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Posted by on in Events

A varied lineup of events as winter gives way to a green and glorious spring!

 

Benguela on Main restaurant is offering a five-course Christmas dinner on Saturday July 30 . Chef Jean Delport is including treats like smoked breast of goose on his menu, which costs R540 a head. Pair your meal with Benguela Cove wines, and Somerset West residents can enjoy a complimentary drive service to and from the restaurant. For more information or to make a reservation to avoid disappointment, visit the website, call 087 357 0637 or email onmain@benguelacove.co.za

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 Steenberg’s Cool Runnings charity trail run takes place through the Constantia vineyards on Saturday August 6. Choose from a 5 or 10km loop. All proceeds to the Mdzananda Vet Clinic in Khayelitsha, a community project that provides quality care for ill and abandoned animals. Finish with a glass of Steenberg sparkling sauvignon blanc and follow with a free wine tasting if you wish. A Mdzananda Vet Donation Box will be available prior to the race where leashes, blankets, dog or cat food and other pet items can be dropped into.The entry fee is R130 per trail runner, R50 per teen between the ages of 12-17, while children under 12 have free entry. Registration opens at 7am outside the Bistro1682 Restaurant. Walkers are welcomed. The briefing takes place 15-minutes ahead of the race at 8am. Pre-booking is essential and can be done online at www.quicket.co.za.

 

Bottelary Hills Wine Route ‘Pop Up’ Lunch

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Savour a slow-cooked Sunday pork lunch with chef Bertus Basson on August 14 at Groenland estate when he will present a three-course lunch that smokes, sears and sizzles. The fires will be lit and guests can enjoy Bottelary Hills wine ahead of their meal. Lunch costs R350 a head, including a wine tasting and glass of wine per course. Book through www.wineroute.co.za or Tel: (021) 886 8275 or marketing@wineroute.co.za

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Nedbank Cape Winemakers Guild Auction Showcase of rare, individual wines

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This popular annual event takes place in Cape Town on Thursday, 18 August at the CTICC from 6pm and in Johannesburg on Wed August 24 at the Atrium, Nedbank Sandton at 6pm. Tickets cost R250 which includes a tasting glass.

Wine enthusiasts cantaste these unique collectors’ wines crafted exclusively in small volumes for the 2016 Cape Winemakers Guild Auction by the Guild’s 47 members.Members of the Guild will also be presenting some of their acclaimed offerings sold under their own labels. Guests can also bid on rare signed bottles from previous Guild auctions during the Silent Auction. Founded in 1999, the Development Trust seeks to transform the wine industry by educating, training and empowering young talent through initiatives such as the Protégé Programme, a highly acclaimed mentorship scheme for upcoming winemakers and viticulturists.Tickets can be purchased via www.webtickets.co.za

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“WE LOVE WINE” FEST RETURNS TO CAPEGATE 

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If Calling northern suburbs winelovers! Just ahead of spring, head to Capegate Shopping Centre for a great weekend wine fest, taking place from 5 - 9pm on Friday August 26 and from 12 noon to 6pm on Saturday 27th.

 

 

Festival visitors can taste and buy more than 100 wines directly from the wineries, which include large producers with well-known brands and smaller boutique and family-owned wineries, giving a taste of the best of South Africa’s winelands in one venue.

 

The Cape Wine Academy is presenting a wine theatre (Three sessions on Friday and four sessions on Saturday) with fun tastings and pairings on the programme at set times.

 

Participating wineries include: Alexanderfontein/Ormonde, Arendskloof/Eagle’s Cliff, Beyerskloof Wines, Biocape Wines, Bonnievale Cellar, Diemersfontein Wines, Dieu Donnè Vineyards, Deux Frères Wines, Du Toitskloof Wines, Edgebaston, Eerstehoop Wines, Fledge & Co, Groenland, Imbuko Wines, La Couronne Wine Estate, MWS, Orange River Cellars, Overhex Wines International, Perdeberg Winery, Peter Bayly Wines, Stellenbosch Hills, Villiera Wines, Villiersdorp Cellar, Yonder Hill Wines.

 

The Pebbles Project, which looks after disadvantaged children, especially those impacted by alcohol, is the charity beneficiary of the festival and will be present to spread their message and raise funds and awareness.

 

Tickets from the door or through www.quicket.co.za  cost R70 pp (Includes a branded tasting glass) Bookings for the CWA theatre sessions can be made at the ticket office.

 

For up to date information, visit www.capegatecentre.co.za

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Bot River hosts blooming nice Spring Weekend

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Enjoy a relaxed weekend in the Overberg from September 2 – 4 during the annual fest hosted by the winemaking community. The region features 11 wine farms, each of which will offer attractions ranging from farm fare, olive oils, fine wines and local talent. Attractions include sausage-making course at Luddite, oysters and bubbles from Genevieve MCC, fynbos hikes at Paardenkloof, lunch at Wildekrans and at Gabrielskloof. Plenty to amuse the small fry as well. Farms will be open from 10am to 4pm. Tickets (weekend pass) cost R100 and obtainable from www.quicket.co.za .For more information on the Bot River Spring Weekend 2016 contact Melissa Nelsen at Cell: 083 302 6562 or email Melissa@genevievemcc.co.za.

 

MIKI CIMAN OF LA MASSERIA INTRODUCES SMALLER CHEESE MAKERS

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Be it gorgonzola, pecorino, fontina, mozzarella, provolone, brie, chèvre, blue or cheddar, the Say Cheese! Artisan Cheese Fair will celebrate all things cheese on 24 and 25 September 2016 at the Italian Club, Milnerton. THE event will bring together artisan cheesemakers, cheese lovers, bakers, brewers and visitors. Says Ciman, “The Fair will allow guests to appreciate every step of the farm-to-table process of cheese making, while highlighting the extraordinary local talent we have in this field. Chefs will take part and wine will be on sale. Tickets will be on sale at the door, at R80 for adults and R30 for children from 11 – 18. Children under 10 go in free.For further information, please email Kiki at saycheesefair@gmail.com or phone Elize Nel on 072 795 4214.

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A CULINARY JOURNEY OF SOUTH AFRICAN INDIGENOUS FOODS [compiled] by Kgaladi Thema-Sethoga and Ursula Moroane-Kgomo. Published by Indiza Co-operative and Modjaji Books. 2015.

 

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Myrna Robins enjoyed the gastronomic trip through our provinces, but questions the fare included in one of the chapters.

Those following western diets may gulp at thought of a snack of salted stinkbugs fried in butter, while others – who spend as little time as possible in the kitchen – may appreciate the Swati dish Indakala,or boiled,salted peanuts. Both can be found in the second edition of a compilation of our indigenous dishes, following on the original, published in 2000 through the CSIR.

The new and intriguing collection of heritage recipes from 11 ethnic groups across South Africa, reveals that much of the fare is also contemporary, as current generations of rural cooks continue to use local ingredients and traditional recipes to feed their families.

IndiZA Foods is a Pretoria-based company headed by MD Kgaladi Thema-Sethoga and Operations Director Ursula Moroane-Kgomo, both high-powered businesswomen with degrees in food science, business management and considerable experience in the food industry. Both are also passionate about the preservation of indigenous culinary cultures, women empowerment and rural development. Their joint enthusiasm resulted in the publication of this worthy addition to our traditional culinary literature.

Women in the rural communities were invited to submit recipes for the food they cook daily: These reveal simple fare using local ingredients, occasionally enlivened by stock cubes, seasonings, and items like margarine. Several high schools were also involved in the project.

The compilers started in North West, with Tswana dishes and went on to Mpumalanga where Ndebele and Swati specialities were hunted down. The Free State yielded Sotho staple fare and the northern province of Limpopo saw recipes collected from Tsonga, Pedi and Venda cuisines. In the Eastern Cape the Xhosa gastronomic heritage was celebrated and Kwa –Zulu Natal presented Zulu menus. From the Western Cape comes a listing described as Khoisan recipes and the final grouping is Afrikaans marked, somewhat strangely, as centred in Gauteng.

The dishes are, as one would expect, simple, largely straightforward renderings of grains, legumes and leaves, gourds and tubers, sparked by indigenous fruits and enlivened by worms and insects. Beef and chicken feature occasionally. There is not a single seafood recipe in this collection.

Perhaps because of their (comparatively) exotic nature, I enjoyed browsing through the cuisines of the northern groups in particular: Among the Pedi recipes is one labelled baobab-fruit yoghurt, a good start to the day, while Venda cooks lift their protein intake with Mashonzha (mopani worms and peanuts) and Thongolifha (stinkbugs fried in butter ). Several species of Morogo, or wild leaves are used, including Pigweed or Amarinth, Blackjack, Spider plant, pumpkin, and wild jute. Breads are uncommon, but the Tswana make Diphaphata, a flatbread using wheat flour, Ndebele cooks use brown bread flour for their steamed bread, while others are based on mealie meal. Desserts are almost non-existent although there’s a Sotho recipe for bottling peaches in sugar syrup.

I contacted the compilers to ask why Gauteng was used as a source for Afrikaans recipes and was told that they invited several groups in the Western and Northern Cape to take part, without success, so eventually resorted to finding them from Gauteng-based Afrikaners. The recipes are authentic Cape cuisine, dishes that have become South African classics.

I gazed, somewhat incredulously, at the pictures and recipes in the Khoisan section, pages where I expected to find items like shellfish, venison, ghaap, sour figs, veldkool, waterblommetjies, and perhaps drinks based on milk. Instead, there’s a Greek-style salad with feta and olives, a caramel pud and a standard white bread recipe. Liver and onions and a mutton potjie (with red wine and packet soup powder) could just pass muster but there is virtually nothing that says “Khoisan” or “Khoi-khoin” in this mini-collection. The recipes were sourced from a group of cooks in Vredendal, and I contacted one of the contributors to ask her how these came to be regarded as Khoisan. Freda Wicomb is the housekeeper at a local boarding school, and is a popular and capable cook, but she had no answer, saying this was how she cooked.

Khoisan, referring to two distinct groups of early South African inhabitants, is a term that should not be applied to their cuisines, as they were very different. The Bushmen, or San were hunter-gatherers while the Khoi were herders. The latter group’s culinary and cultural heritage has been well researched, by fundis such as Dr Renata Coetzee whose brilliant book Kukumakranka presents an exhaustive discussion on the subject. Ingredients used in the past can still be found today, and cooks of both Griqua and Nama descent use veldkos in their potjies, and make askoek, potbrood and vetkoek, as did their forbears.

I suggested that the compilers also contact Chef Shaun Schoeman of Solms Delta’s Fyndraai restaurant, whose Heritage menu includes Khoe-Khoen breads, waterblommetjie soup and desserts starring herbs like buchu, for their next edition.

Kgaladi Thema-Sethoga assures me this section will be more authentic and will also include Cape Malay cuisine. Sadly we will have to wait until 2024 for the new edition.

Meanwhile, this title, illustrated with photographs of many of the recipes, is well-indexed and includes information on many of the ingredients unknown to western cooking. The book is endorsed by the SA Chefs Association and supported by the Department of Arts and Culture.

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Victorian wine cellar at Mont Rochelle

 

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Great to see winemaker Dustin Osborne back in the mountainside cellar of Mont Rochelle. Pretty sure I recognised one or two of the staff at the Country Kitchen as well; if they were there seven years ago, then I am probably right in thinking I met them when gathering information on this unique farm for my Franschhoek Food cookbook.

Champagne was its first name, given to this picturesque stretch by Abraham de Villiers in 1694. It changed to an equally positive Goedehoop more than a century later, finally was christened Mont Rochelle by a 20th century descendant, Graham de Villiers when he acquired it. Earlier this century then owners of hotel and vineyards, Erwin Schnitzler and Miko Rwayitare merged the two to create Mont Rochelle hotel and Mountain vineyards, and newly appointed winemaker Dustin Osborne started producing some memorable reds, one of which is the farm’s flagship red blend today.

Although Franschhoek is a sophisticated village growing increasingly used to foreigners buying bits and pieces, the acquisition of the estate by Virgin Limited Edition collection, and Richard Branson in particular, caused a buzz, which died down while renovations were undertaken at the hotel and gourmet restaurant, and at the rustic Country Kitchen and picturesque cellar.

The latter two venues have not changed much – the 150 year-old-cellar, a former fruit packshed, is as appealing as ever, although Dustin is happier with new flooring and updated machinery. The restaurant, open to terrace and lawns lining a big dam, is still relaxed, serving deli-type fare inside and out, along with picnics.

During a recent visit, a handful of wine writers started their tasting in the cellar, with a charming sauvignon blanc 2015, grapes from the farm’s 22 -year-old vineyards, the fresh wine with subtle fruit lent complexity by 10% semillon and 2and half % viognier. Well-balanced and a great buy at R85.

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Osborne has long been a champion chardonnay maker, and his latest, Mont Rochelle’s 2015 chardonnay is as good as any I remember. It’s elegant, fresh, with tangible minerality, full-bodied, with a long finish. Limited edition from vines planted in ’94, just over half barrel-matured, this is equally delicious as an aperitif or complementing voguish salads and well-bred poultry. We paired

[Caption: Dustin Osborne, Enrico Jacobs and Jenny Prinsloo in picnic mode] Photograph: Shantelle Visser

it with an inspired cauliflower and vanilla risotto – memorable. The wine is also reasonably priced at R100 from farm.

More good news is the launch of an easy-drinking red, Little Rock Rouge 2014, a cab-based blend with merlot and splashes of mourvèdre and petit verdot adding aroma and flavour to a vibrant, enjoyable wine with smooth tannins. Along with its 2015 white counterpart, not yet released, these cost R72 each.

During Dustin’s first stint at the farm he created a fine syrah-based blend named Miko in honour of former owner the late Miko Rwayitare. This flaghip 2009 vintage wine, intense, complex, and well-balanced with dark fruit, spice and savoury undertones, is showing well and is an impressive introduction to the potential of the farm’s terroir.

Our little group had moved through cellar to lawns to tasting cellar to terrace, where we teamed this vinous star with tender venison on sweet potato. Dustin then produced a number of aged cabs which had been discovered under a floor in the adjoining manor house during renovations and an informal vertical tasting commenced, starting off with the ’96 vintage… A few of these may be added to the cellar stock for those seeking museum class reds.

 

We did not see the hotel or more formal Miko restaurant during our visit but heard that the hotel is just about full until Easter, with bookings for weddings increasing nicely. What impressed me at the winery and Country Kitchen was the informality, the friendly yet efficient service, and an atmosphere that is far from stiff or grand. One gets the impression that Branson, having appointed good staff, is content to leave his estate in capable hands. Global visitors can now move from his private game reserve, Ulusaba, in the north of South Africa to our incomparable winelands, for a holiday that can compete with the best on the planet.

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We all knew that Kleine Zalze's new cellarmaster had big boots to fill, as he took over from Johan Joubert. Alastair Rimmer's maiden chenin blanc and chardonnay are both ample, enjoyable proof that he will be carrying on the cellar's impressive reputation for over-delivery on quality and pure enjoyment with a range of wines that have attracted strings of awards both here and internationally.

The farm's Vineyard Selection chenin blanc 2015 follows in the tradition of a beautifully balanced meld of fruit with structure lent from subtle oak. Enough acidity to keep everything fresh, ideal late summer wine for both aperitifs and al fresco fare, but can safely be kept for a few years as well. A very good buy at R77.

In similar style, the Vineyard Selection chardonnay 2015, selling for R80 from cellar door is a fine example of Rimmer's talent: both Stellenbosch and Robertson grapes were sourced for this wine, which spent seven months in oak before blending and bottling. The citrus, pear and stone fruit, with apple providing a floral note, fulfil chardonnay fans' expectations, there's a mineral core, and overall elegance which combines to make this a classic with complexity that should develop further if cellared.

In best Kleine Zalze tradition, these constitute another pair of winners.

 

 

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Posted by on in News

b2ap3_thumbnail_Rose--Ken-F-Petit-Ros.jpgINb2ap3_thumbnail_Saronsberg-rose.jpgb2ap3_thumbnail_Muratie-Lady-Alice-Brut-Ros.jpg THE PINK AND LOVING IT

 

The focus has been on rosé recently,as these wines are promoted for Valentines day – or weekend as it is this year. I’ve been sampling enjoyable examples while putting together a story for the national lifestyle pages of the Independent group. And, doing it during a heatwave made me appreciate the charms of a well -chilled pink, particularly those with some backbone along with berry flavours.

I am sure that the first Rickety Bridge rosé fest on Saturday the 13th is going to be a sellout – the attractions are wide-ranging and the heatwave should be past its worst, according to predictions. It’s been a while since I tasted examples of their winemaker, Wynand Grobler’s craft, but I have long regarded him as one of the valley’s most talented – and his Foundation Stone rosé (shiraz/Grenache/mourvèdre) and his scintillating NV Cap Classique brut rosé confirm my opinion.

Meanwhile, up the Franschhoek pass to La Petite Ferme, that perennially popular destination for thousands of repeat visitors, now under new Swiss ownership. There’s a new winemaker too, but the 2015 rosé, a largely merlot affair with a dash of sauvignon blanc, is still a product of the Dendy-Youngs. This salmon-tinted summer charmer presents an aroma of rose petal, with berry and cinnamon flavours, with a little sauvignon zest. It finished dry on the palate.

Staying in the Franschhoek valley, Vrede en Lust's enjoyable dry rose, named  Jess, has become a firm favourite in the Vrede en Lust range. Named after the owner's eldest daughter, this crisp wine with its berry and melon notes is a blend of mostly pinotage, with some shiraz and a dash of grenache.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Glenrose-3rd-attempt.jpgThe L’Avenir team from Stellenbosch is not content to produce admirable conventional pinotage, but has added a fine pinotage rosé to the range, its patrician status emphasized by an unique bottle featuring a protea-shaped punt. Glenrosé is made in the Provencal style, its nose of rose petals and strawberry and citrus ahead of a crisp, dry but fruity flavours on the palate, along with a mineral presence. This top of the range example sells for R200. b2ap3_thumbnail_Glenrose-3rd-attempt.jpg

 

 

Turning to my adopted wine region, there are two rosés that I strongly recommend to visitors heading Robertson  way soon: Tanagra’s superb example produced from cab franc has just one fault, and that is there isn’t enough of it. The other is the 2015 rosé from Quando, Fanus Bruwer’s boutique cellar near Bonnievale. He use mourvèdre for this charmer.

I also enjoyed Saronsbergs all-shiraz rosé from their Provenance range. Cellarmaster Dewaldt Heyns specializes in shiraz, among other reds, and this offers a light-hearted aside, complete with sculptor Angus Taylor’s Earth Mother on the label. Tulbagh has acquired a major red wine player with the establishment of this art-filled estate.

One would hardly know where to start when contemplating pinks from the vast Stellenbosch region, but for good value for consistent quality, the dry, fruity and flavour-packed rosé in Ken Forrester’s Petit range is ready to complement many a late summer al fresco meal.

When it comes to rosé Cap Classique bruts, I always enjoy Allee Bleue’s, the NV from Graham Beck and have heard great reports about Webersburg’s NV pinot noir/pinotage brut. Finally, its been a long time since I tasted it, but if memory serves me well, the patrician Lady Alice all-pinot, MCC from Muratie, which comes complete with tales of memorable early 20th century parties, is a bubbly to consider.

A word of thanks to those marketing colleagues who obtained rosé samples for me at such short notice – Posy, Nicolette, Melissa, hugely appreciated.

Whatever fare you’re planning for the coming weekend it’s likely that a crisp pink will pair well. Picnics, salads, sushi, shellfish, salmon, berry finales, you name it, rosé will enhance it.

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A maiden bubbly and a pair of lightly sparkling sippers allow summer to be celebrated with effervescence at prices to please.

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Stellenbosch Hills has added a lively bubbly to its popular Polkadraai range:- Their Sauvignon Blanc Sparkling Brut 2017, priced at just R60, is dry, with plenty of zing, offering an easy-drinking sparkler for brunch, lunch and sundown gatherings. Just 12,5% alcohol levels will add to its appeal for many, while it’s good to remember that Stellelnbosch Hills gives a percentage of profits from every bottle from the Polkadraai range to the Polka Kid Community Project, a fund that helps provide teaching aids to the Vlottenburg Primary School. And, consumers can beneft by buying a six-bottle case of Polkadraai Brut (or any other wine in this range) on a Friday, when they will pay for only five.

From Stellenbosch to Robertson where the ever-innovative Robertson Winery has released the 2016 vintages of their  lightly sparkling summer sippers:    a Sauvignon Blanc and a Pinot Noir Rosé, both captured in attractive skittle-shaped  bottles starring colour-coded screwcaps, complete with polka dots.

Senior winelovers will recall that affordable petillant whites from Paarl were all the rage among young budget-conscious party-goers, who – having been to Mozambique and enjoyed Portuguese “green” wine – wanted something similar back home.

The sauvignon is crisp and dry, the rose hints at berry and watermelon flavours. Both the white and the pink sparklers are low in alcohol – 10% and 9% respectively and both are priced at around R55.

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Just a fortnight to go before the finalists in this year’s Diners Club Winemaker and Young Winemaker of the Year get to know who made it to the top . Nail-biting times for them and their cellars, while usually these announcements signal the end of annual competitions and awards and the start of the silly season.

Winemaker of the Year Finalists: Category - Pinotage

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  • André Scriven - Rooiberg Pinotage Reserve 2016
  • Christiaan Groenewald - New Cape Wines - Arendskloof Pinotage 2015 and Eagles Cliff Pinotage 2017
  • Clayton Reabow - Môreson Widowmaker Pinotage 2015
  • De Wet Viljoen - Neethlingshof Pinotage 2016
  • Niël Groenewald - Bellingham Homestead Pinotage 2016

Young Winemaker of the Year Finalists: Category - White Wines

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  • Charl Schoeman - Simonsig Roussanne 2016 and Roussanne Marsanne 2016
  • Murray Barlow - Rustenberg Stellenbosch Chardonnay 2016
  • Philip Viljoen - Bon Courage Chardonnay Unwooded 2017 and Noble Late Harvest 2016 (Weisser Riesling/Gewürztraminer)
  • Wade Roger-Lund - Jordan Blanc de Blancs Méthode Cap Classique 2015

The winners of both titles will be announced at a gala dinner at La Residence Hotel in Franschhoek on 25 November . The winning Winemaker receives R50 000 and the Young Winemaker R25 000. Both winners also receive two return tickets on Delta Airlines to any wine producing region in the USA.

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Welmoed is a venerable label, and one of several brands and ranges produced by Stellenbosch Vineyards, a global wine group that exports around 80% of its production, mostly to the Netherlands. They are based on the 17th century Welmoed farm outside Stellebnosch and the recently released range is called the Heritage Selection, which is in keeping with a farm dating back to 1690.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Welmoed-Sauvignon-Blanc-2017.jpgThe wines, all selling at R50 from cellar door, include a sauvignon blanc, cab,  chenin, chardonnay, merlot, shiraz, pinotage and rosé. This re-branding is clearly aimed at the consumer who enjoys easy-drinking wines at affordable prices. The two I sampled – sauvignon blanc 2017  and cabernet sauvignon 2016 fit this description, with the former presenting a well-balanced mix of green and gooseberry flavours with a fresh zing, moderate alcohol levels of 13,5%. The cabernet sauvignon should please legions of fans who enjoy reds that display berry flavours, a touch of oak and are full-bodied, but stay with a moderate 13,% alcohol level.

The Heritage Selection complements the other upmarket brands like the Credo Limited Releases and Stellenbosch Vineyard’s Flagship wines.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Welmoed-Cabernet-Sauvignon-2016.jpgI like the story of how Welmoed got its name: the farm, originally granted to Simon van der Stel, was subsequently inherited by one Jacobus van der Heyden who was one of the farmers who rebelled against the infamous governor Willem van der Stel. He was imprisoned, later released in ill-health whereupon the local community exclaimed "Deze vent heft wel moed”  iow this chap does have courage...

A toast to Jacobus is in order!

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It’s still easy to get off the beaten track in the Robertson valley, and, as sophistication threatens to change the nature of some farms on this wine route, the country cellars on roads less travelled gain in appeal.

One such is Windfall, a truly rustic farm that maintains its simple boutique origins even as winemaker Kobus van der Merwe adds new wines to the range  - a maiden Cap Classique will soon join the others.

When I first visited the farm off the Agterkliphoogte road the tasting centre had just been completed. Today there are self-catering cottages, lemon groves along with 63ha of red and white cultivars. The farm's six-year-old potstill brandy, named The Hunter, produced from Chenin Blanc, is attracting considerable praise.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Windfall-Chenin-Blanc-Bottleshot_20171026-141720_1.jpgThe recently released 2017 Chenin Blanc, a fresh and easy-drinking charmer,  offers a range of stone fruit and citrus flavours. It's an appealing partner to casual al fresco fare with  pleasing alcohol levels kept to 12,5%. It sells for R72, which is also the price of the Windfall Grenache Rosé, an off-dry pink presenting melon and berry notes which will find many a fan, and with a moderate alcohol count of just 11,5%.

 Although I have not tasted either, I noticed that Windfall notched up two golds at the 2017 Michelangelo Awards, for their 2015 Cabernet and 2014 Shiraz,  Visitors wanting to sample this boutique collection need to make an appointment before heading to the cellar.

The farm, originally called Spes Bona, was in the Lourens family until cricketing legend Eddie Barlow bought it and changed the name as he watched mists rollling down the mountains that surround the valley. Of course the name also points to unexpected good fortune, a legacy that the present owners, the Alexander family, are busily building on.

To finish on a cricketing note, the owners, winemakers and team at Windfall are on a good wicket, and one that is sure to keep getting better.

See www.windfallwine.co.za for more info.

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Raise your glasses to the short-lived Battle of Muizenberg 222 years ago

The incredible history of Steenberg’s first owner has been well documented (and nicely embroidered) over the centuries. But as the first and feisty woman owner of this early mountainside farm, Catharina certainly made her mark as she worked her way through several husbands while running a farm that also saw travellers overnighting there before continuing to Simons Bay the following day.

More than a century later, other occupants of that old farm stood on that stony mountainside gazing down toward the Indian Ocean lapping at the False Bay beach. This time, there was a war on, known as the Battle of Muizenberg. It was August, 1795.

Former friends, now foes, Holland, who controlled the Cape through the Dutch East India Company no longer allowed Britain access to the Cape, a position that the British East India Company could not tolerate as it was an essential point of supplies in the long journey to the East. A fleet of nine Royal Navy ships, which included two warships, Ruby and Stately and a frigate, Sphynx among them, sailed forth, enabling the British to take control of Simons Town in mid June. The Dutch retreated to their seaside Muizenberg fort, with just 300 men. On August 7 the British sent two battalions to Muizenberg supported by three saips at sea, including Stately. It was all over by 2pm when the Dutch retreat to Zandvlei and the first British Occupation of the Cape was a reality.

I don’t know whose idea it was to honour three of the tall  ships which took part in this short- lived skirmish, but not only is it a brainwave to mark an historic day in the Southern Peninsula chronicles, but wines with a story to tell increase their appeal, and so it is with this maiden trio of enjoyment.

Lift a glass to Ruby, a 2017 rosé with class, made up of just more than half syrah

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and the rest cinsaut, a wine that sings of summer days and long, warm nights. It’s dry, but there’s ample fruit, berries vying for attention with watermelon and a little spice, hints of citrus, an aperitif that will also pair happily with picnics, salads and fruity desserts. Moderate alcohol levels of 12,5% and already sporting its first award, a Double Gold from Rosé Rocks. Selling for R86 at the cellar door

Sphynx 2017 is a charming chardonnay, my favourite of the three, produced from Robertson valley grapes that have been carefully handled to present an elegant

 

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wine, whose stay in oak has added depth and structure without any obvious wood.  Characteristic citrus, caramel and peach, with quince adding a Med flavour. It’s fresh and sprightly, alcohol held at 13,5%, a wine for toasting, for partnering with seafood, poultry and serious salads. It costs R135 at the farm.

The third tall ship is Stately, well depicted here as a 2015 cab-led blend with 37% shiraz making the remainder, a dense wine with elegant smooth texture, both

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accessible and ready to drink. There is a gamut of flavours to identify from olives and berries, black pepper to wafts of licorice. Moderate alcohol levels add to its appeal, and this is the only wine closed with cork. It sells for  R135, and is a versatile red that will adapt to many an occasion.

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SEASON OF SAUVIGNON SETS DURBANVILLE A-TINGLE!

 

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A bakers dozen of inviting farms makes up the Durbanville Wine Valley, a group that is popular both collectively and individually. The annual Season of Sauvignon takes place over the weekend of October 28 -29, and is a celebration that needs little publicity, as its hugely popular with both locals and visitors. This year 11 farms are taking part, offering a variety of festivities, pouring their sauvignons and offering entertainment and good food to boot.

 

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See www.durbanvillewine.co.za for the detailed programme and contemplate your chosen itinerary. Book your festival tickets via www.webtickets.co.za.

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FRANSCHHOEKS BUBBLY FEST MARKS THE START OF THE FESTIVE SEASON.

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The Magic of Bubbles, the annual Cap Classique and Champagne Festival takes place on December 2 and 3, and guests are asked to dress to impress in black and white. As in previous years the grand marquee will be pitched at the Huguenot Monument, and the local and imported bubblies will be accompanied by stylish fare from local restaurants.

Tickets cost R375 a head, and include tasting glass and coupons. Children under 18 enter free of charge. Book through www.webtickets.co.za. Those paying with Mastercard receive a 10% discount on ticket prices and purchases.

 

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Eikendal Vineyards swirls Cheesecake & Wine Pairings

 

 

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This popular Stellenbosch destination always pops up with a new way to pair their fine wines with tasty bites. This summer it's cheesecake and wine pairings, where the cellar’s crisp sauvignon blanc is matched to lemon cheesecake, the berry cheesecake with their sauvignon blanc/chardonnay blend and their Janina unwooded chardonnay is partnered with salted caramel cheesecake.

The Eikendal Cheesecake & Wine Pairing Experience costs R80 per person and will be swirling the senses from October 2017 until April 2018, Tuesdays to Sundays between 10:00 and 16:30. To book contact Chantal-Lee at 021 855 1422 or send an email toinfo@eikendal.co.za.

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Charles Withington - seen here with Gypsy -  is renowned both as a successful négociant and a charming connoisseur in the Cape wine world . He is based in Darling where he presides over his inviting wine boutique The Darling Wine Shop, and he is passionate about the district of Darling as a source of good grapes and fine wine that reflects the terroir.

“A Darling Wine” reads the back label below the name Roan Ranger. This 2015 blend encompasses all that I could ask for in a red – Cinsaut-led, intriguing name,b2ap3_thumbnail_WITHINGTON-Roan-Ranger-Cinsaut-Grenache-Mourvedre-2013-HR.jpg

appealing front label, and a delightful story behind the product. Happily, the wine itself lives up to every expectation, an unshowy blend of immense charm, smooth, beautifully integrated, the Cinsaut dominating while benefitting from vigorous, companionable Grenache and powerful, meaty Mourvèdre.

Charles Withington fulfilled a long-held ambition with the creation and release of this wine, one which saw his quest for the production of  a Rhone-style blend that would combine the harvest of Darling grapes that best reflect the vintage year, while introducing a sense of the communication between man and horse. His firm belief in Cinsaut goes back many years to when he worked at Rustenberg. The Withington association with, and love of, horses is a long-established one, here celebrated by naming the wine after a roan, or horse whose coat consists of more than one colour (an equine blend, suggests Withington.)

Made with immense care which shows in every sip, each of the three components were harvested and vinified separately. Malolactic fermentation took place in lightly oaked French fourth and fifth- fill barrels and the final blend selection made after one month.

Withington’s Nguni Malbec 2015is another wine that presents both a lesser-known cultivar and honours an indigenous beast and celebrates both along with Charles’ love of the Darling wine district. Most of us first encountered Malbec through the Argentinian product, and now  various New World countries are planting the grape and UK sales reveal it to be the fastest growing varietal in sales terms, Darling can boast nine hectares of Malbec, which, Withington points out is four times the national average. Grapes for the Nguni Malbec 2015 were sourced from a dryland single vineyard on Oranjefontein farm.

Charles likens the grape to the patient, tolerant Nguni cattle, which have been produced for beef in the Darling area for decades. Juicy and fruity, more than meaty, this is moreish Malbec, medium-bodied, and enjoyable solo as well as complementing good red meat (Nguni beef?)

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At R90 a bargain buy, and one that could hardly be bettered as an introduction to this dark and ancient French varietal.

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We have all savoured the quality whites from the memorable 2015 vintage. Now some fine reds are emerging to claim their place in the sun. Among the first  is this enjoyable cabernet sauvignon from Boschendal, a powerful and complex wine that is  presenting its  credentials as a Stellenbosch cab with real depth. On the nose, whiffs of berry and cedar, leading to nicely balanced tannins and dark fruit on the palate lent additional interest with  spice from the oak. It can certainly be opened and relished right now – particularly, they suggest, paired with the farm’s  Black Angus biltong – or any other cuts of their pasture-fed free-ranging herd and source of the beef in the restaurants. Alcohol levels are 14%, the cellar door price is R140 and if this wine was to spend another year or two in cool darkness, it is sure to improve even further.

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 The release of the latest vintage of Delheim Grand Reserve is an event that connoisseurs wait for and collectors snap up.

 

The 2014 vintage marks a remarkable 36 years since the cellar introduced their flagship range and celebrates its reputation for pampering some of the finest Cabernet Sauvignon in the Simonsberg sub-region. Cab makes up 85% of the Reserve, with 10% Cabernet Franc and remaining 5% of Merlot contributing to the final blend, an impressive combo of finely tuned structure and elegance.

 

 

Winemaker Altus Treurnicht harvested the estate’s five-star Cabernet grapes, added the Cab Franc from the Vaaldraai block and Merlot from Peperboom at the foot of Klapmutskop. The wine spent 16 months in French oak before being bottled but will go on getting better and better for up to another decade for those winelovers with patience and access to dark, cool places.

 

It is already more than enjoyable, delicious ruby hues offering up complex aromas of berry and spice. On the palate the tannins are robust but contained, the wine is smooth with fruit that comes to the fore in a balanced and pleasing mouthfeel and long finish.

 

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It sells for R285 from the farm and makes a fine companion to gourmet meals where red meat takes centre stage. It also makes an appetising gift for someone who will appreciate its many charms and future promise.

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It’s always a special occasion when La Motte releases a new edition of their Hanneli R, a flagship tribute to the estate owner that is only produced during exceptional harvests. As

The 2012 vintage matured in French oak for more than three years, then was cellared on the farm for a further four years before being released as it nears its peak. That said, collectors will argue that they will squirrel their case away for a further four years to demonstrate how the wine will scale ever further heights to delight connoisseurs.

The Hanneli R 2012 consists of 60% Syrah, 30% Grenache and is finished with 10% Petite Sirah. Half the Shiraz came from Franschhoek, the other half from Elim. Walker Bay supplied the Grenache and Franschhoek the Petite Sirah, a southern French cultivar that is a cross of Syrah and Peloursin that produces tannic, long-lived wines. It occupies a miniscule 0.02% of our vineyard area.

This is a wine to open with great expectations  which are sure to be met, given the talent and sources behind it. It offers  beautifully expressed complexity and is as elegant as it is excellent. First impressions are that the tannins dominate, but the fruit comes through on the palate along with welcome freshness, balanced with the richness which one expects. If there is some over, the enjoyment is likely to be increased when more glasses are poured the following day, a bonus to be appreciated.

Just 3 600 bottles were produced, which increases its appeal to those who demand the best, from the Cape, from France, or wherever the  Old or New World produces outstanding wines.

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this is a wine to grace the table when memorable events and occasions are celebrated – when the menu is geared to the wine, rather than the other way round. What better place to do this than book a table at La Motte’s delightful Pierneef restaurant and select a main course from Michelle’s menu  that will be further enhanced by this worthy wine. Now, next year or any time up to 2022 ....

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There’s just one day to go before Heritage month comes to an end, and I still have several new wines to report on that reached me before this unique trio did. But, because these are so connected to our Cape history in terms of viticulture, architecture and hospitality – not to forget the Matieland aspect -  I am breaking my self-imposed rule to write about them first, before September has past.

 

Local and international travellers everywhere rave about Lanzerac – in terms of fine fare, iconic wines, or simply as one of the most beautiful of the many historic wine estates in Stellenbosch. Its cellar has been  renowned for perennially popular rosé, for pioneer pinotage, and more recently, for fine chardonnay, among others. Now cellarmaster  Wynand Lategan is offering the world of wine a new and maiden trio entitled the  Keldermeester Versameling, and this cellarmaster’s collection introduces several innovative touches – both the minimalistic front label and more informative back label use only Afrikaans, the heavy bottles are sealed with wax in good heritage style, and the contents consists of cultivars and combinations  not commonly found today.

One gets the sense that winemaker Wynand had a good time creating these wines, limited editions,  each one of which is linked to a renowned personality and to the University of Stellenbosch.

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The single white is a 2016  Pinot Blanc sourced from a single vineyard in the Jonkershoek Valley, making it something of a rarity in itself, as this grape occupies just 0.01% of vineyard area in south Africa. Its appealing name, BERGPAD, refers to the famous mountain path from the university sports grounds at Coetzenburg toward Lanzerac. The Italian varietal produces an appealing summer wine, this one at 14% alcohol levels on the high side, but which adds body: there is a slight hint of oiliness, reminiscent of Semillon as well. I did not get tasting notes, so don’t know details of the age of the vines and other factors.  Just over 1 000 bottles were produced, selling at R190.

Wynand repeats viticultural history with his 2016 blend entitled PROF – it’s a tribute to the renowned academic Prof Abraham Perold who created Pinotage by crossing Cinsaut, then called Hermitage, with Pinot Noir back in 1925. Why, we are not sure, but today the result, along with Chenin blanc, are the two cultivars  that overseas gurus are naming as the iconic South African pair producing the most exciting and pleasing wines . Prof Perold cultivated the first Pinotage vines, but, sadly,  never tasted the maiden bottled wine. Today’s blend of 60% Cinsaut and 40% Pinot fills just more than 1 000 bottles,  and sells for R310, which is not a bad price for recreated history in a bottle.

And finally, we have DOK, a 2015 Malbec sourced from a single vineyard in the Jonkershoek valley. This diminutive term, usually of affection,  refers to a doctor and was always used back in the last century when Afrikaners were talking about legendary rugby giant Dr Danie Craven. He regularly visited Lanzerac with his dog Bliksem in tow, and I remember my mother revealing, in a rare moment about her youth, that she and he went on a couple of dates at some stage.  DOK, just over 1 000 bottles, sells at R280 from  the farm.

 

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The bottles are numbered and signed by Lategan, the stock is limited to the farm, selling from the Lanzerac tasting room, while members of the Lanzerac Wine Club also have access to this trio, which is going to make a talking point for summer affairs this festive season, and a nostalgic one for oldtimers who know and revere the historic heart of Stellenbosch. 

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As Heritage month heads to a climax with the public holiday - and a long weekend to boot – we know that millions of South Africans will be lighting braai fires across the nine provinces as the recent tradition of combining heritage with a National Braai Day as been enthusiastically adopted.

Round many a fire family, friends and cooks will be clutching glasses of good Cape wine – both to celebrate the occasion and to accompany the brunch, lunch or supper feast sizzling over the coals.

Some of our cellars have established a heritage legacy through their history, having been in existence for more than 300 years. Others have done so through their products, that have become renowned as wines with a long tradition. Nuy Winery falls into the latter class, having produced fine muscadels since their inception in 1963. Hardly a year passes without these fortified dessert wines being rated as best in the country, both white and red. Former cellarmaster Wilhelm Linde (1971 – 2003 is widely credited with being responsible for the impressive increase in quality of muscadel at Nuy, something that present cellarmaster Christo Pienaar upholds and carries forward.

This month muscadel fans can invest in a case of of Nuy muscadel wines with five year intervals between vintages from 1991 to 2016 along with a 2006 white muscadel. Only 15 of these heritage cases will be released during September, each packed in a wooden case made for the occasion. This heirloom collection costs R1500.

Meanwhile, Nuy has also been increasing its range of wines from other cultivars over the last couple of decades, and one of these, the Mastery range has acquired a sauvignon blanc 2017, just released in time for spring flings. Moderate alcohol levels at just over 13, the back label uses Afrikaans to describe the wine as presenting tropical fruit aromas followed by a combination of fruit on the palate and having a long finish. I found the nose quite shy, but the palate full and fruity with a silkiness that lingered. Mixed fruit, yes, with a little passionfruit and lime, balanced by the freshness of youth and no searing acidity.  Slips down agreeably, both as a aperitif and a companion to a range of summer fare/

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A group of us from the McGregor Heritage society recently lunched at the Nuy hilltop restaurant and I’m pleased to report it's maintaining its well-deserved reputation for both cuisine and service, although the prices have risen. (What hasn’t, I hear you mutter).

 

Earlier this year cellarmaster Christo Pienaar was elected the new chairman of the SA National Wine Show Association, replacing Charles Hopkins who retired after a five-year stint. Pienaar is well qualified to take over, and has been actively involved in the Association for more than a decade.

 

All in all Nuy’s tasting centre and bistro, with its panoramic views, provides both an outlet for some notable wines and spirits, and offers a delectable oasis in the gastronomic desert that exists on the R60 between Worcester and Rooiberg.

 

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Spring has sprung, Heritage Weekend beckons, and the choice of fine wine and food fests, country markets and elegant tasting affairs grows ever wider, across the Western Cape with one in Gauteng. Get your diaries out soon and contemplate these events, here in date order.

COUNTRY MARKET AT GROOTE POST

 

 

Groote Post’s monthly Country Market takes place on Sunday September 24 over the Heritage long weekend. As before, visitors can indulge a wonderful selection of artisanal food and homeware, the estate wines, while children have a host of activities to keep them happy. Entrance is free. For more info contact

I Love Yzer: 022 451 2202 or info@iloveyzer.co.za

www.grootepostcountrymarket.co.za · Facebook.com/GrootePostCountryMarket

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USANA FARM FEAST AT KLEIN WELMOED

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An authentic farm experience awaits visitors to Klein Welmoed outside Stellenbosch over the weekend of October 7 – 8. Bring the family to the Usana Farm Feast and unwind with fine wines, delicious food, and visits to cows, hens and other animals. Plenty of entertainment for all ages. Tickets cost R390 a head which includes lunch, wine-tasting and voucher for discounting wines purchased. Children under 13 and over 7 pay R 80. Prebook via

www.webtickets.co.za to avoid disappointment as limited tickets are available.

 For more information contact us at info@usana.co.za.

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Celebrate International Pinotage Day with Lanzerac Wine Estate

What better way to pay homage to South Africa’s unique grape varietal than at the home of the world’s first Pinotage - Lanzerac Wine Estate in Stellenbosch. Join in the fun and festivities on Saturday, 14 October, for an unforgettable Pinotage Day experience where live music, superb wines and a Pinotage-inspired menu!

  • Lanzerac vertical Pinotage tasting presented by Cellar Master, Wynand Lategan, at 11h00 and 13h00.
  • Stock up on Lanzerac’s acclaimed wines for the festive season. Visitors to the Estate will qualify for a 20% discount when purchasing Lanzerac Pinotage or Lanzerac Pinotage Rosé on the day. 
  • Pinotage picnic baskets will be available to pre-order and enjoy on the day at a cost of R400 per couple. Filled to the brim with delectabledelights and a bottle of Lanzerac Pinotage Rosé. Enjoy your picnic under the giant Oaks in the Deli courtyard or on the picnic terrace overlooking the mountains and vineyards. 
  • The Lanzerac Deli adjacent to the Tasting Room will cater with its Pinotage-inspired menu. Guests can look forward to fresh oysters with Pinotage caviar, Pinotage and rosemary glazed lambburgers, cheese and charcuterie platters and delicious gourmet mini pizzas for the little ones. Executive Chef Stephen Fraser uses only the freshest, locally sourced produce to create artisanal and wholesome meals guaranteed to whet any appetite. 

Entry to Lanzerac is free of charge, but bookings for the vertical Pinotage tasting, Pinotage picnic baskets or the Lanzerac Deli is essential. 

For more information about Lanzerac’s International Pinotage Day festivities contact Zia van Rooyen du Toit at zia@lanzerac.co.za.

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ROBERTSON VALLEY WINE ON THE RIVER


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One of the most popular festivals in the winelands will take place for the 12th successive year over the weekend of October 20 – 22. Wine on the River takes place at Goudmyn farm along the banks of the Breede river, when  the valley winemakers, chefs, producers come together to offer hospitality to visitors from near and far – and often from overseas as well.

New vintages and old favourites from about 30 cellars will be poured.  An irresistible array of brunch and lunch items, simple and trad, trendy and sophisticated, will be served up from a host of stalls  while youngsters can enjoy horse and tractor rides, boat cruises and more. Interactive wine tastings focusing on specific cultivar are offered for winelovers wanting to learn more.  The annual Duck Derby, which raises funds for the Bonnie-People Project in Bonnievale takes place on the Sunday when it’s hoped to raise more than R250 000, last year’s target. Wines will be sold at cellar door prices, so stock up for the festive season and save!


Entrance ticket prices vary from R120 - R280 and children under 18 go in free of charge.  Early Bird Weekend ticket runs till 30 September 2017 for R250pp. Interactive wine tastings at R70pp per slot. All available at Webtickets under the Wine on the River page.

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 RMB WINEX 2017

 

RMB WineX – Jozi’s largest, most enduring and supremely elegant wine show – returns to the Sandton Convention Centre from 25 - 27 October 2017.  Feast your wine soul on the greatest selection of wines under one roof – from the most classical styles to the avant-garde; around 800 wines, artisanal products and accessories from 150 exhibitors are sure to delight all who love wine.  Bespoke tastings, product launches, wine route promotions and art displays are designed to enhance the WineX-lover’s experience of the exciting world of all things vinous. And, the Mastrantonio emporium caters for show visitors ‘on the move’ with easy-to-eat deli meals and sumptuous refreshments. 

Dates: Wednesday 25 to Friday 27 October 2017

Venue: The Pavilion, Sandton Convention Centre, Maude Street, Sandton

Time: 17h00 to 21h00 each night

Bookings:  Book all tickets and packages online via www.computicket.com or call 0861 915 8000. Use the “Print at home” facility for easy access to tickets.

Tickets: Via computicket.com: Early Bird price from R165 to R190 for bookings by 13 October; thereafter and at the door, from R185 to R220   No entry for under 18s, babies or prams. 

Getting there and home:

  • Gautrain (www.gautrain.co.za): Visitors from Pretoria in the North and Benoni in the East catch the train and walk to the Sandton Convention Centre.
  • Uber, or see the website for other responsible rides.

 

Event Queries: See www.winex.co.za for all details, list of exhibitors and wines in the lead-up to the show, and to register for Shop@Show.  Follow on Facebook and Twitter @RMBWineX  #RMBWineX2017 #DiscoverYourTaste

Contact: OutSorceress Marketing, telephone 011 482 5936 or email winex@outsorceress.co.za.

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Season of Sauvignon

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The Durbanville Wine Valley is ready to welcome visitors and festival goers to Visit Sauvignon Country at the annual Season of Sauvignon festival 28 - 29 October.  The Durbanville Wine Valley is renowned as an excellent Sauvignon Blanc area and is one of Cape Town’s ‘must-visit’ wine destinations.

The valleys  11 prestigious wine farms,  - Altydgedacht, D’Aria, Diemersdal, De Grendel, Durbanville Hills, Hillcrest, Klein Roosboom, Meerendal, Nitida, Groot Phizantekraal and Signal Gun  - will each be celebrating the start of white wine season in their own individual style. Each winery has its own charm with superb entertainment for adults and children alike.

Festival-goers will guided through the festival offering with a detailed festival program that will be available on www.durbanvillewine.co.zafrom 1 August. Prebook festival tickets via www.webtickets.co.za from 1 August. 

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Curry: Stories & Recipes across South Africa, by Ishay Govender-Ypma. Published by Human & Rousseau, 2017.

 

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An important culinary addition to our indigenous literature was celebrated with the launch of this impressive hardback, its gold design and lettering on the front cover adding decorative gravitas to the contents within. The endpapers inspire with little bowls of spices, pounded and powdered, to be mixed into the aromatic collection that will flavour the veggies, meat, fish and  poultry that simmer in a variety of pots across our country.

Journalist Ishay added a note to reviewers that arrived with the book, telling us of the fulfilling year she spent travelling to towns and townships, cities and farms across South Africa in search of every version of curry that is served up by our diverse communities. She enjoyed great hospitality, entered into an exploration of our past, and unearthed an extraordinary collection of stories and recipes to present to readers in this treasury. As is increasingly becoming common with current South African cookbooks, the stories often centre around hardship – from poverty and more often about suffering under apartheid laws, homes lost under the Group Areas act even as family cooks continued to make food, stretching ingredients, and keeping treats for special occasions.

Close to 90 recipes share the pages between the fascinating story of curry, related by cooks and experts, in every corner of the country. Crab curry from KwaZulu-Natal,. Cape Malay chicken curry, curried offal  from the Northern Cape, beef from Gauteng townships. You will find Karoo venison curries, lamb for the kerkbasaar, and curries featuring vegetables and fruits that are worth contemplating – and not only by vegetarians.

We follow Ishay’s journey through all nine provinces of South Africa. Indian home cooks predominate, unsurprisingly, in every region except for the Western  Cape where we find residents who specialise in Cape Malay cuisine, well-known cook and author Sydda Essop, weskus family cook Lenora Farmer from Paternoster, renowned spice guru Cass Abrahams, Afrikaans creative cook Inez Espost and an English-speaking restaurateur in Knysna who presents the only Thai curry in the book – the final recipe! Also featured is Emily van Sitters of Franschhoek who  I met when collecting recipes for a Cape cookbook way back when. She shared her recipe for seafood masala bobotie, still the finest bobotie dish ever  tasted.

The many black cooks, mostly women, use fewer spices in their curries, although some, like Lisbeth Mametja, of North Sotho origin, living in Hoedspruit, cooks a mean Indian curry thanks to working at game lodge with a chef from  Mumbai. Along with mutton, lamb and many chicken curries, there is a fine selection of meat-free recipes, where veggies, fruit,  pulses, soya, nuts and paneer star, along with  some interesting seafood curries. The recipes conclude with a selection of side dishes to complement curries, including roti, samp, sambals,pickles and atchars.-

This compilation is  set to become a South African classic, and one which even novice cooks can buy knowing that the recipes were all re-tested by Ishay’s husband to make sure they would be in safe hands when trying out a new dish. Now there’s dedication worth acknowledging!

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Fun! Affordable!  Informal!

That’s the promise from the chefs and caterers, winemakers and hosts of the village of McGregor who are gearing up to welcome visitors during their 2017 Food and Wine fest.

 

Head to the valley along roads fringed with daisies in pastel hues. Cross the Breede river  and cruise along the road to nowhere – until your reach the marketplace in Church street, where the church spire gazes down on tents and stalls, musicians and cooks, as enticing  aromas of fare both local and exotic drift skywards,  offering irresistible temptation.

Tasting glass in hand, sample the new vintages of no less than seven cellars that line the McGregor wine route, and treat your palate to some fine wines, every one of which is created in the valley. The range extends from a choice of bubbly to organic whites, riveting rosé, award-winning reds, warming soetes and world- class grappas and eaux de vies. Stock up for the festive season at prices to please both palate and purse.

The following cellars will be pouring their wines; 

 

Tanagra (don't miss the cab franc); Donkey Sanctuary (off-dry colombar is popular), McGregorWines (good affordable reds), Bemind (cinsaut is a must), Solara (delicious organic s/blanc), Lords (bubbly and new s'blanc) and Buffalo Creek.

Bring the family, as youngsters will be well-catered for – and will be cooking up a storm themselves – under the watchful eye of an experienced teacher. Adults can relish oysters, schwarmas, curry, samoosas and hamburgers, or settle for heritage treats like roosterkoek and boerie rolls, followed by pastries and pancakes.

Bring a basket to take home artisanal fare, and browse among local crafts for gorgeous hessian bags of aromatic herbes de Provence. Choose favourites  from a brand new range of souvenir keyrings and fridge magnets illustrating McGregor’s landscapes,  flora, heritage homes, gardens and more.

Come for the day, or make a weekend of it and revel in the peace  of  traffic-free roads under starry night skies. Bring your hiking boots, your bikes, and savour handmade hospitality during a memorable taste of McGregor

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The festival runs from 10am – 4pm on Saturday September 30. Tickets, which include a wine glass and 10 tastings, cost R80 a head. For more info, and to book tickets, call 023 625 1954 or send an e-mail to info@tourismmcgregor.co.zaTanagra

 

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