENOUS FOODS [compiled] by Kgaladi Thema-Sethoga and Ursula Moroane-Kgomo. Published by Indiza Co-operative and Modjaji Books. 2015.

 

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Myrna Robins enjoyed the gastronomic trip through our provinces, but questions the fare included in one of the chapters.

Those following western diets may gulp at thought of a snack of salted stinkbugs fried in butter, while others – who spend as little time as possible in the kitchen – may appreciate the Swati dish Indakala,or boiled,salted peanuts. Both can be found in the second edition of a compilation of our indigenous dishes, following on the original, published in 2000 through the CSIR.

The new and intriguing collection of heritage recipes from 11 ethnic groups across South Africa, reveals that much of the fare is also contemporary, as current generations of rural cooks continue to use local ingredients and traditional recipes to feed their families.

IndiZA Foods is a Pretoria-based company headed by MD Kgaladi Thema-Sethoga and Operations Director Ursula Moroane-Kgomo, both high-powered businesswomen with degrees in food science, business management and considerable experience in the food industry. Both are also passionate about the preservation of indigenous culinary cultures, women empowerment and rural development. Their joint enthusiasm resulted in the publication of this worthy addition to our traditional culinary literature.

Women in the rural communities were invited to submit recipes for the food they cook daily: These reveal simple fare using local ingredients, occasionally enlivened by stock cubes, seasonings, and items like margarine. Several high schools were also involved in the project.

The compilers started in North West, with Tswana dishes and went on to Mpumalanga where Ndebele and Swati specialities were hunted down. The Free State yielded Sotho staple fare and the northern province of Limpopo saw recipes collected from Tsonga, Pedi and Venda cuisines. In the Eastern Cape the Xhosa gastronomic heritage was celebrated and Kwa –Zulu Natal presented Zulu menus. From the Western Cape comes a listing described as Khoisan recipes and the final grouping is Afrikaans marked, somewhat strangely, as centred in Gauteng.

The dishes are, as one would expect, simple, largely straightforward renderings of grains, legumes and leaves, gourds and tubers, sparked by indigenous fruits and enlivened by worms and insects. Beef and chicken feature occasionally. There is not a single seafood recipe in this collection.

Perhaps because of their (comparatively) exotic nature, I enjoyed browsing through the cuisines of the northern groups in particular: Among the Pedi recipes is one labelled baobab-fruit yoghurt, a good start to the day, while Venda cooks lift their protein intake with Mashonzha (mopani worms and peanuts) and Thongolifha (stinkbugs fried in butter ). Several species of Morogo, or wild leaves are used, including Pigweed or Amarinth, Blackjack, Spider plant, pumpkin, and wild jute. Breads are uncommon, but the Tswana make Diphaphata, a flatbread using wheat flour, Ndebele cooks use brown bread flour for their steamed bread, while others are based on mealie meal. Desserts are almost non-existent although there’s a Sotho recipe for bottling peaches in sugar syrup.

I contacted the compilers to ask why Gauteng was used as a source for Afrikaans recipes and was told that they invited several groups in the Western and Northern Cape to take part, without success, so eventually resorted to finding them from Gauteng-based Afrikaners. The recipes are authentic Cape cuisine, dishes that have become South African classics.

I gazed, somewhat incredulously, at the pictures and recipes in the Khoisan section, pages where I expected to find items like shellfish, venison, ghaap, sour figs, veldkool, waterblommetjies, and perhaps drinks based on milk. Instead, there’s a Greek-style salad with feta and olives, a caramel pud and a standard white bread recipe. Liver and onions and a mutton potjie (with red wine and packet soup powder) could just pass muster but there is virtually nothing that says “Khoisan” or “Khoi-khoin” in this mini-collection. The recipes were sourced from a group of cooks in Vredendal, and I contacted one of the contributors to ask her how these came to be regarded as Khoisan. Freda Wicomb is the housekeeper at a local boarding school, and is a popular and capable cook, but she had no answer, saying this was how she cooked.

Khoisan, referring to two distinct groups of early South African inhabitants, is a term that should not be applied to their cuisines, as they were very different. The Bushmen, or San were hunter-gatherers while the Khoi were herders. The latter group’s culinary and cultural heritage has been well researched, by fundis such as Dr Renata Coetzee whose brilliant book Kukumakranka presents an exhaustive discussion on the subject. Ingredients used in the past can still be found today, and cooks of both Griqua and Nama descent use veldkos in their potjies, and make askoek, potbrood and vetkoek, as did their forbears.

I suggested that the compilers also contact Chef Shaun Schoeman of Solms Delta’s Fyndraai restaurant, whose Heritage menu includes Khoe-Khoen breads, waterblommetjie soup and desserts starring herbs like buchu, for their next edition.

Kgaladi Thema-Sethoga assures me this section will be more authentic and will also include Cape Malay cuisine. Sadly we will have to wait until 2024 for the new edition.

Meanwhile, this title, illustrated with photographs of many of the recipes, is well-indexed and includes information on many of the ingredients unknown to western cooking. The book is endorsed by the SA Chefs Association and supported by the Department of Arts and Culture.

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Victorian wine cellar at Mont Rochelle

 

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Great to see winemaker Dustin Osborne back in the mountainside cellar of Mont Rochelle. Pretty sure I recognised one or two of the staff at the Country Kitchen as well; if they were there seven years ago, then I am probably right in thinking I met them when gathering information on this unique farm for my Franschhoek Food cookbook.

Champagne was its first name, given to this picturesque stretch by Abraham de Villiers in 1694. It changed to an equally positive Goedehoop more than a century later, finally was christened Mont Rochelle by a 20th century descendant, Graham de Villiers when he acquired it. Earlier this century then owners of hotel and vineyards, Erwin Schnitzler and Miko Rwayitare merged the two to create Mont Rochelle hotel and Mountain vineyards, and newly appointed winemaker Dustin Osborne started producing some memorable reds, one of which is the farm’s flagship red blend today.

Although Franschhoek is a sophisticated village growing increasingly used to foreigners buying bits and pieces, the acquisition of the estate by Virgin Limited Edition collection, and Richard Branson in particular, caused a buzz, which died down while renovations were undertaken at the hotel and gourmet restaurant, and at the rustic Country Kitchen and picturesque cellar.

The latter two venues have not changed much – the 150 year-old-cellar, a former fruit packshed, is as appealing as ever, although Dustin is happier with new flooring and updated machinery. The restaurant, open to terrace and lawns lining a big dam, is still relaxed, serving deli-type fare inside and out, along with picnics.

During a recent visit, a handful of wine writers started their tasting in the cellar, with a charming sauvignon blanc 2015, grapes from the farm’s 22 -year-old vineyards, the fresh wine with subtle fruit lent complexity by 10% semillon and 2and half % viognier. Well-balanced and a great buy at R85.

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Osborne has long been a champion chardonnay maker, and his latest, Mont Rochelle’s 2015 chardonnay is as good as any I remember. It’s elegant, fresh, with tangible minerality, full-bodied, with a long finish. Limited edition from vines planted in ’94, just over half barrel-matured, this is equally delicious as an aperitif or complementing voguish salads and well-bred poultry. We paired

[Caption: Dustin Osborne, Enrico Jacobs and Jenny Prinsloo in picnic mode] Photograph: Shantelle Visser

it with an inspired cauliflower and vanilla risotto – memorable. The wine is also reasonably priced at R100 from farm.

More good news is the launch of an easy-drinking red, Little Rock Rouge 2014, a cab-based blend with merlot and splashes of mourvèdre and petit verdot adding aroma and flavour to a vibrant, enjoyable wine with smooth tannins. Along with its 2015 white counterpart, not yet released, these cost R72 each.

During Dustin’s first stint at the farm he created a fine syrah-based blend named Miko in honour of former owner the late Miko Rwayitare. This flaghip 2009 vintage wine, intense, complex, and well-balanced with dark fruit, spice and savoury undertones, is showing well and is an impressive introduction to the potential of the farm’s terroir.

Our little group had moved through cellar to lawns to tasting cellar to terrace, where we teamed this vinous star with tender venison on sweet potato. Dustin then produced a number of aged cabs which had been discovered under a floor in the adjoining manor house during renovations and an informal vertical tasting commenced, starting off with the ’96 vintage… A few of these may be added to the cellar stock for those seeking museum class reds.

 

We did not see the hotel or more formal Miko restaurant during our visit but heard that the hotel is just about full until Easter, with bookings for weddings increasing nicely. What impressed me at the winery and Country Kitchen was the informality, the friendly yet efficient service, and an atmosphere that is far from stiff or grand. One gets the impression that Branson, having appointed good staff, is content to leave his estate in capable hands. Global visitors can now move from his private game reserve, Ulusaba, in the north of South Africa to our incomparable winelands, for a holiday that can compete with the best on the planet.

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We all knew that Kleine Zalze's new cellarmaster had big boots to fill, as he took over from Johan Joubert. Alastair Rimmer's maiden chenin blanc and chardonnay are both ample, enjoyable proof that he will be carrying on the cellar's impressive reputation for over-delivery on quality and pure enjoyment with a range of wines that have attracted strings of awards both here and internationally.

The farm's Vineyard Selection chenin blanc 2015 follows in the tradition of a beautifully balanced meld of fruit with structure lent from subtle oak. Enough acidity to keep everything fresh, ideal late summer wine for both aperitifs and al fresco fare, but can safely be kept for a few years as well. A very good buy at R77.

In similar style, the Vineyard Selection chardonnay 2015, selling for R80 from cellar door is a fine example of Rimmer's talent: both Stellenbosch and Robertson grapes were sourced for this wine, which spent seven months in oak before blending and bottling. The citrus, pear and stone fruit, with apple providing a floral note, fulfil chardonnay fans' expectations, there's a mineral core, and overall elegance which combines to make this a classic with complexity that should develop further if cellared.

In best Kleine Zalze tradition, these constitute another pair of winners.

 

 

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Rose--Ken-F-Petit-Ros.jpgINb2ap3_thumbnail_Saronsberg-rose.jpgb2ap3_thumbnail_Muratie-Lady-Alice-Brut-Ros.jpg THE PINK AND LOVING IT

 

The focus has been on rosé recently,as these wines are promoted for Valentines day – or weekend as it is this year. I’ve been sampling enjoyable examples while putting together a story for the national lifestyle pages of the Independent group. And, doing it during a heatwave made me appreciate the charms of a well -chilled pink, particularly those with some backbone along with berry flavours.

I am sure that the first Rickety Bridge rosé fest on Saturday the 13th is going to be a sellout – the attractions are wide-ranging and the heatwave should be past its worst, according to predictions. It’s been a while since I tasted examples of their winemaker, Wynand Grobler’s craft, but I have long regarded him as one of the valley’s most talented – and his Foundation Stone rosé (shiraz/Grenache/mourvèdre) and his scintillating NV Cap Classique brut rosé confirm my opinion.

Meanwhile, up the Franschhoek pass to La Petite Ferme, that perennially popular destination for thousands of repeat visitors, now under new Swiss ownership. There’s a new winemaker too, but the 2015 rosé, a largely merlot affair with a dash of sauvignon blanc, is still a product of the Dendy-Youngs. This salmon-tinted summer charmer presents an aroma of rose petal, with berry and cinnamon flavours, with a little sauvignon zest. It finished dry on the palate.

Staying in the Franschhoek valley, Vrede en Lust's enjoyable dry rose, named  Jess, has become a firm favourite in the Vrede en Lust range. Named after the owner's eldest daughter, this crisp wine with its berry and melon notes is a blend of mostly pinotage, with some shiraz and a dash of grenache.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Glenrose-3rd-attempt.jpgThe L’Avenir team from Stellenbosch is not content to produce admirable conventional pinotage, but has added a fine pinotage rosé to the range, its patrician status emphasized by an unique bottle featuring a protea-shaped punt. Glenrosé is made in the Provencal style, its nose of rose petals and strawberry and citrus ahead of a crisp, dry but fruity flavours on the palate, along with a mineral presence. This top of the range example sells for R200. b2ap3_thumbnail_Glenrose-3rd-attempt.jpg

 

 

Turning to my adopted wine region, there are two rosés that I strongly recommend to visitors heading Robertson  way soon: Tanagra’s superb example produced from cab franc has just one fault, and that is there isn’t enough of it. The other is the 2015 rosé from Quando, Fanus Bruwer’s boutique cellar near Bonnievale. He use mourvèdre for this charmer.

I also enjoyed Saronsbergs all-shiraz rosé from their Provenance range. Cellarmaster Dewaldt Heyns specializes in shiraz, among other reds, and this offers a light-hearted aside, complete with sculptor Angus Taylor’s Earth Mother on the label. Tulbagh has acquired a major red wine player with the establishment of this art-filled estate.

One would hardly know where to start when contemplating pinks from the vast Stellenbosch region, but for good value for consistent quality, the dry, fruity and flavour-packed rosé in Ken Forrester’s Petit range is ready to complement many a late summer al fresco meal.

When it comes to rosé Cap Classique bruts, I always enjoy Allee Bleue’s, the NV from Graham Beck and have heard great reports about Webersburg’s NV pinot noir/pinotage brut. Finally, its been a long time since I tasted it, but if memory serves me well, the patrician Lady Alice all-pinot, MCC from Muratie, which comes complete with tales of memorable early 20th century parties, is a bubbly to consider.

A word of thanks to those marketing colleagues who obtained rosé samples for me at such short notice – Posy, Nicolette, Melissa, hugely appreciated.

Whatever fare you’re planning for the coming weekend it’s likely that a crisp pink will pair well. Picnics, salads, sushi, shellfish, salmon, berry finales, you name it, rosé will enhance it.

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Posted by on in Restaurants

 

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It is one of the oldest farms in the Durbanville area, but it’s only recently that visitors, diners and winelovers are being invited to discover the joys awaiting them at this venue. Celebrating its long history, Andre and Ronelle Brink, fourth generation family owners, are marking the 320th anniversary of Groot Phesantekraal with the new vintages of their range of wines, along with a renovated tasting room where guests are invited to sniff various spices, herbs and  teas to awaken their senses. Therre’s also a restaurant that occupies a mid-18th century stable, offering fine country fare of breakfast and lunch along with a Saturday brunch.

Having recently tasted some of the wines, it was good to get an update on two of their impressive releases, the 2017 sauvignon blanc and the 2015 cabernet sauvignon.

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To start with the white, Durbanville is renowned for sauvignon blanc and this, made by Etienne Louw (ex-Altydgedacht) is as good as it gets, confirmed by its being placed in the Top 10 of the 2017 FNB Sauvignon Blanc awards and sporting a double gold from Veritas 2017.  Made from vines just a decade old, the nose offers some passion fruit and other tropical flavours with citrus and green notes being added to the fruit on the palate. But there’s also a welcome crispness without searing acidity and an  elegance with faint whiffs of the Durbanville dustiness lingering at length. Alcohol levels at 14% are a little higher than current trends dictate, but this is a wine that many sauvignon fans of all ages will sip with delight. The selling price of R72 is very reasonable for quality of this class.

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Cabernet sauvignon is not Durbanville’s  signature cultivar but the region’s winemakers produce some fine examples, and this wine, from the brilliant 2015 vintage, can comfortably  compete with its regional cousins.  Its a rich medium-bodied cab, with an agreeable freshness accompanying the berry and minty flavours, alongside a hint of the trademark Durbanville dustiness. Soft tannins mean that the wine is accessible now , but it’s sure to improve with age. Those opening it now should let it breathe for an hour or two in a decanter before pouring. It sports a gold from last year’s Michelangelo contest and sells for R100.

The rest of the range consists of a Cap Classique, a chenin blanc, and a wooded chenin named after Anna de Koning, wife of the farm’s first owner. The flagship red is the 2016 pinotage Berliet.

Call 021 825 0060 for more info or visit www.grootphesantekraal.co.za. The tasting room and restaurant are closed on Sunday and Monday.

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A SHORT HISTORY OF MOZAMBIQUE by Malyn Newitt, published by Jonathan Ball Publishers, 2018.

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To start with the author, who has penned more than 20 books on Portugal and its colonial history, Newitt is one of the leading historians on the former colony and now independent Mozambique.  Now retired, he was deputy Vice Chancellor of  Exeter university and – given his background - one expects his latest title to be academic in tone and content. It is, but the text is  very readable, and not bristling with footnotes which can be so intrusive.   This is a book  that is  not only for academics, but for all involved in any capacity with Mozambique’s government and those doing business in that country.

And -  for those who head to its ocean shores for unique wild and wonderful  holidays  - you, too,  may enjoy exploring the background to the transition from Portuguese colony to independent country.The boundaries of modern Mozambique were drawn in 1891, giving a territory that is 309 000 sq miles in extent (compared with Portugal’s 35,560 sq miles! Its long coastline gives way to a low-lying hinterland leading to a plateau, and on to the high mountains on its borders with South Africa, Zimbabwe and Malawi.

Drought and famine punctuate its history and have much influenced its development, while serious floods did much to displace people and kill their cattle. Much of the lowlands are infested with tsetse fly, preventing communities from farming with cattle,

The monsoon winds not only  bring rain but link the coastal communities with ports of the Red Sea, the Hadramaut, the Gulf, India and the islands of Comoro and Madagascar.  Dhows visited the coast to trade for Central African gold and cargoes of skins, turtle shell, ivory, mangrove poles and slaves. The Portuguese started coastal settlements at the start of the 16th century and for some 300 years a pattern of life was established: ivory and gold traded through Islamic middlemen in return for imported cloth, beads and metal ware.

In the 19th century a series of droughts caused major conflict and migrations and fed the slave trade until it was abolished in Britain and Europe. However the slave trade continued largely serving markets inside Africa. The rising demand for labour in South Africa led to the slave trade of the south evolving into export of contract labour.

The  Boers, moving away from British occupation in the Cape, founded ad hoc republics in the north of South Africa , with Delagoa Bay as  their nearest sea port for the recently discovered gold and diamonds .

Frontiers drawn in 1891 gave Portugal control of British Central Africa’s access to its ports and routes for roads and railways. The country was ill-equipped to deal with the governing such a vast territory. Many Portuguese emigrated both from Portugal and its islands to Brazil but once the railwas line from the Rand to Lourenco Marques was built things improved and the city expanded rapidly .

In 1930 Antonio Salazar, now in power in  Lisbon, overhauled colonial policy and this was followed by the Great depression . Cotton and rice became major crops, supplying Portugal and receiving imported goods in return. Portugal remained neutral during the second World War after which Mozambique benefited from infrastructure projects and basic education policies while whites were encouraged to leave their home country and settle in rural subsidised settlements.

The first modern movements seeking independence for Mozambique started  among exiles livingsin Tanzania, Malawi and Rhodesia. Frelimo was formed for the liberation of Mozambique in 1962. In 1970 Samora Machel became president of Frelimo and while the Portuguese army seemed at first to be successful in clearing Frelimo bases a military coup in Lisbon in 1974 overthrew the regime and the guerrilla forces had won by convincing officers that war that could not be won was pointless.

 Subsequent events are  within memory of many adults today, Divisions in politics split along regional rather than ethnic lines. Cashew nuts became the most valuable export. But after independence up to 90 %  of the population of European origin as well as many skilled Africans and Asians left the country causing a severe skills shortage. Frelimo took over and Samora Machel became first president in June 1975.The economy came to a virtual halt. Economic policies based on Eastern Bloc practices were introduced to counteract this, but instead the country slipped into a violent and destructive civil war which lasted until 1992. Machel was killed in an air crash in South Africa in 1986 and it was widely suspected that the South African military was to blame.

The final two chapters focus on the complicated politics  post 1992 and the economy and society since 1994. That there is, according to the author, an increase in communal ceremonies connected with ancestors and bringing of rain not only in rural areas but also in towns. Some years ago there were reports of trafficking in body parts – whether or not for traditional medicine -  but just as these occur regularly in South Africa, they are not likely to surprise South African readers.

Illustrations are limited to a handful of black and white photographs. A comprehensive list of titles suggested for further reading  and a fairly detailed index complete the text.

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Given how rapidly the upper half of Franschhoek is changing, it is as well that we get a quarterly newsletter from  Nicolette Waterford to keep us up to date. As autumn gives way to winter and the number of upcountry and international visitors diminishes, the time is ripe for locals to reclaim the village and its many culinary and vinous attractions. We are also more likely to find place to park and contemplate the magnificent scenery at our leisure, can overnight in luxurious comfort and wander down the main road the next morning, as aromas of croissants baking drift on the crisp air.

Thanks to the Leeu Collection guests can take their tastebuds a lot further than local and Gallic fare: Tuk Tuk – the popular watering hole for tailor-made brews - has just launched a new menu at its Taqueria, consisting of small snack items which make ideal accompaniments to the beers produced at the Microbrewery, unique to Franschhoek. The snack fare consists of chimichangas and croquettes while the taco selection – think corn fajitas, game fish tostadas, burritos and chicken burger – will appeal to carnivores and vegetarians alike. There is also an irresistible dessert choice based on classic Mexican and Tex-Mex favourites. Enjoy all this seven days a week from 11am onwards.

There is also a special offer of accommodation at Leeu House and the magnificent estate hotel for families staying a minimum of two nights, that is valid from now for a whole year, with exception of the period Christmas to end of February 2019. This could make a breakaway for adults and children as memorable as any destination across the planet. And that’s a personal recommendation!

For more info, see www.leeucollection.com

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Mid-April and on to  May and there is  no letup in the number of wine and food affairs on farms – the tempting invitations below came in after the earlier blog on April-May events was posted.

GlenWood’s Fine Wine and Food Experience

 

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Because its tucked away off a road less travelled, there are winelovers who yet have to unearth the charms of GlenWood and its scintillating shiraz and memorable chardonnays.

Well, now there is a further reason to make a date with this charming cellar as they have added a wine and food experience to their attractions that is not to to be missed. And this is not limited to any one month, but on offer for the foreseeable future.

The tasting room serves a palette of delicious canapés each of which is paired with one of their six award-winning wines. Guests are then invited to choose their main course for lunch from one of the pairings.most enjoyed.

The experience costs R395 and bookings are essential. The offer is open all week except for Wednesdays. Only 20 diners can be accommodated.

  

For more information contact the Tasting Room on 021 876 2044 or email tastingroom@glenwoodvineyards.co.za.

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ELGIN COOL WINE & COUNTRY FESTIVAL – PAUL CLUVER ACTIVITIES

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The picturesque Elgin Wine Valley will be a hive of activities during the festival weekend of 28 and 29 April, and the team at Paul Cluver is presenting a SALT Food & Wine Pairing lunch, available on both festival days.

Chefs Bea du Toit, Craig Cormack and Medhell Span will serve a delectable four-course meal, with Paul Cluver fine wines, and exotic salts from around the globe. Cellarmaster Andries Burger will also be there to add his expertise to the lineup.

The inclusive cost is R600 and booking is essential as only 30 places are available each day.For more info or to book your seat email saltatpaulcluver@gmail.com or phone 028 844 0012.

Tickets to the Elgin festival cost R150 a head which includes glass anad tastings at the participating farms.Golden tickets cost R200 giving access to special tastings. See

https://ecwcf.winesofelgin.co.za/index.php?page=cost-and-bookings for more info.

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Usana Farm Feast

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The weekend of May 12 – 13 sees this event take place at the farm on the Klein Welmoed road outside Stellenbosch. Usana offers an authentic farm experience where fine wines, delicious fare, and live music combine to please all ages. Farm animals may join the scene on the lawns, and other entertainment for children is also on the programme. Tickets cost R250 a head which includes the farm lunch from food stations and wine tastings. Children between 7 and 13 pay R80.

Book through www.webtickets.co.za to avoid disappointment. Email info@ussana.co.za for more info.

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CAB FRANC CARNIVAL BRINGS A TREASURY OF THESE TRENDY REDS TOGETHER

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On Saturday, 19 May the place to be is Avontuur estate on the R44 between Stellenbosch and Somerset West. From 11am until 4pm the Carnival will be swinging as no less than 19 cellars will be pouring their cab francs, their cab franc rosés and their cab franc blends for visitors. Along with tastings the wines will be on sale, and there is an unique opportunity to join one of three inter-active tutored tastings of the 2018 Cab Franc challenge Top 6 wines presented by CWM Christine Rudman. The cost is R100.

Also on the menu are food trucks, lawn games, background music and delicious dining options in the Avonturur restaurant.

Tickets cost r220 online and R250 at the gates, and includes tastings, a R50 discount coupon for food and tasting glass. Book through www.plankton.mobi.

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You can only get it from the Perdeberg cellar, and it will be a journey well-rewarded.

 

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Once again I am astounded at the ability of this giant cellar to continue to produce, year after year, chenins of impressive quality - alongside an extraordinary lineup that ranges from chenins easy-drinking and distinguished, sparkling, dessert and in blends to some prized reds in their dryland collection. And the list goes on and on. The cellar takes in some 18 000 tons annually, which would daunt most cellarmasters but this operation, now marking its 77th anniversary, seems to thrive on coping with such quantities.

Now, they have launched a maiden vintage of another dryland chenin: It’s name, Endura refers to the source, a single vineyard, for its ability to continue bearing small, flavourful grapes year after year. And the wine is a fine reflection of its provenance which is a mature vineyard sited at the peak of the Paardeberg , that fascinating lone mountain and home to terroir that yields wines of distinction on all of its slopes.

The nose offers a good promise of what’s to come, presenting both stone fruit and citrus aromas. These flavours are there on the palate, too, in a rich, full-bodied wine that is nicely balanced with both freshness and a good core of minerality. Alcohol levels are held at just under 14%. It’s delicious both on its own and with autumn favourites like poultry dishes with peaches or citrus, mild curries, butternut-filled ravioli with brown butter, rich risottos, North African tagines and some South-East Asian dishes. So, its versatile as well as offering value for money at R200. If you haven’t been to the cellar for a while, you will find several new facilities and attractions that were completed last year.

 

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How interesting. The back label of this polished, elegant and most inviting white blend defines ‘Revenant’ as “one that returns after death or a long absence.” Hmm. My trusty (and admittedly old) Cassell’s French -English dictionary lists the word as meaning “pleasing, prepossessing, charming or a ghost”. Well - leaving aside the spooky one - all these definitions apply to Revenant from False Bay Vineyard rather well.

This is another delicious wine from cellarmaster Nadia Barnard - who has helped make the False Bay range a firm and affordable favourite – this time a classic blend that mirrors the first white wine made by owner Paul Boutinot in France back in 1984. The blend of sauvignon blanc and chenin blanc brought fame to the Loire, but went out of fashion as the world turned to single cultivar wines. A decade later Boutinot established False Bay Vineyards in the Helderberg, followed by the renowned biodynamic Waterkloof 10 years on.

It is well known that our top white blends are among the finest wines to flow from Cape cellars, and Revenant can join them with pride, and, given the retail price of less than R100, comes in at considerably less than some of its competitors . As with other products from this cellar, it is made in the traditional way, with minimal intervention, maturing in old wood and concrete eggs, being left for 10 months on lees.

Comprising 80% sauvignon and the remainder chenin blanc , most of the grapes were sourced from Waterkloof’s own vineyards, some of which having reached 35 years in age. This has lent both personality and depth to the wine, which is quietly assertive and beautifully balanced, offering subtle fruity elegance with moderate alcohol levels. It will make a fine companion for a wide range of sophisticated fare, both Gallic and international gourmet but is also a delightful aperitif to sip while savouring spectacular autumn sunsets.

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I found both these Garden Route wines very charming – partly because they seem to tick all my boxes and perhaps because they encapsulate so many features that the majority of winelovers look for – from palate to purse to provenance.

As a wine writer I also appreciated a press release that that was both compact and well-written and happily sans endless pages of indulgent hyperbole and meaningless high falutin phrases.

Boets Nel, MD of the hospitable cellar of De Krans in Calitzdorp bought sauvignon blanc and pinot noir grapes from the Waboomskraal valley in the foothills of the Outeniqua range. They reached his cellar within an hour of harvesting, where highly competent winemaker Louis van der Riet made this complementary pair over the next several months.The berries were slow -ripening and intensely flavoured for both cultivars, we are told – and this is certainly borne out by the end products.

The Garden Route sauvignon blanc 2017 presents both verdant and tropical fruit aromas, which are followed on the palate by green notes and some passion fruit. While crisp, there is a pleasing lack of searing acidity, while more than a hint of flint adds structure. Moderate alcohol levels of 13,5% complete a well-balanced, appealing summer wine that is adorned with four-star Platter and Vitis Vinifera stickers and costs R70.

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Turning to the 2016 Garden Route pinot noir, its fairly pale hue forecasts the lighter, prevalent style in which its made, The wine is packed with berried fruit along with the characteristic savory character, the tannins are soft and smooth but a year in French oak has added backbone to add  appeal.

Slips down nicely on its own, but is equally happy to accompany red and white meat, meaty fish and – as always – mushrooms. Selling at R110, this wine also boasts a four-star rating and gold from Vitis Vinifera 2017.

Both wines are available only from De Krans cellar or online through www.dekrans.co.za. For more info, email dekrans@mweb.co.za or call 044 213 3314.

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A diverse, delicious and plentiful choice awaits winelovers and gourmets who relish autumn affairs in the Cape winelands and exhiliarating events in Gauteng. The list is in date order.


Friday Live Music is a new event at the beautiful Bellevue estate on the Bottelary road, which is likely to become a regular feature. Entry is free to this sunset gathering on the lawn and in the revamped restaurant on Friday April 6

where live entertainment will accompany your wine and supper. Relax to classics from artists like Elton John, Toto, Fleetwood Mac and others. Booking is essential, email info@bellevue.co.za or call 021 8652054.

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.Celebrate the restoration of the historic Druk My Niet wine estate on Saturday, April 7 . All signs of the devastating fire which all but destroyed the farm near Paarl early last year have been eradicated as the tasting room and cellar re-open their doors to visitors again. To mark the occasion a family day will see a spit braai, German sausages, artisanal pizzas, craft beer and Gluhwein on the menu, along with their estate wines. Great prizes to be won as well and entrance is free. For more info, email carlien@dmnwines.co.za or call 021 868 2393.

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Irresistible pairings

 

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Mid-April and the time is ripe for a heritage fest featuring two of South Africa’s iconic favourites, Pinotage and Biltong. It takes place this year at the hospitable Perdeberg Cellar over the weekend of April 14 – 15 from 11am to 5pm. Live music, gourmet eats combine with close to 50 Pinotages from 18 wineries for tasting and buying, some of which are paired with special biltongs. Pinotages come as trad red, white, (yes!) rosé, bubbly and blends.

More on offer including craft beer, and children’s play area. Tickets cost R200 through www.plankton.mobi or www.computicket.com or R230 at the gate, giving you access, glass and 18 Pinotage and Biltong pairings. For more info and directions, visit www.cvomarketing.co.za

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Bid for the rare and unusual at Bot River Barrels & Beards

Annual auction

 

The date to diarise is Saturday 21 April 2018 when the Barrels & Beards Best of Bot auction takes place at Wildekrans estate at 5pm. Wine farms taking part have assembled lots both zany and serious, unusual and rare, to help raise funds for the Bot River Education Foundation. Tickets cost R450 for adults and can be obtained through www.quicket.co.za. For info contact Ilze Hendrson on 028 2849488 or email ilze@endlessgroup.co.za.

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CHEESE GALORE AND SO MUCH MORE!

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The 17th popular event takes place over the long weekend of Friday April 27 – Sunday 29 at Sandringham near Stellenbosch. Along with local and international cheese, there is a huge range of artisanal and gourmet products and selected wines to wash them down.

Celebrity chefs will cook up a storm in three food theatres, finalist amateur chefs will be cooking their water-wise recipes with cheese for a cook-off over the weekend, and prizes will be awarded to winners in the Ladismith cheese-carving competition.

Cheese connoisseurs can book for the exclusive Connoisseurs’ Experience for a gourmet day with luxurious treatment at R850.

As always, no tickets are sold at the gates. Book at Computicket, Shoprite and Checkers stores. Tickets cost R180, senior citizens pay R120 and children under 14 pay R20. For more info visit www.cheesefestival.co.za, or email admin@agriexpo.co.za or call 021 9754440.

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DON’T MISS GROOTE POST’S LAST COUNTRY MARKET OF THE SEASON

 

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This takes place on Sunday April 29 between 10am and 3pm. As before, the terraces will brim with market stalls packed with delicious offerings of artisan fare, arts and crafts, homeware, decor and gifts. Darling gourmet produce from bread to olives oil, preserves and craft beer will join forces with Groote Post’s well-loved wines.

Music, family activites, outdoor darts, tractor rides and more are on the menu, and the estate's restaurant Hilda’s Kitchen will also be open, booking essential. Pets are welcome, but only on a leash. Entry to market is free of charge.

For more info contact Eldre Strydom on 022 4512202 or email eldre@iloveyzer.co.za

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Take a trip on the wild side with Delheim Mushroom Forage Pop Up

 

 

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The drought notwithstanding, it’s hoped that the wild mushrooms will again appear in the forest at Delheim estate outside Stellenbosch, any time from now. Funghi fans are invited to learn how to forage and cook wild mushrooms – first they need to become members of Delheim’s get- up- and- go Wine Club. To join an order of 12 Delheim wines is required.

There will be two excursions, both of which include a short presentation about mushrooms to find and to avoid, a foraging expedition with a guide, a cooking demo and a fungi-focussed lunch with wine.

The first will take place in April or May, depending on the first rains, and be limited to 4 plus their partners. The second will take place in June or July, but exact dates will only be confirmed two days in advance.

Inquiries and bookings to wineclub@delheim.com.

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WINE MENU'S CHARDONNAY & PINOT NOIR FESTIVAL IS BACK!
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Gauteng winelovers will be pleased to know that Wine Menu's popular Chardonnay & Pinot Noir Festival returns for the seventh time and takes place in the Killarney Country Club’s Crystal Room on Thursday, May 10, from 18h00 to 21h00.

Tickets are limited and cost R250 a head, which includes tasting glass and light snacks. These Burgundian varietals are often omitted from wine festivals because of price and limited production. As can be seen from the participating cellars, the wines are aristocrats in their field: Among the producers are Ataraxia, Vondeling, Lothian, Groot Constantia, Glenelly, Springfield, Bouchard Finlayson and Domaine Des Dieux. Wines will be on sale, often at lower than retail prices and others not generally available. Booking is essential. Book through www.webtickets.co.za or from Wine Menu in the BluBird Shopping Centre, Illovo.

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The Bubbly Festival Pops Up in Hyde Park
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The Bubbly Festival – Joburg’s celebration of South Africa’s finest Cap Classiques as well as others from around the world including Champagne takes place in Hyde Park from Friday May 18 to Sunday May 20.
 
Bubbly aficionados, epicureans and those who love the good things in life can spend the weekend popping corks, filling flutes and sipping some of the best sparkles around while snacking on fine foods and listening to live music.

 
The Bubbly Festival will be held at The Park House of Events on 7, which is located in the Hyde Park Shopping Centre (in the space previously occupied by the Imax theatre), and will feature some of South Africa’s finest Methodé Cap Classiques as well as some French Champagnes.
 
To add to the occasion there will also be a selection of fabulous foods as well as live music – details of which will be announced closer to the date.
 
Tickets cost R380 per person and include a glass and 10 tasting tickets. Bookings can be made via
www.webtickets.co.za or at the door on the day. Bubbly by the glass and bottle as well as food will be for sale.
 
Details:
 
Friday, May 18, 2018, from 17h00 to 21h00;
Saturday, March 19, 2018, from 11h00 to 15h00 and 17h00 to 21h00
Sunday, May 20, 2018 from 11h00 to 15h00.
Venue: The Park House of Events on 7 at Hyde Park Corner

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Shiraz & Charcuterie Festival 2018 at Anthonij Rupert Wyne

 

Save the date for this year’s Shiraz & Charcuterie Festival, which takes place once again at the picturesque Anthonij Rupert Wyne on Saturday, 26 May (11am to 4pm). 

This is the perfect opportunity to taste Anthonij Rupert Wyne’s range of Shiraz wines and they will be joined by 18of the country’s top Shiraz producing estates, which include Thelema Mountain Vineyards, Mullineux Wines, Rickety Bridge Winery, Stark-Condé Wines and Hartenberg Wine Estate..

 Pair them with the wide range of local and international charcuterie on offer - featuring everything from salamis and cured hams to flavoured chorizos A bountiful Anthonij Rupert Wyne Harvest Table, adorned with fresh seasonal salads, homemade exotic mushroom and fontina arancini and olives, pickles and chillies - will complement the tasty line-up. The Macaroon Bar, featuring decadent sensations such as Salted Caramel, Chocolate Cherry and Milk Tart guarantees a perfectly sweet finish.

Pre-booking is essential as tickets are limited. Your tickets, which cost R280 per person, includes entry as well as tastings of the wines on show and samples of charcuterie. Book directly via www.webtickets.co.za.

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BRUNCH ACROSS 11 COUNTRIES: Recipes of a private chef by Alix Verrips, published by Human & Rousseau, 2018.

 

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With Easter round the corner and other autumn long weekends to savour, brunch comes to mind as the perfect meal . Whether on a country excursion, lazing at home, or entertaining friends and family, there’s no better time to combine breakfast and lunch into a long, langorous and relaxed meal, preferably relished outdoors.

All of which makes this new title from local publisher Human & Rousseau both timely and inspirational. Alix Verrips is an adventurous chef who now enjoys life in Knysna, raising money for children’s charities. But she has amassed a wealth of global gastronomic experience of the most delicious kind during her 15 years as chef on luxury yachts. Having cooked for celebrities, royals, rock stars, ambassadors, statesmen and politicians on the world’s largest yachts from Alaska to Australia, she presents readers with a treasury of recipes that evoke memories of cultures and countries. Special occasions and exotic ports called for fare that contribute to irresistible brunch menus.

American Independence day calls for red, white and blue parfaits and beef sliders with blue cheese followed by a berry-filled pie, all accompanied by a seriously super-charged Bloody Mary. By way of contrast, a pheasant shooting party in the British shires features bubble and squeak, toad-in-the-hole, kedgeree and currant scones. Add spice to your brunch with a Bahamian feast, starring a colourful spread of chicken souse, sweet potato fish cakes sauced with Creole aioli and chicken and sweetcorn congee.. Chinese New Year in Sydney harbour, the Monaco Grand Pri,. a Greek Isle cruise and a stay in Capri have all produced menus that are mouthwatering and recipes that I intend to try. Other exotic fare was inspired by time spent in the Emirates, Mexico and Mallorca, while the home country is celebrated with a brunch in the bush. All those longing for that nostalgic experience of a portable feast after an early morning game safari can cook up bobotie cups, biltong, mielie and cheese muffins and malva pudding cupcakes with salted caramel sauce, washed down with gin-spiked rooibos and naartjie iced tea.

Beautifully illustrated with plenty of tempting food photographs, this is a collection that will not collect dust on the kitchen shelf.

 

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The arrival of a new vintage of Bouchard Finlayson's Blanc de Mer  is always a pleasure to contemplate. This hugely popular white blend, an annual delight is fairly unique in that it is Riesling-led and usually contains five other white cultivars. As in previous vintages  Riesling predominates with 60% in the 2017, the remaining mélange being 20% Viognier, 13% Chardonnay and 5% Sauvignon Blanc, finished with 2% Semillon.

The bouquet is delicate and flowery, but on the palate there’s both a firm foundation thanks to the personality of Riesling, along with a mix of stone and autumn fruits. A creaminess adds another delicious aspect to this crisp fresh well balanced combo that makes both a charming aperitif as well as a joyful companion to seafood and late summer salads.

All grapes are sourced from the cool South Coast region, where Bouchard Finlayson is beautifully sited in the Hemel-en-Aarde valley . Alcohol levels of 13% are moderate sand the 2017 is fine proof of  consistent quality .

Peter Finlayson has been producing this popular Cape white for many years, and Chris Albrecht has been working alongside him for the last seven years. Now Chris has been appointed winemaker, heading production since the 2017 harvest. Prior to joining Bouchard Finlayson Albrecht gained experience in cellars in New Zealand, France, and back in South Africa spent our years making the wine at Topiary in Franschhoek. The Blanc de Mer is in safe and talented hands.

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Posted by on in Blog

b2ap3_thumbnail_Carrol-Boyes-Rose_large-2.jpgWine, art and design meld seamlessly in the Carrol Boyes portfolio. It seems  fortuitous  that this renowned designer of fine functional art has a brother – John Boyes – who is not only a farmer but whose partner and friend Neels Barnardt is a wine industry veteran. It must have been a natural progression to introduce wines to complement and enhance the lifestyle products. Winemaker Hendrik Snyman is responsible for the wines in the  Sketchbook Collection, a range of six Intriguing limited edition wines, consisting of  a rosé,  chardonnay, chenin blanc ,cabernet sauvignon, merlot and red blend ( an imported champagne  provides the bubbles). Vintages range from 2014 to 2016, with the bubbly a Gallic museum edition at 2006.

Chenin blanc and rosé were the duo I sampled, both 2016 vintages, and both presenting sensible 13% alcohol levels.

The Sketchbook rosé is an all-cinsaut affair produced from dryland Swartland grapes. Its attractive smoked salmon tint well suits the characterful wine that offers a dry briskness more assertive than most easy-drinking pinks. This is a rosé with attitude, not content just to offer a berry salad but cinsaut backbone in an autumn appetiser. It will also happily complement complex salads featuring seafood or poultry or partner a gourmet picnic with panache.

As with all the Sketchbook wines, Carrol Boyes designed the label, this one featuring her chosen model with a pink gloved hand, beckoning to be unscrewed.... It sells for R90.

To the chenin blanc, which, sadly does not offer a screwcap, but it's well worth hauling out the corkscrew. Like the rosé, bottle age has no doubt benefitted this wine, produced from dryland grapes in the Darling area. Left on the lees for three months before bottling, the press release states that no portion was wooded while Cathy van Zyl’s comment in Platter 2018 refers to a “well-handled 20% oaked portion.” This is a complex chenin, good structure alongside agreeable freshness to complement flavours of stone fruit . (I don’t detect the explosion of green apple mentioned in the press release.) If asked, I would have guessed that some wood was used to add depth to this chenin adorned with our lady, this time green-gloved, who seems to be contemplating the issue. It sells for R130.

The wines are available online and at the Carrol Boyes Waterfront store at the Waterfront. For more, see www.carrolboyeswines.com.

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Posted by on in News

 

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As South Africans discover there is more to white wine than Sauvignon Blanc, Chenin and Chardonnay, the joys of Riesling are unearthed. Once savoured, many become lifelong fans, eschewing chenin’s fruity charms and chardonnay’s complexity for the delicate crispness of a Riesling, its flintiness offset – sometimes – by whiffs of kerosene alongside the acid/sweet balance.

 

Found mostly in cool climate regions like Elgin and Constantia, the grape only occupies 0,16% of our vineyards, and it is from the cool areas that the Riesling stars usually flow

 

The Paul Cluver Estate Riesling 2017 presents no trace of petrol, a characteristic probably disliked by many - which could be why cellarmaster Andries Burger works to omit it. But the typical Riesling waxy notes are both on the nose, and present on the palate, which is delicate, crisp, with flint and sweetness in elegant balance. With alcohol levels at a pleasing 10,5%, this is a wine that could complement several courses of a high summer lunch from crisp squid with green apple alioli to duck with fennel salad. Rieslings are   such  companionable wines for a wide range of fare.

The press release does not reveal the age of the vines, but I would hazard a guess that they are fairly mature. Paul Cluver has long been renowned for their beautiful Rieslings and this is one that will endorse the status.

It sells for R100 from the farm’s tasting room and can be bought online at https://www.shop.cluver.com/buy/wine.

 

The estate has also released its first Noble Late Harvest in three years, which is the second of two styles of Riesling being made at the cellar. Not having tasted it, I cannot comment but previous vintages have been very highly rated.

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Posted by on in Events

Harvest fun, eastern wine show, cheese fest and more as the advent of autumn heralds mellow days and cool nights. The events are in date order.

 

Eikendal’s annual Weintaufe Harvest Carnival

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This popular one-day family fest takes place on Sunday March 4 with plenty of action alongside great wine, pop-up food stalls and live music. Grape stomping, performing artists, a visit by cheetahs, tractor rides and golf challenges are all on the menu. The annual baptism of the new Chardonnay at 12 noon will precede tastings from the barrel and cellarmaster Nico Grobler will do the honours.

Plenty of entertainment for children too, so parents can relax. Tickets cost R120, available at the gates, and under 18s go in free. Gates open at 10am .

For more info contact the estate on 021 855 1422 or email marketing@eikendal.co.za

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CALLING WINELOVERS FROM SA's NORTH-EASTERN REGIONS

The ninth FNB Mpumalanga Wine Show takes place at Emnotweni on March 8 and 9 . Around 200 great wines from top Cape producers will see guests connect with the winemakers  and sample a stellar collection of bubbles, red, white and rose wines.

Visitors can stock up their favourite wines at show prices through the Shop@Show facility. Tickets at the door and from Computicket.com.

Details:

Venue: Emnotweni Riverside Park Mbombela (Nelspruit)

Time: 17h00 – 21h00

Price: R180 on Thur and R200 on Friday

Queries: tel 011 482 593

Website: ww.mpumalangawineshow.co.za

 

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MURATIE HARVEST FESTIVAL

Saturday 10th March 2018

 

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The Melck family will be host their annual Harvest Festival at Muratie Estate in Stellenbosch on Saturday 10th March 2018 under the venerable oaks on this most historic of Stellenbosch wine estates. Visitors will enjoy welcoming drinks then can stomp grapes, go on tractor rides or sit and sip the Muratie wines. There’s a long alfresco lunch from the Farm Kitchen to savour, and live music from the Kitchen Jammin Blues band

Entrance tickets cost R100, tastings are charged at special festival prices. To book and for more info contact Jean-Mari reyneke at 021 865 2330 or email taste@muratie.co.za.

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ANTHONIJ RUPERT GRAPE-INSPIRED LUNCH

The terrace at the estate Tasting Room will make the venue for an appetising three-course harvest lunch throughout the day on Saturday March 24. After a welcome glass of L’Ormarins Blanc de Blancs 2012 guests will enjoy the brilliant Cape of Good Hope wines with their meal. The menu incorporates elements of the grape, such as verjuice, raisins and vine leaves.

The cost of R550 a head includes food, wines and gratuity. To book call 021 874 9074 or email tasting@rupertwines.com

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Pizza & Wine Festival | 21 & 22 April 2018

 

Vergenoegd estate makes the venue for a Pizza & Wine fest over the weekend of April 21 – 22, from 11am – 4pm. Live music and superb wines will accompany the pizzas, while parents  relax while children are entertained with fun activities. Producers will pour a selection of fine wines and guests can purchase their choice to take home.

Tickets cost R180 for adults and R60 for children which includes tasting glass and five tasting coupons. Also on offer are VIP tickets at R300 which allow unlimited offerings of the Runner Duck range and exclusive seating area.

Book directly via www.webtickets.co.za to avoid disappointment as tickets are limited.

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2018 Barrels & Beards day at Bot River.

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The date to diarise is Saturday April 21 when the end of harvest is celebrated at the Bot River wineries, this year focussing on a Taurean theme of the bull.

The participating farms are:

1.         Anysbos

2.         Barton

3.         Beaumont

4.         Arcangeli

5.         Eerste Hoop

6.         Gabriëlskloof

7.         Luddite

8.         Genevieve

9.         Goedvertrouw

10.        Thorne & Daughters

11.        Momento

12.        Maremmana

13.        Paardenkloof

14.        Rivendell

15.        Wildekrans

Proceeds from the auction of Bot River wines benefit various educational projects in the region. The dinner will showcase local produce and specialities.

The annual Beard-off contest sees judges deciding on which winemaker is voted owner of the year’s Best Bot Beard.

The festival venue is Wildekrans Estate, starting at 5pm. Tickets cost R450 for adults.

Online tickets obtainable through www.quicket.co.za. For enquiries and pre-bookings contact Ilse Henderson at Wildekrans Wine Estate at 028 284 9488 or email ilze@endlessgroup.co.za.

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SA CHEESE FESTIVAL IS WATER WISE

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Agri-Expo has announced that the 2018 SA Cheese Festival, taking place over the Freedom Day long weekend from April 27 – 29 at the usual venue, Sandringham, off the N1 will be a water-wise event.

In response to Wesgro’s call to keep the Western Cape economy growing and create jobs, Agri-Expo has consulted roleplayers to find ways to minimise impact on water resources, by removing the festival from the water grid. Temporary chemical toilets, borehole water, drinking water from non-drought areas, waterless recipes for cooking demos are some of the items that visitors will find.

Tickets are available at Computicket (online and in Shoprite and Checkers stores) at R180 per person per day. Senior citizens pay R120 and children from 2 to 13 years pay R20. No tickets will be sold at the gates.

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