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Posted by on in Reviews

Let no one say that South African cookbook writers and publishers are not up there with the best when it comes to including current culinary trends . While some techniques that are in vogue are best left to chefs in high-tech kitchens, others can be easily practised by keen cooks and dedicated braai masters and mistresses.

Think smoking, curing, pickling, fermenting, foraging - venerable processes which have come full circle and are now trending. Add to that list the ongoing focus on healthy eating, using sustainably grown or produced ingredients, plus welcome environmental savvy by insisting on ingredients in season and we have a good summary of the current food spectrum.

From the pyramid of local cookbooks that have hit the shelves recently, five titles feature below: digest the brief round-up of their contents and decide which title(s) you would like to own.

 

 A Year of Seasonal dishes from Food & Home Entertaining. Published by Human & Rousseau 2016.

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Food & Home Entertaining is renowned for supplying fans with imaginative recipes for every course and occasion. This substantial compilation is organised according to month, making it easy to find ideas for both seasonal meals and entertaining menus. The well-illustrated recipes comprise the best of those published over the last decade. Diversity is the keynote, with dishes that take five minutes to assemble (Parma ham, blueberry and feta salad for high summer) to a gluten-free chocolate torte that replaces wheat with an egg-rich chocolaty ground almond batter. A few vegan options, several vegetarian recipes and many with Asian influence can be found. I particularly like their combination of sustainably farmed kabeljou with a trendy achar of guava, teamed with a spring salad and ciabatta toast. Cooks have the option of braai-ing or frying the fish and toast .

 

Baking with Jackie Cameron, published by Penguin Books, 2016.

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Chef Cameron is not only a great baker, but all-round talented cook, who opened her own internationally-recognised school of food and wine last year. In this mouthwatering collection of biscuits and breads, pies and tarts, cakes large and small and desserts and puds, the focus is less on trends and more on absolute delicious bakes, whatever course they serve.

However, Jackie is not immune to what’s in vogue and offers us gluten-free bread, and one based on   the indigenous tuber amadumbe. (Sweet potato can be substituted). Her red velvet cake adds cocoa to increase its appeal. She gives crème brulée a local twist by flavouring it with Amarula cream liqueur, and includes trad favourites like malva pud, melktert, millionaires shortbread and even an upmarket version of peppermint t crisp tart. The small selection of savoury tarts and pies is particularly appetising. This is an appealing, crisply designed compilation, that will be well used in every kitchen it finds itself.

 

One Pot Pan Tray by Mari-Louis Guy and Callie Maritz. Published by Human & Rousseau, 2016.

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Ever since this brother and sister team burst onto the gastronomic scene with an extravagant collection of bakes back in 2011, they haven’t paused, producing several more successful titles . In this colourful compilation they assemble whole meals in a pot, a frying pan or roasting dish, saving on labour and washing-up. The contents stay with savoury fare based on red meat, chicken, seafood, bacon and ham as well as meat-free suppers, each dish balanced with both a carb and veggies.

We find traditional boerekos favourites (curried banana meatball bake, teamed with butternut chunks and quartered red onions) along with baked chicken, mushroom and leek pasta topped with cheese sauce, and a Iberian-inspired bake of sardines and potatoes, flavoured with tomatoes, peppers and paprika and sauced with lemony olive oil. There are a few soups, and the haloumi and vegetable bake offers a delectable combination of fresh asparagus, baby marrows and onion mixed with the cheese, flavoured with citrus and oregano, spiked with jalapenos and garlic. It seems to sing of spring, and is adaptable – replace pricey asparagus with spring onions, for example.

 

All Sorts of Salads by Chantal Lascaris. Published by Struik Lifestyle 2016.

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This compact softback is both a convenient size for kitchen use and a practical and useful collection. The author came to entertaining and cooking after moving from corporate business to become a pilates instructor and developing interests in both health and salads, which feature high in her diet. The recipes tried and tweaked coincide, quite accidentally, with today’s culinary trend: Their simplicity is part of their attraction. Old favourites in new guises sees up –to- date versions of coleslaw, potato, Caesar, Waldorf and three-bean salads. The substantial vegetarian chapter includes some trendy combinations like beetroot, quinoa and rocket, and cauliflower, butter bean and feta.

Fish and seafood star in summery combinations – think grilled tuna steaks and nectarine salsa , salmon and pistachio, even a fish cake salad, complete with sweet potato chips and mixed salad. Calamari is teamed with chorizo and chickpea in an Iberian charmer. Meaty salads presents main courses packed with protein plus healthy green for all-round fare, such as the Med mini-keftedes teamed with tzatziki and salad.

 

Carmen’s Best Recipes by Carmen Niehaus. Published by Human & Rousseau, 2016

.b2ap3_thumbnail_CKBK-TRENDS-Banting-lasagne.jpgBanting lasagne from Carmen Niehaus

Food writer Carmen Niehaus has been supplying her many readers with flavourful, reliable family recipes for 25 years, and has developed a vast collection in the process. Having to select 100 for this cookbook, she finally settled on 10 chapters of 10 recipes, based on criteria like family favourites, recipes with reduced carb content, many starring veggies and salad ingredients. There are a few breakfast and light meal options along with those suitable for every course on the menu. Practical tips accompany every one, as do appetising colour photographs. Her fans will be pleased with this souvenir, that also caters for slimmers – see her Banting lasagna – which replaces pasta with aubergine and omits the white sauce without going overboard with weird substitutions.

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Always exciting to unearth a winery new to one - and when I received a trio of Groenland wines I found that this Bottelary farm was one I did not know existed, even though it's near well-known cellars like Hazendal.  b2ap3_thumbnail_GROENLAND-2Steenkamp-bottle-shot-NV-resized.jpg

Turning to Platter I found that the Steenkamp family has been farming there since 1932 but only produced their first wine just under 20 years ago.

They now have more than 150ha under red and white cultivars and produce 13 000 cases of wine annually.

There are three ranges: Premium conisting of four reds, all four-star rated,  Classic – which includes a frisky green, slightly dusty sauvignon blanc which I enjoyed -  as well as a cab, shiraz and red blend, and the Landskap range – a 2015 chenin (which was fresh, accessible and very pleasant) and a shiraz-merlot blend.

In July they - father Kosie and son Piet - released a flagship 2013 Bordeaux-style blend, called simply Steenkamp, in honour of  Kosie Steenkamp, the family patriarch. This is a deep, dark wine, well-balanced, with fruit and tannins presenting in appealing meld. It opened up nicely in the glass, and will surely go on improving for several years.

While the limited edition Steenkamp sells for R285 in keeping with its status, the other Groenland wines offer excellent value for money – the Landskap chenin is R37, the Classic sauvignon blanc R49 and two award-winning shiraz (which I haven’t tasted) are R64 and R115 respectively.

The emphasis at Groenland is on friendliness, old-fashioned hospitality and a complete lack of pretension. Sounds like my kind of venue and my favourite sort of people. Their website www.groenland.co.za is very informative.

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Franschhoek Uncorked Festival

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Celebrate SA heritage over a glass or two of Franschhoek wines, and pair them  with delicious food cooked over an open flame during the Franschhoek Uncorked festival and  Braai4Heritage weekend, September 24 - 5.

Visitors can meander from farm to farm where festival offerings abound. Avoid the queues and pre-book your Uncorked Weekend Pass through www.webtickets.co.za. Tickets cost R140 per person and allows  access to all  participating wine farms as well as a complimentary tasting glass and free wine tastings. Outdoor enthusiasts can take part in a selection of outdoor activities  during the weekend. . For more info contact the Franschhoek Wine Valley offices on 021 876 2861 or visit www.franschhoekuncorked.co.za for a list of participating farms.

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Come and celebrate our Heritage in a fun, colourful and vibrant way this year at Imbuko Wines!!!

 

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On September 24th Imbuko will be hosting their 6th Annual Imbuko Heritage Day/Braai Day on  National Heritage day - uniting around fires, preparing great feasts, sharing our heritage and waving our flag.

This is a Wellington farm and there are directions on their website.

This year there will be 4  Wine Brand Pods illustrating the diversity and innovation of their wines: Du Plevaux Wine with black & white theme, Imbuko Wine illustrating Africa  Pomula Wine Spritzers with a beach pastel theme and Van Zijls wine illustrating holidays in the Hamptons!
Guests will be entertained by  local South African artists, Newton & Co. & Gerry Liberty. Delicious eats & treats will be provided by some of SA’ s best food trucks including pulled Pork Burgers & Smoked Beef Brisket, Wood-fired Pizzas, Calamari, Mediterranean Pita’s and Gourmet Biltong Pies  For the little ones there will be a Kids Zone filled with entertainment .

Tickets costs only R125 per adult – Include free Wine Glass + 4 Glasses of Wine (one at each Brand Pod). Children under 18 enter free of charge. Tickets:
ADULT ENTRY - R125pp (incl Free Wine Glass & 4 glasses of Wine - one at each Brand Pod!) Ticket Sales open on Friday 29 July.
www.webtickets.co.za

KIDS ENTRY - Free

Event starts at 10am and ends at 5pm. The first 100 guests receive a FREE goodie bag.

For more info visit
www.imbuko.co.za

#imbukohday2016

Ps. There is only 500 tickets available.
Last year it was sold out before the event, so dont delay.PizzPizzP
First 100 guests to arrive on the day will get a goody bag filled with delicious truly SA products. Tickets can be purchased at www.webtickets.co.za or at your local Pick & Pay. Only 500 tickets available and they usually sells out weeks before.For more info you can visit their website www.imbuko.co.za

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JAVA MTB CHALLENGE 2016 ADDS NEW TERRITORY TO THE MIX OF FAMILY FUN

b2ap3_thumbnail_Robertson-winery-River-and-vineyard.jpgThe annual Van Loveren Java MTB Challenge offers  fresh challenges to adrenalin-seekers who sign up for the event taking place near Robertson on Saturday, October 1 this year. Not only mountain biking, but there's also a 10km trail running competition across  farmland and mountains as well as food stalls, music and wine tasting. The centre of activities is  the Van Loveren Family Vineyards' four MTB routes, varying in distance between 8 and 85km. Prizes and lucky draws to the value of over R 40 000 await winner.

.The 8km route is an easy, non-technical fun ride that’s suitable for children. The 20km is ideal for beginners and lies mostly along a jeep track with some single track. The 45km is suitable for an intermediate level of experience, taking riders over elevation variance of 800m. The 85km route however, is gruelling and should be attempted only by very experienced riders. The 1600m elevation will challenge even the most seasoned riders.

By entering the events, participants support very worthy causes. The Java MTB Challenge is a fundraising platform for local schools and charitable organisations. Beneficiaries for this year’s event are Robertson Primary School, Robertson Preparatory School, Goudmyn Rural School and Wakkerstroom Rural School.

For more information, visit www.javamtb.co.za or contact Johan Rossouw on java@vanloveren.co.za or 023-6151505

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HOT SUNDAYS, COOL JAZZ, FINE FARE

Enjoy a lavish Sunday Jazz brunch at Taj Cape Town

 

The five-star hotel Taj Cape Town invites guests to join them for a lavish Jazz Brunch on the first Sunday of the month, starting on October 1. Choose from Mint the Grill restaurant or the opulent Lobby Lounge. Proceedings start with sparkling wine, then choose from breakfat items or oysters, prawn cocktails or the roast at the Carvery.

This is a family-friendly hotel, so there's a children' menus on offer as well.

The event takes place on October 02, November 06 and December 04.

To book call Taj Cape Town on 021 819 2000 or email restaurants.capetown@tajhotels.com

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INAUGURAL ELGIN CHARDONNAY COLLOQUIUM

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 , Wines of Elgin will host their inaugural Elgin Chardonnay Colloquium over the weekend of Friday, 7th October and Saturday 8th October 2016.  Guests are invited to join Almenkerk, Boschendal, Charles Fox MCC, Corder, Elgin Vintners, Highlands Rd, Iona, Lothian, Mathew van Heerden, Neil Ellis, Oak Valley, Oneiric, Paul Cluver Wines, Richard Kershaw Wines, South Hill and Sutherland as they showcase their Elgin Chardonnay’s with a selection of the best from around the world. A seminar and tutored tasting featuring top quality international and Elgin Chardonnays takes place on Friday, 7th October, hosted by Jamie Goode, a London-based wine writer, lecturer and respected wine judge.  This will be followed by a gala dinner  at Rockhaven, a beautiful venue in the Elgin Valley.

On Saturday, 8th October, visitors can choose from one of three morning and from one of the four lunch events  co- hosted by participating producers  .The full programme and listing of wines can be found at chardonnay.winesofelgin.co.za or by emailing info@winesofelgin.co.za Tickets are limited so please book early if you would like to attend.

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Season of Sauvignon 29 & 30 October 20

 

 

The Season of Sauvignon Festival is back in the Durbanville Wine Valley over the weekend of 29 - 30 October.

Sauvignon Blanc lovers can expect  to a host of Sauvignon Blanc activities in the Valley throughout  October in the buildup to the festival..

Altydgedacht, Bloemendal, D’Aria, Diemersdal, De Grendel, Durbanville Hills, Hillcrest, Klein Roosboom, Meerendal, Nitida, Groot Phizantekraal and Signal Gun will all celebrate the white wine season in their own individual style. Visitors can look forward to Sauvignon Blanc inspired menus in the restaurants, Sauvignon Blanc tutored tastings in the Tasting Rooms, fashion and art events as well as the chance to taste the variety of styles of Sauvignon Blanc produced in this picture perfect Valley.

The weekend Ffestivities  on 1 October will see each of the participating farms  present the Valley Tasting in their  Tasting Rooms whilst tasting the Sauvignon Blancs of all 12 producers. The tasting costs R50 per perso

Visitors will be among the first to taste and purchase the Durbanville Twelve Sauvignon Blanc 2016. This wine, produced by the Durbanville Wine Valley from a ton of grapes from each of the 12 farms, will be available during the Season of Sauvignon and afterwards for sale from each.

A detailed festival programme and information on ticket sales will be available on www.durbanvillewine.co.za from 1 September. For more information contact Angela Fourie events@durbanvillewine.co.za or 083 310 1228.

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Congrats to the winners of the Chenin Blanc, Pinotage and Terroir Awards announced recently.

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As usual the Standard Bank Chenin Blanc Top 10 award function was a stylish affair, held again at Delaire Graff estate. The lunch menu was particularly long and I had to miss out on some courses and tastings of the accompanying winning wines, but those I tried were both exciting and delicious chenins. Sitting next to Lizelle Gerber was enjoyable as her winner was the first to be served with a cured salmon starter, and it was great to see her Boschendal chenins  making it into the Top 10.

As in previous years, diversity, purity of fruit, more texture and greater structure were characteristics of the winning wines. A total of 124 were entered and seven of the 2016 Top 10 were previous winners. On a personal note, I did not think that the difference in price between several mid-priced  winners and the most expensive chenin was justified.

All the Top 10 winners are donating their prize money to various charities and worthy courses in their areas including Sunfield Home, the Du Toitskloof DGB Mobile Library, the Anna Foundation, Kusasa, The Agroecology Academy and crèches in Mbekweni and at Allée Bleue

 For Ken Forrester, Chairman of the Chenin Blanc Association, this year’s line-up and the overall quality is proof that Chenin is going places. “Across the board the wines are world class.  This is the most excited I’ve ever been for Chenin in South Africa”. 

 For more information, visit www.chenin.co.za.

The winning wines:

Allée Bleue 2015

Price: R65

Total production: 7 500 bottles

93% Chenin Blanc, 7% Viognier from Franschhoek and Walker Bay vineyards. Matured in 400-litre French oak barrels, 20% new. Citrus and white peach plus a hint of vanilla. Pure and focused with bright acidity before a savoury finish.

Bellingham The Bernard Series Old Vine 2015

Price: R160

Total production: 60 000 bottles

From Agter-Paarl, Bottelary and Durbanville vineyards, with an average age of 45 years. Matured for 12 months in French oak, 50% new. Stone fruit, spice as well as lots of yeasty complexity on the nose. Rich and broad on the palate, the finish long and savoury.

Boschendal Sommelier Selection 2015

Price: R85

Total production: 12 000 bottles

From old Agter Paarl, Bottelary and Somerset West vineyards. Largely unwooded, 15% fermented in oak. The nose shows a fynbos top note before pear, citrus, white peach and a hint of spice. Excellent fruit concentration and particularly bright acidity before a long and pithy finish.

DeMorgenzon Reserve 2015

Price: R225

Total production: 18 500 bottles

From Stellenbosch vines planted in 1972. Matured for 11 months in French oak, 25% new. Citrus, stone fruit and spice on the nose. Rich but impeccably balanced – possesses both depth and breadth, tangy acidity ensuring refreshment.

Kleine Zalze Family Reserve 2015

Price: R160

Total production: 16 374 bottles

From three different wards of Stellenbosch, vineyards approximately 35 years in age. Matured for eight months in old 400-litre French oak barrels.  A very attractive nose showing honeysuckle plus plenty of stone fruit and spice. The palate shows particular richness and intensity, the acidity nicely coated and the finish long and savoury.

Kleine Zalze Vineyard Selection Barrel Fermented 2015

Price: R80

Total production: 66 613 bottles

From Stellenbosch vineyards ranging from 25 to 40 years old. Matured for six months in old 400-litre French oak barrels. Flowers, pear, citrus and white peach plus a little spice on the nose. Lovely fruit purity and zesty acidity making for a very well-balanced wine.

Leopard’s Leap Culinaria Collection 2015

Price: R80

Total production: 6 000 bottles

From Voor-Paardeberg vineyards with an average age of 20 years. Matured in 500-litre French oak barrels, none new. A complex nose of potpourri, citrus and white peach plus an intriguing leesy note. The palate has a weightless intensity about it thanks to concentrated fruit and fresh acidity.

Perdeberg The Dry Land Collection Barrel Fermented 2015

Price: R77

Total production: 20 048 bottles

From two vineyards in the Agter Paarl area, one 26 years old and the other 32. Matured for 10 months in 500-litre French oak barrels, 20% new. A subtle but compelling nose showing flowers and dried herbs before pear, citrus and white peach. The palate shows great fruit purity and lovely freshness before an ultra-long finish.

Rijk’s Private Cellar Barrel Fermented 2013

Price: R140

Total production: 10 500 bottles

WO Tulbagh. Grapes from 17-year-old trellised vines and seven-year-old bush vines. 20% fermented in tank, 80% fermented and matured for 11 months in 300-litre French and Hungarian oak, 40% of which was new. Citrus and peach plus a little spice on the nose. Rich and full on the palate, the texture pleasantly oily with lively acidity lending balance.

Spier 21 Gables 2015

Price: R150

Total production: 32 808 bottles

From Tygerberg vineyards with an average age of 43 years. Matured for 14 months in a combination of 300-, 400-, 500- and 2 500-litre French oak barrels, 60% new. The nose shows citrus and peach plus a hint of vanilla and spice. The palate has a real succulence to the fruit and a pleasantly creamy texture while fresh acidity lends balance – a wine of precision.

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ABSA TOP 10 PINOTAGE AWARDS 2016

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The 20th Pinotage Award competition took place recently with 144 wines being judged and the results being announced last month at the Cavalli estate near Stellenbosch. Kanonkop and Rijk’s made history by both attracting their 11th Top 10 Award

Top 10 winners 2016:

2015

Diemersdal Pinotage Reserve

2014

Flagstone Writers Block Pinotage

2014

Fleur du Cap Pinotage Unfiltered

2010

Kanonkop Pinotage

2015

Knorhoek Two Cubs Pinotage

2013

KWV The Mentors Pinotage

2014

L'Avenir Single Block Pinotage

2014

Perdeberg The Dry Land Collection Pinotage

2013

Rijk's Reserve Pinotage

2015

Rooiberg Winery Reserve Pinotage

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SA Terroir Awards

After judging of a record 322 entries for the 11th Novare SA Terroir Wine Awards, two Cape estates stood out  with top achievements.

Bergsig Estate in the Breedekloof produced two National Winners for Top Red Blend with the Bergsig Icarus 2011, and for the Top Port-style wine with the Bergsig Cape LBV 2003. The latter was also adjudged one of the SA Terroir Top 5 Estate Wines and is the wine with the highest score among all the entries. In addition, another four wines from Bergsig received high scores and three of them were designated area winners.

Bergsig Estate took home both the Novare Trophy for the SA Terroir Top Wine Estate and the SA Terroir Top Producer.

Plenty more to digest on the website, which contains the complete results; visit www.terroirwineawards.co.za.

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THINK PINK, HULLO SPRING!

 

With a trio of rosés, two of them maiden vintages, arriving on my doorstep during an unseasonably warm spell, it is clearly time to welcome spring with fragrant aromas and mouthfuls of berry and melon flavours.

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First up is an appealing pink from Baleia Wines, their 2016 rosé, produced from syrah and enjoying a welcome low alcohol level of 12%. This is not just a pretty pink, but one that is crisp and dry, medium-bodied and with notable backbone alongside the more predictable flavours of strawberries dressed with black pepper.

This south coast olive farm and winery, not far from Riversdale where the Joubert family launched their first wines in 2011, now have a range comprising three reds and two whites, with a bubbly somewhere in the offing. The new rosé sells for R55 online.

Their extra virgin olive oil is a product to be sampled as well, already boasting two awards, the 2015 scooping silver in last years SA Olive Awards in the Intense category and also taking second place in the Medium Fruit category in the international Sol D’Oro contest. It consists of a blend of Frantoio, Coratina, FS17 and Leccino, offers the ideal base for your spring salad dressing, and costs R85 for 500ml.

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There’s a new addition to Steenberg’s covetable range, simply labelled “ROSE Syrah – Cinsault 2016.” The blend is 72 shiraz to 28% cinsaut and it’s a wine that will convert even non-pink drinkers, thanks to its persuasive charms. The nose hints at its shiraz character, and it’s crisp on the palate, with fruit upfront – mixed berries and rose petals, backed by a bouquet of herbs and discernible structure. Alcohol level is a moderate 13%. Selling at R80 from the cellar door, this is a pink to pair with gourmet picnics and al fresco lunches that start at noon and linger on to sunset.

Executive chef of the Steenberg Bistro Sixteen82 Kerry Kilpin recommends partnering this pink with her signature grilled chicken salad. Cool, but don’t over-chill – you will lose its appetising complexity of flavours.

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To conclude, a light-hearted salmon-hued frothy for the ladies who lunch (and picnic and gather for sundowners) the 2016 vintage of Stellenbosch Hills Polkadraai pinot noir rosé has made it debut alongside their new whites. With an alcohol level of just 10,5%, a second glass can be happily contemplated: the first can partner your spring salad, the second complement your strawberry pavlova. This is a sweet bubbly, but with zing to add fresh flavours of berries to the palate. It sells for R57, offering good value for many a summer celebration.

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Rain, sun, wind, snow - all is possible at this inconsistent season but the blossoms are out and the daisies are in full bloom and our vines are starting to bud. We have a family of three adult sheep and three lambs grazing at the bottom of our garden, and they seem impervious to whatever the weather throws at them, with the lambs growing at an astonishing rate.

Country and city events are on the Western Cape menu.

 

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GROOTE POST’S FIRST COUNTRY MARKET OF THE NEW SEASON

 SUNDAY 28th AUGUST FROM 10H00 TO 15H00

 Groote Post will be re-opening their popular country markets Sunday 28th August , followed by monthly markets on 25th September (spring market), 30th October, 27th November and 18th December (Christmas market).

Groote Post will again be a hive of activity, brimming with  artisan foods, arts and crafts, home-ware and décor, and of course, Groote Post’s well-loved wines as well as loads of kiddies’ activities. In addition, the August market will be featuring some exciting new stalls as well as live music by Francois Haasbroek.

Darling gourmet produceincluding: Darling Mushrooms, Weskus Worswa, Udderly Delicious Cheese, Darling Pomegranate Products, Saucy Boys’ organic preservative-free chilli sauces, marinades and spices, Darling Brew and more.

Groote Post’s award-winning restaurant, Hilda’s Kitchen, will be open as usual, but please note that booking is essential. The kids, as always, will be kept busy with a wide variety of kiddies’ activities - tractor rides, face-painting, water-balls, guided horse rides and, of course, the popular playground. Although pets are welcome – all dogs must be on a leash at all times.  Visitors arriving without their dogs on a leash will be given an option to buy one from the SPCA stall or hire one at the information stall. 

Entry to the Groote Post Country Market is free of charge.

For further information Contact Eldré Strydom: 082 877 6677 or eldre@iloveyzer.co.za

 

 

 

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Wine Concepts will host their 14th exclusive Seductive Sauvignons Festival at The Vineyard Hotel i

 

 

 This popular annual festival gives wine lovers the opportunity to taste a selection of flirtatious latest release Sauvignon Blanc’s and captivating current vintage Cabernet Sauvignons from over 40 of the country’s top producers. This year we will be including Bubblies, Rose’s and Dessert wines and there may even be an older vintage or two to savour in the line-up. Tempting and delicious snacks will be served with the wine throughout the evening.

 

All the showcased wines will be available for purchase at special prices from Wine Concepts on the evening.

 

Venue: The Vineyard Hotel, Colinton Road, Newlands,

 

Date: Friday 2nd September 2016

 

Time: 17.00 – 20.00

 

Cost: R200.00 per person – includes wine glass and light snacks

 

(Early Bird tickets @ R180.00)

 

Parking: At venue

 

The Vineyard Hotel is offering a special of a 2 course dinner in Square Restaurant, bed & breakfast for Single – R1 380; Double – R2 100

 

Tickets can conveniently be purchased via www.webtickets.co.za,   or at any of the Wine Concepts branches

 

Telephone Newlands at (021) 671 9030 or Kloof Street at (021) 426-4401

 

Email: admin@wineconcepts.co.za

 

or at the door on the evening subject to availability

 

http://www.wineconcepts.co.za

 

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A TREAT FROM TERROIR WITH ALTO'S FINE WINES

On the 1st of September 2016 Eat Out Top Ten Restaurant, Terroir, will join forces with Alto Wine Estate in creating a memorable evening of great food and wine. 

Terroir has earned a enviable reputation for outstanding and inventive contemporary cuisine and excellent service. Renowned Chef  Michael Broughton, sums up the philosophy behind the food at Terroir as follows: ‘It’s all about big bold flavours, where the basic ingredients in every dish are stretched to the top of their flavour profile’.

Guests will be treated to a three course dinner paired with exceptional wines selected by Alto winemaker, Bertho van der Westhuizen. A complimentary glass of Kleine Zalze’s MCC will be served.

At a cost of just R650 per person, seats are bound to fill up fast. Be sure to make your reservation by contacting Terroir at restaurant@kleinezalze.co.za or 021 880 8167 to avoid disappointment.

 

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South African wine industry directory 2016/17. Published by WineLand Media, 2016

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Doing the impossible, says editor Wanda Augustyn in her foreword, is how she and her team regard the annual production of the new edition. Dipping into  the new title, I can well understand why – it must be a mammoth task, updating such a complex and diverse treasury of information, figures, opinions, entries, graphs, indexes and more, keeping them accurate, and launching the tome around midyear. The result is an essential reference work for anyone remotely involved or interested in the wine industry, and a title I would hate to be without.

 

In the first section, An Overview of the SA wine industry subjects like a brief industry history, a 10-year ‘snapshot’ of progress, a harvest report and vintage guide are given. The following section, comprises details on the multitude of industry organizations and education bodies. This ranges across all aspects from agricultural to organisations focussing on responsible alcohol use. Details are listed of the associations concerned with one or another cultivar, and international wine industry bodies are also listed.

Section three lists awards and competitions - just the contents lists takes a full column on the page, and this is followed by a directory of wine writers, the shortest chapter. Grape Production is subdivided into cultivars, viticulture and regions, while the following chapter presents information on producers and wineries, including an index of brand names and lists of winemakers and viticulturists.

A guide to industry suppliers is up next, and the final section consists of more than 40 pages of industry statistics: the number of cellars in each region, the area under vines, producers income and prices, exports, consumption in South Africa and international comparison.

Hearty congratulations to the researchers, IT specialists, proof-readers and graphic designers who were part of this important collaboration, compendium and wine writers’ companion.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Oude-Molen-1.jpgOnce again, a fine Cape brandy has proved to the world of connoisseurs that top South African cognac-style brandies are up there with the best, and are, in some cases, judged as best in the world. In May this year it was the turn of Oude Molen's XO to bring home gold for its distillers, the only South African entry to win gold in the 2016 Global Spirits Masters.

This London based competition is renowned as impartial and credible, using only independent judges who rate entries through blind tastings.

It was, naturally, great news for Oude Molen distillery MD Andre Simonis, who emphasises that the description of Cape Brandy pays off in marketing both locally and in export markets.

But of course it's basically the impressive quality of this aristocratic spirit that attracts awards, and this is a brandy that offers consumers an almost overwhelming combination of aromas, fruit and layered flavours on the palate with a long, lingering finish. Grapes used in this distillation include colombar, chenin blanc and ugni blanc.

Tropical fruit dominates on the nose, with a little coconut discernible, while the palate will also detect stone fruit flavours, both fresh and dried, before the vanilla undertones from the oak add depth to the meld.

The fact that it is also encased in a beautiful bottle and presented in a stylish box add to the visual appeal and no doubt help account for a hefty retail price of R800. So, the average brandy lover is going to keep Oude Molen XO for auspicious occasions and use nothing except an ice block or two to dilute the mastery in the balloon.

Those consumers whose budget won't stretch to these heights can find more affordable pleasure in the consistently high quality of the Joseph Barry brandies, made at Barrydale, which, incidentally, brought home silver in the same international competition and are also products of the Edward Snell company.

There will be additional reasons to pause at this delightful Barrydale cellar soon as a restaurant is scheduled to open in spring. Apparently the delay is owing to waiting for approval of their liquor licence... a rather ironic situation one would think, given the site of the restaurant...

Meanwhile, hearty congrats to all concerned in the production of Oude Molen XO, available from the distillery in Elgin, as well as other liquor outlets. Edward Snell & Co is the largest family-owned wine and spirit merchant in South Africa.

 

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Love the Klein Karoo? Crazy about Calitzdorp? And you're a fan of those world-class ports and value-for-money  red and white wines? Then  plan a weekend trip to this hospitable part of the Cape, and indulge in an irresistible event  at De Krans cellars on Saturday August 27.

 

That's the date when the third Orchards in Bloom one-day fest takes place with a varied programme to suit all tastes and ages.

Chef Francois Ferreira will be pairing De Krans wines with biscotti at various times during the day. Early birds can jog or walk on the Vineyard Run from 9am, choosing from a five or 10km trail. There are wine prizes for winners. Walks through the orchards, which will be dressed in their pastel spring best  also tempt . Visitors can also help prune the young vines planted by previous guests at the spring festivals.

Chef Retief van der Walt will be cooking up delicious country meals in the De Krans Bistro and Deli from 9am - no reservations, so diners need to get there in good time.

Then, of course, there will be ample time to sip and sample the ranges from De Krans - newly released 2016 wines include chenin blanc, sauvignon blanc and moscato perle. Or if you are in the mood for a port-based cocktail, winemaker Louis van der Riet will be happy to oblige.

Family fun is guaranteed, and boules are offered for whose who wish to show off their prowess. For more info, email dekrans@mweb.co.za or contact Helet Viljoen on 044 213 3314.

Cellar news is that De Krans has just launched it maiden Pinotage Rose 2016: Selling at just under R60, this is a fresh, low-alcohol salmon pink wine, offering spring-like flavours of berries and cherries, and a hint of watermelon. Its a dry rose that can be sipped as an ode to spring, or paired with seafood and sushi.b2ap3_thumbnail_de-Krans-pinotage-rose_20160812-135418_1.jpg

b2ap3_thumbnail_De-Krans-Cape-vintage-port.jpgIf you, like me, are a firm fan of De Krans Tawny port, perhaps time to broaden our palates with the cellar's Cape Vintage 2013 port wine: Like the Tawny, its rated 4 and half stars in Platter, and easy to understand why. It seduces with aromas of red berries, vanilla and chocolate, leads on to mouthfuls of more berries, plums and dark chocolate flavours - wonderful chilly night counterpart both on its own or with Cape baked puds and a cheese board. 

And don't underrate their Cape Ruby, a non-vintage four-star budget-beater with a string of awards to its credit. Packed with fruit and spice, produced from a blend of different Portuguese cultivars and vintages, this is a port to savour in winter and pour over crushed ice in summer.

De Krans is one of the oldest cellars in the Gamka river valley, being established in 1890 by the current owners' great-grandfather.

 

 

 

 

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It's got the depth and discernible minerality. The freshness is balanced by full-bodied flavours - from rich grilled pineapple to mango, from a mix of citrus to a hint of cream, into which vanilla essence has been whipped. Every aspect is  beautifully balanced and in tune in this very subtly wooded chard, with 13,5% alcohol levels. It is, without doubt, the chardonnay I have most revelled in sipping this winter. Muratie Isabella  chardonnay 2015 costs R145 and is worth every cent. It makes a superb aperitif on chilly evenings, and goes on to partner sauced fish and seafood  and complex poultry dishes with charm, complementing but never overwhelming. 

When such a star comes your way, one is extra pleased that it emanates from a beautiful Stellenbosch farm, steeped in history, which has, as its custodians, a hospitable family who is very aware of the importance of its conservation for future generations.

For those who haven't treated themselves to experiencing the tangible ambience of a rural complex dating back 330 years, make Muratie your destination when planning your next wineland outing - it's both olde worlde and up -to -the -minute with mountain biking and trail running facilities, and, best of all, its open seven days a week.   

 

 

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The setting is simply superb. From both the terrace and through the wrap-around full-length glass walls of the restaurant, vineyards and pastures roll out below you, bisected by the R60. The Brandwag, Rabiesberg and long line of the Langeberg range frame this inviting hilltop venue, open for some eight months.

Well-situated between Worcester and Robertson , this is an ideal stopping-point; Nuy could not have thought of a better way of celebrating their 50th anniversary.

Paging through the nostalgic and beautifully illustrated Nuy gedenkboek, we read about the cellar’s maiden harvest in 1965, a total of 6 192 tons, made up of Muscadel, Othello, Pontac, Pinotage, Hanepoot, Witsag and Hermitage. While hermitage is today better-known as cinsaut, the latest old-timer to head to trend-topping status, I could not find info on Othello or Witsag.

It it did not take Nuy long to become renowned for the outstanding quality of its soetes – muscadels both red and white, which even today continued to attract awards annually, yet are stil sold at giveaway prices.

As the number of reds and whites continued to increase, Nuy has slotted wines into three ranges. The entry wines, Inspiration, consist of five whites – sauvignon blanc, chenin, chardonnay, colombar and their perennially popular Chant de Nuit a blend of chenin and colombar finished with a little Ferdinand de Lesseps, a table grape. From the reds, my table companion found the 2015 cabernet sauvignon very agreeable, and there is also a shiraz and pinotage which we did not sample. There’s an off-dry sparkling wine made from sauvignon blanc and a semi-sweet bubbly using muscat. The 2015 red and white muscadels complete the range. Prices range from R30 to 47 for the whites, the reds are all R55 and the muscadels R52. The sparkling wines cost R50.

The middle range, called Mastery offered a delightfull, carefully wooded chardonnay, which makes a perfect “winter white” (R85) and a trio of reds , all priced at R103– 2013 pinotage (exceptionally light in colour, characteristic nose, medium bodied, modern and enjoyable), and a cab and shiraz, both 2013.

Nuy’s top range Legacy, leads with their flagship red blend Argilla 2013,(R150) a blend of 62% shiraz, 31% pinotage, finished with cab. Elegance joined by a good backbone, smooth tannins, this will be worth keeping for a few years . We did not try the bubbly, (R150) nor the potstill brandy, but I can vouch for the hugely impressive 50 Vintages Red Muscadel (R165). Matured for three years in small oak, bottled to mark the 50th anniversary, this sophisticated fortified has already attracted double gold from Michelangelo, and 4 and half stars from Platter – worth five I think.

And so, to the food.

When I see a menu as large and varied as Nuy’s I usually find that the cuisine suffers, as few kitchens can cope with such a huge number of dishes . While two of us enjoyed a simple lunch there one Friday, I can report that not only was the restaurant buzzing with happy diners, but also I did not see anyone complain or send back anything but well-cleaned plates. I have not heard a single bad report on the fare at this restaurant from local diners in the Robertson valley – so perhaps this is an exception to the usual rule.

Breakfast offers predictable variations on the bacon and egg theme, plus a salmon rosti and a Nuy Benedict. There’s a a choice of seven burgers, including a Banting burger which replaces the bun with a giant mushroom. The tapas menu is extensive – my companion tried and enjoyed the beef carpaccio, which was a generous offering teamed with shaved parmesan and a balsamic glaze. From the speciality dishes, - pork, battered fish and chicken enchilada – I opted for mushroom soup, and it was a good choice – plentiful, creamy, and well-flavoured and served with toast. There is also an extensive pizza menu prices ranging from R85 to R105, while steaks – fillet and sirloin with a choice of toppings and sauces - start from R115.

By way of contrast the dessert menu is miniscule – cake, spring rolls, waffle with banana caramel, cream or icecream, and icecream with bar one sauce. We tried two of these, again a large serving, predictably rich and satisfying for every sweet tooth. Beverages include a range of milkshakes , and there’s a full liquor licence. Nuy on the hill cocktail (R45) melds peach schnapps, vodka, orange juice and blue curacao. There are four artisanal beers from the Mountain Brewing Co made on the Klipbokkop reserve which seemed a popular choice with diners. A kiddies menu concludes a really astonishing range .

Six years go the Nuy directors handed over 1ha of white and 1ha of red muscadel vines to the cellarworkers who formed the Keerom Landbou Bpk, to develop and cultivate themselves. From their maiden harvest in 2011 their grapes have been rated in outstanding condition. They are delivered to the Nuy cellar and form part of the distinctive 50 Vintages Red Muscadel.

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ALL SORTS OF SALADS by Chantal Lascaris. Published by Struik Lifestyle 2016.

 

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This compact softback is both a convenient size for kitchen use and a compilation that is likely to pay its way and more, a practical and useful collection that will be consulted often over the four seasons.

Its neither showy or madly original, and the author is someone who came to entertaining, food and cooking after moving from corporate business to become a pilates instructor and developing a new interest in both health and unearthing new ideas for salads, which feature high in her diet.

Lascaris tells us in her introduction that the recipes she has developed and tweaked coincide, quite accidentally, with today’s culinary trend. She says this, her first cookbook, took a while to materialize: its simplicity is part of its attraction and both health nuts and reluctant and nervous cooks will be among its keenest fans.

Use your freezer to keep crispy bacon bits and garlic croutons ready to add zip to salads, roast nuts and seeds when you have the time and keep them in a glass container. Freeze cooked rice, lemon juice and pesto as well as almonds for use in salads and dressings. (Pesto is best frozen without the parmesan cheese, by the way).

Old favourites in new guises sees up to date versions of coleslaw, potato, Caesar, Waldorf and three-bean salads, among others. The substantial vegetarian chapter includes basics like tomato and onion, lemon mushroom and the popular butternut and mozzarella salad recipes, and some trendy combinations like beertroot, quinoa and rocket, and cauliflower, butter bean and feta. I like her citrus salad for winter, which includes avo and cucumber, but I would omit the mangetout which is not a winter ingredient.

Fish and seafood star in some delectable summery combinations – think grilled tuna steaks and nectarine salsa , salmon and pistachio, even a fish cake salad which is also a main course , complete with sweet potato chips and usual mixed salad ingredients. Shrimp and avo are presented as a first course with green apple, calamari is teamed with chorizo and chickpea in an Iberian charmer. Chicken makes the base for a number of tempting meals, some of which take the form of open sandwiches, Asian and Occidental main courses.

The chapter on meaty salads presents main courses packed with protein plus healthy green and other ingredients for all-round one-dish fare. Ostrich, pancetta, egg and bacon, steak, bacon, beef carpaccio are all dressed up with ingredients to present a colourful and complete meal.

The collection concludes with fruit salads, some spiced, some spiked, with a final section of salad dressing recipes both conventional and innovative.

Good photographs add hugely to the attraction of this collection, which is also well-indexed.

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If Calling northern suburbs winelovers! Just ahead of spring, head to Capegate Shopping Centre for a great weekend wine fest, taking place from 5 - 9pm on Friday August 26 and from 12 noon to 6pm on Saturday 27th.

Festival visitors can taste and buy more than 100 wines directly from the wineries, which include large producers with well-known brands and smaller boutique and family-owned wineries, giving a taste of the best of South Africa’s winelands in one venue.

The Cape Wine Academy is presenting a wine theatre (Three sessions on Friday and four sessions on Saturday) with fun tastings and pairings on the programme at set times.

Participating wineries include: Alexanderfontein/Ormonde, Arendskloof/Eagle’s Cliff, Beyerskloof Wines, Biocape Wines, Bonnievale Cellar, Diemersfontein Wines, Dieu Donnè Vineyards, Deux Frères Wines, Du Toitskloof Wines, Edgebaston, Eerstehoop Wines, Fledge & Co, Groenland, Imbuko Wines, La Couronne Wine Estate, MWS, Orange River Cellars, Overhex Wines International, Perdeberg Winery, Peter Bayly Wines, Stellenbosch Hills, Villiera Wines, Villiersdorp Cellar, Yonder Hill Wines.

The Pebbles Project, which looks after disadvantaged children, especially those impacted by alcohol, is the charity beneficiary of the festival and will be present to spread their message and raise funds and awareness.

Tickets from the door or through www.quicket.co.za  cost R70 pp (Includes a branded tasting glass) Bookings for the CWA theatre sessions can be made at the ticket office.

For up to date information, visit

 

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Nedbank Cape Winemakers Guild Auction Showcase of rare, individual wines

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This popular annual event takes place in Cape Town on Thursday, 18 August at the CTICC from 6pm and in Johannesburg on Wed August 24 at the Atrium, Nedbank Sandton at 6pm. Tickets cost R250 which includes a tasting glass.

Wine enthusiasts cantaste these unique collectors’ wines crafted exclusively in small volumes for the 2016 Cape Winemakers Guild Auction by the Guild’s 47 members.Members of the Guild will also be presenting some of their acclaimed offerings sold under their own labels. Guests can also bid on rare signed bottles from previous Guild auctions during the Silent Auction. Founded in 1999, the Development Trust seeks to transform the wine industry by educating, training and empowering young talent through initiatives such as the Protégé Programme, a highly acclaimed mentorship scheme for upcoming winemakers and viticulturists.Tickets can be purchased via

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  Quest for the Best 2016

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The seventh annual Mutual & Federal Agri Wellington Wine Route “Quest for the Best” was celebrated with an awards luncheon in Wellington on Friday 29 July. During the judging process on 21 July a record number of 92 wines by 16 Wellington producers were tasted blind by six well-known judges.  The wines are judged and scored according to a tried and tested points system. 

 

The judges were: Bennie Howard ,Samarie Smith,Sandile Mkhwanazi, Johann Fourie,Danielle le Roux and Kris Snyman.

 Best top 10 wines from Wellington are:

 Bosman Family Vineyards – Bosman Cabernet Sauvignon 2008

  • Doolhof Wine Estate – Lady in White 2010
  • Wellington Wines – La Cave Pinotage 2015
  • Wellington Wines – La Cave Shiraz 2014
  • Mont du Toit - Les Coteaux Cabernet Franc 2012
  • Andreas Wine  – Andreas Shiraz 2013
  • Diemersfontein Wines – Diemersfontein Carpe Diem Viognier 2015
  • Diemersfontein Wines – Woolworths Reserve Collection Pinotage 2014
  • Douglas Green – Douglas Green Chenin Blanc 2016
  • Linton Park Wines - Linton Park Merlot 2015

 

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Perhaps it’s only when you have taken part in an organic certification audit that you begin to realise the lengths wine farmers and producers need to go to to obtain that international certification.

Earlier this month I was lucky enough to sit in on such an audit, and one that had particular significance for both the farmer – Patricia Werdmuller von Elgg – and one of the auditors! But let me set the scene…

If you wish to label your wines as organic, you need to have your farm and cellar certified by one of the international certification organizations. One of these is SGS, an enormous global group which certifies many manufactured as well as natural products. Because of the limited number of serious organic farmers in South Africa, SGS recently appointed a German company specialising in certifying organic agriculture to conduct the final audit and issue the certificates.

Hout Baai farm is a beautiful boutique wine farm just outside McGregor, in a high valley that looks onto the Sonderend mountains which surround it. From the owner’s terrace sweeping views over vines take the eye toward Die Galg – the saddle at the end of the “road to nowhere” - which is really a high meeting place for hikers and travellers who revel in the protea-rich fynbos which cloaks the terrain.

The picture-perfect farm has been certified as fully organic since 2005. This year Hout Baai was chosen by the certification team as an example of just how an organic farm should look and operate with a place for everything and everything in its place. The audit was particularly important as not only was the resident SGS auditor conducting the checking, but the LACON international auditor was present, overseeing the process, and both were under the eagle eye of DAkkS, the German accreditation body for that country’s Federal Republic.

The inspection date for this three-tier audit was set for mid-July, but the three arrived in Mcregor a day ahead of schedule. They settled into the office where the local representative of the certification body started her work with a long list of questions, which needed not only oral answers but proof by way of reams of paperwork. Pat Werdmuller possesses more files than I have ever seen on a farm, where delivery notes, invoices, statements, receipts and printouts provide years of proof of transactions with approved service and material providers. These were hauled out on demand, as they worked their way through how water is tested, how pipes are cleaned, what fertilizers are used. Records of purchase of guano, seaweed and donkey manure were checked then questions turned to frequency of their application and in what concentrate?

Moving to harvest time, when grape picking machines were hired, questions were asked about the possibility of their bringing in unwanted residue of non-organic matter. They are delivered the day before, replied farm manager Del Jones, “so our guys can scrub and wash them down, ready for harvesting which started at 3.30am."

If there is any doubt about dates, the diary is consulted – this set of annual volumes, dating back to when the farm started operations – is filled with daily entries of chores completed, indoors and out, accompanied by photographs as way of proof.

The second half of the audit took the form of a tour of the farm, as the visitors were shown firebreaks, and buffer trees along boundaries (to limit the chance of non-organic sprays drifting over from neighbouring farms). The approved korog, a wheat-like grass planted between the vine rows to provide a nutrient-rich mulch was starting to show green and pruning of the sauvignon blanc vines was under way , each row numbered (and named after an animal or bird that frequents the farm). Del showed the inspectors the sizeable hole dug by a friendly anteater which had these Germans looking a little bewildered. She also pointed out the camera traps which record the visits of caracals, jackals, hares and antelope, as this farm is as much of a nature reserve as it is a wine grape farm.

The compost plant and the worm farm were duly inspected, and then the stores and workshop revealed just how diligently tools are looked after and kept in their place. The farm labourers’ wendy house – cosily furnished with places for both wet and dry weather uniforms and footwear and sporting refreshment facilities – was duly admired and also noted were the required warning signs and notices detailing safety and health information both inside and outside buildings and machinery.

It came as no surprise to any of us that Hout baai farm passed inspection with flying colours and was thanked by SGS for their faultless presentation and co-operation.

Since that day I have been thinking about the number of organic wine and grape producers listed in the latest edition of the SA wine industry directory, which I received recently. In this useful compendium, published annually by WineLand media, a total of 38 organic growers and cellars are listed. According to one Western Cape producer, who shall be nameless at this stage, only three of these are certified organic. While I have not trawled through those 38 to see if they have included details of international certification in their Platter entries (if, indeed, they are all listed in Platter), it does bring up the vexed question of some producers labelling their wines as “organic” without having been certified.

“We’re all organic these days!” was a cheerful comment from one (non-organic) farmer and winemaker. Many would beg to differ.    

Those who are spending inordinate amounts of time and money to transform their farms and cellars to comply with the exacting demands of global organic auditors do so, of course, of their own free will. But it’s unsurprising they also grit their teeth in frustration at the lack of monitoring and control over those who are benefitting from the green and environmentally-conscious consumer through fraudulent labelling.

Even if farms grow grapes and produce wine organically, only those certified by an internationally accredited body – accompanied by a seal of this organisation – are entitled to label their wines as organic. However, some producers who follow organic principles in every respect choose not to be certified, because of the expensive, labour- intensive, regular, obstructive and lengthy inspections.                                                  

And to further muddy the waters, SA producers are allowed, I am told, to state on bottle labels that their wine was produced from organically grown grapes. And, what about the cellars who produce a range of organic wines alongside non-organic …

At which stage, it seems high time for a glass or two of enjoyable wine, made from organically grown and certified grapes in an organically certified cellar. Make mine a Solara sauvignon blanc. Cheers!

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Pinotage and Peace Parks – and Wine, Wheels and Wildlife

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Conservation benefits from sales of Eikendal estate’s recently launched 2015 pinotage, a South African red that offers as much pleasure to keen palates as it will help swell the  funds of the Peace Parks Foundation.

This follows on Eikendal’s sponsorship of other conservation organizations like Cheetah Outreach and the Bushveld Foundation.

Peace Parks has been doing sterling work in the fields of transfrontier conservation, development of human resources and support of sustainable economic development.

Pinotage, our only all-South African cultivar seems the right grape to be involved in helping fund biodiversity and regional peace projects across southern African borders. It’s also a very enjoyable wine, with moderate alcohol levels of 13% that presents a modern, subtle approach in its treatment of our national black grape, offering elegance and freshness from a 20-year-old dryland vineyard. Selling from the cellar door at R105, 5% of sales from this source will be channelled to the Foundation.

 

 

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Staying with wines and wildlife conservation, Painted Wolf owner/winemaker Jeremy Borg has led mountain biking weekends to raise funds for wild dogs and community projects in South Africa, Botswana and Zimbabwe. The next Pedal 4 Paws excursion will see up to 40 riders enjoy a Rare Carnivore ride in Somkhanda Game Reserve in northern KZN. Somkhanda is a community reserve , a wild and beautiful stretch of thick bush and rolling hills, belonging to the Gumbi community. It takes place from September 16 -18

Both conservation and community projects will be supported.The Endangered Wildlife Trust will benefit from a donation as well. For more info, see www.paintedwolfwines.com

 

 

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A varied lineup of events as winter gives way to a green and glorious spring!

 

Benguela on Main restaurant is offering a five-course Christmas dinner on Saturday July 30 . Chef Jean Delport is including treats like smoked breast of goose on his menu, which costs R540 a head. Pair your meal with Benguela Cove wines, and Somerset West residents can enjoy a complimentary drive service to and from the restaurant. For more information or to make a reservation to avoid disappointment, visit the website, call 087 357 0637 or email onmain@benguelacove.co.za

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 Steenberg’s Cool Runnings charity trail run takes place through the Constantia vineyards on Saturday August 6. Choose from a 5 or 10km loop. All proceeds to the Mdzananda Vet Clinic in Khayelitsha, a community project that provides quality care for ill and abandoned animals. Finish with a glass of Steenberg sparkling sauvignon blanc and follow with a free wine tasting if you wish. A Mdzananda Vet Donation Box will be available prior to the race where leashes, blankets, dog or cat food and other pet items can be dropped into.The entry fee is R130 per trail runner, R50 per teen between the ages of 12-17, while children under 12 have free entry. Registration opens at 7am outside the Bistro1682 Restaurant. Walkers are welcomed. The briefing takes place 15-minutes ahead of the race at 8am. Pre-booking is essential and can be done online at www.quicket.co.za.

 

Bottelary Hills Wine Route ‘Pop Up’ Lunch

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Savour a slow-cooked Sunday pork lunch with chef Bertus Basson on August 14 at Groenland estate when he will present a three-course lunch that smokes, sears and sizzles. The fires will be lit and guests can enjoy Bottelary Hills wine ahead of their meal. Lunch costs R350 a head, including a wine tasting and glass of wine per course. Book through www.wineroute.co.za or Tel: (021) 886 8275 or marketing@wineroute.co.za

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Nedbank Cape Winemakers Guild Auction Showcase of rare, individual wines

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This popular annual event takes place in Cape Town on Thursday, 18 August at the CTICC from 6pm and in Johannesburg on Wed August 24 at the Atrium, Nedbank Sandton at 6pm. Tickets cost R250 which includes a tasting glass.

Wine enthusiasts cantaste these unique collectors’ wines crafted exclusively in small volumes for the 2016 Cape Winemakers Guild Auction by the Guild’s 47 members.Members of the Guild will also be presenting some of their acclaimed offerings sold under their own labels. Guests can also bid on rare signed bottles from previous Guild auctions during the Silent Auction. Founded in 1999, the Development Trust seeks to transform the wine industry by educating, training and empowering young talent through initiatives such as the Protégé Programme, a highly acclaimed mentorship scheme for upcoming winemakers and viticulturists.Tickets can be purchased via www.webtickets.co.za

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“WE LOVE WINE” FEST RETURNS TO CAPEGATE 

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If Calling northern suburbs winelovers! Just ahead of spring, head to Capegate Shopping Centre for a great weekend wine fest, taking place from 5 - 9pm on Friday August 26 and from 12 noon to 6pm on Saturday 27th.

 

 

Festival visitors can taste and buy more than 100 wines directly from the wineries, which include large producers with well-known brands and smaller boutique and family-owned wineries, giving a taste of the best of South Africa’s winelands in one venue.

 

The Cape Wine Academy is presenting a wine theatre (Three sessions on Friday and four sessions on Saturday) with fun tastings and pairings on the programme at set times.

 

Participating wineries include: Alexanderfontein/Ormonde, Arendskloof/Eagle’s Cliff, Beyerskloof Wines, Biocape Wines, Bonnievale Cellar, Diemersfontein Wines, Dieu Donnè Vineyards, Deux Frères Wines, Du Toitskloof Wines, Edgebaston, Eerstehoop Wines, Fledge & Co, Groenland, Imbuko Wines, La Couronne Wine Estate, MWS, Orange River Cellars, Overhex Wines International, Perdeberg Winery, Peter Bayly Wines, Stellenbosch Hills, Villiera Wines, Villiersdorp Cellar, Yonder Hill Wines.

 

The Pebbles Project, which looks after disadvantaged children, especially those impacted by alcohol, is the charity beneficiary of the festival and will be present to spread their message and raise funds and awareness.

 

Tickets from the door or through www.quicket.co.za  cost R70 pp (Includes a branded tasting glass) Bookings for the CWA theatre sessions can be made at the ticket office.

 

For up to date information, visit www.capegatecentre.co.za

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Bot River hosts blooming nice Spring Weekend

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Enjoy a relaxed weekend in the Overberg from September 2 – 4 during the annual fest hosted by the winemaking community. The region features 11 wine farms, each of which will offer attractions ranging from farm fare, olive oils, fine wines and local talent. Attractions include sausage-making course at Luddite, oysters and bubbles from Genevieve MCC, fynbos hikes at Paardenkloof, lunch at Wildekrans and at Gabrielskloof. Plenty to amuse the small fry as well. Farms will be open from 10am to 4pm. Tickets (weekend pass) cost R100 and obtainable from www.quicket.co.za .For more information on the Bot River Spring Weekend 2016 contact Melissa Nelsen at Cell: 083 302 6562 or email Melissa@genevievemcc.co.za.

 

MIKI CIMAN OF LA MASSERIA INTRODUCES SMALLER CHEESE MAKERS

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Be it gorgonzola, pecorino, fontina, mozzarella, provolone, brie, chèvre, blue or cheddar, the Say Cheese! Artisan Cheese Fair will celebrate all things cheese on 24 and 25 September 2016 at the Italian Club, Milnerton. THE event will bring together artisan cheesemakers, cheese lovers, bakers, brewers and visitors. Says Ciman, “The Fair will allow guests to appreciate every step of the farm-to-table process of cheese making, while highlighting the extraordinary local talent we have in this field. Chefs will take part and wine will be on sale. Tickets will be on sale at the door, at R80 for adults and R30 for children from 11 – 18. Children under 10 go in free.For further information, please email Kiki at saycheesefair@gmail.com or phone Elize Nel on 072 795 4214.

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Health benefits and sensational flavours are two reasons to welcome the current gastronomic craze of fermentation. Myrna Robins gets the lowdown on updates of this ancient technique . This article first appeared in the Cape Argus on July 20 and in The Star the following day.

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Less adventurous palates will no doubt shy away from an offering of fermented black garlic with a “tender, almost jelly-like texture with a consistency similar to a soft dried fruit…” Yet the same diners probably relish their breakfast yoghurt followed by crisp toast, and enjoy fine wine or a good artisanal beer when eating out. All of which have undergone fermentation, which is best defined as a metabolic process that converts sugar to acids, gases or alcohol. It occurs in yeast and bacteria, and also in oxygen-starved muscle cells, as in the case of lactic acid fermentation.

We humans have been busy fermenting our food and drink since the Neolithic age, both for preservation and good health. China, India, Egypt, Babylon (Iraq), Mexico and Sudan are countries where evidence of fermented fare and beverages have been uncovered, the earliest around 7 000 years ago.

Early this year culinary websites were announcing fermentation as one of the hottest trends of the year. And, predictably, South African chefs are not being left behind as they experiment with a range of ingredients that are adding zing to our tastebuds . I contacted a few of the Western Cape’s leading chefs to get their say on the subject.

First stop Franschhoek where executive chef Oliver Cattermole presides over the kitchens of Leeu House, a boutique hotel in the village and the five-star mountainside Leeu estate. At the launch of the latter last month, his luncheon menu included black garlic and smoked miso as accompaniment to braised heirloom carrot, an intriguing mix of bland root vegetable with tingling flavours. Miso, a traditional Japanese seasoning is produced by fermenting soybeans with salt, a particular fungus and other ingredients such as rice or barley.

With an enviable relaxed approach that belies carefully created, utterly delicious five-star cuisine, Cattermole is embracing the new trend comprehensively, as these comments from him prove:

“Jac [his baker] ferments all of his yeast for his breads and sour doughs – we have one that he feeds daily that is nearly three years old. All the chocolate that we use is fermented. We are currently fermenting red onions, slowly turning them translucent, which we use in our butternut lunch dish. We have just started a ferment with walnuts, which should be ready by Christmas. And we are fermenting garlic, both wild and elephant ,which has been ongoing since October last year… about three weeks ago it started to turn black which is the desired effect, and it makes the kitchen smell lekker.”

Down the R45 to the Drakenstein valley and Boschendal estate where chef Christian Campbell has spent months researching and experimenting with fermenting produce traditionally popular in international cuisines. Along with the mammoth task of overseeing all the restaurant menus on this large estate, he sources his produce from the huge organic vegetable and herb garden, which enables him to present seasonal menus which change daily. Fermented lemons feature right now, while Campbell embraces the popular oriental traditions of kimchi, kombucha and kefir on his his signature shared meal platters in the Werf restaurant. He describes these classics for us:

“Kimchi is a national Korean dish consisting of fermented chilli peppers and vegetables, usually… Chinese cabbage, radish, garlic, red pepper, spring onion, ginger, salt and sugar… fermented with red pepper, garlic, ginger and salty fish sauce. …It is rich in vitamins, aids digestionsand may even prevent cancer…. The best tasting kimchi is stored at room temperature for an average of six months to reach its full flavour.

“Kefir is high in nutrients and probiotics and is incredibly beneficial for digestion and gut health… a fermented drink, traditionally made using cow’s or goat’s milk. It is made by adding kefir “grains”– cultures of yeast and lactic acid bacteria… to milk. These multiply and ferment the sugars in the milk, turning it into kefir. All the rage with health addicts, this is considered to be a healthier, more powerful version of yoghurt.”

Readers who shop at pharmacy chains and health shops will have seen bottles of kombucha on the shelves, a fermented drink made with tea, sugar, bacteria and yeast. Kombuch ais a colony of bacteria and yeast which is added to sugar and tea, and left to ferment. The result is rich in vinegar, B vitamins and other compounds.

Campbell also uses fermented black garlic, which he describes as “sweet meets savoury, a perfect mix of molasses-like richness and tangy garlic undertones” and has turned to honey mead, which he describes as “fermented honey and water mixed with herbs and spices.” As one of the original alcoholic drinks of Africa, this is a good choice indeed.

We continue our culinary journey from bountiful Boschendal to the equally aristocratic Delaire Graff estate, off Helshoogte pass. Here pampered guests can choose to go oriental when dining in the Indochine restaurant where chef Virgil Kahn is introducing fermented ingredients with their rich probiotic profile to several dishes on his exotic menu. He had this to say about the hot topic of fermentation:

“On the whole consumers are still nervous to experiment with fermented foods, however they add a wonderful flavour profile to a dish, a natural refreshing zing which I love to experience in a dish. From kimchi to our salt- fermented black garlic, fermented foods are transforming not only the balance of flavours on a plate, but our overall health.”

So there you have it. Back to Chef Campbell for the following list of benefits that probiotics and a good balance of healthy bacteria, found in ferments, afford us: Boost our immune system and lower cholesterol. Reduce allergic reactions to both food and environment. Help reduce intestinal inflammation, prevent constipation, and suppress growth of harmful micro-organisms. And finally they apparently help manufacture K and and B-group vitamins, along with digestive enzymes and essential fatty acids.

Wow! no wonder fermented ingredients and drinks have long been red-hot hot favourites in the East, both with chefs and home cooks. Now that the West has cottoned on, are South Africans making their own versions of kimchi at home, or are our Occidental palates staying with sauerkraut and pickled cucumbers?

Fermentation festivals are taking place, I hear, across the United States in Portland, Oregon, in Massachusetts and in California at Santa Barbara. Perhaps we can look forward to our first South African celebration soon? An event where both the health-conscious and trendoid diner will mingle, palates a-tingle…

 

 

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As the lime-green baby leaves emerge from the pruned vines the original heart of wine production at Buitenverwachting, the old cellar, is being renovated to take on a new and very appropriate role.

This gracious building was first restored in the early 1980’s by Gwen and Gawie Fagan, which was also when the modern wine cellar and restaurant were built on the farm.

But the cellar’s history goes back to the late 18th century, and its likely that wine has been made on the farm since 1769, date which is reflected in the name of its  exceptional Noble Late Harvest.

Recently the cellar has housed the picnic facility, where generations of locals and overseas visitors have booked to savour family lunches on the lawned court enclosing the venerable outbuildings.

Now MD Lars Maack is breathing new life into the cellar, taking it back to a vinous role: A large terrace will seat guests for al fresco wining and dining, and inside a wine bar will cater for those visiting in inclement weather. Part of the cellar will showcase older vintages and present the history of these wines on a story-board. And, to keep the decor trendy, a lounge area will be added where guests can relax in comfort with their choice of vintages and order from a selection of light snack fare.

A large illuminated map illustrating the vineyards anad detailing the various cultivars and soil types, will add further interest.

Those 18th century walls are set enclose a facility where aromas and tastes will be evocative of the days when berries were brought in for crushing, and new wine gurgled in old oak barrels.

                                        

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Beautiful, bountiful Buitenverwachting, an estate which is allowed to present itself, its buildings, fine wines and gourmet fare in its serene setting without being prodded and pushed by marketing and advertising teams. Everyone there – from courteous owner Lars Maack to those pruning the vines – is aware of just how special this historic, five-star estate is, and gets on with the job of maintaining its fine reputation in cellar, restaurant and coffee shop.  The current edition of the Platter guide sums up its philosophy as “unshowy quality remains the watchword” adding that innovation and experimentation are never excluded.

That well said statement came to mind as I sampled two Buitenverwachting wines that fall into the unusual cultivar class, both limited releases that  deserve to be better-known and tried by the armies of fans who stay with sauvignon blanc and Christine, while adding a couple of cases of the ever-popular Buiten Blanc as their house wine.

Talented winemaker Brad Paton produced the 2014 vintage of 3rd Time Lucky in slightly oxidative style. It’s an aromatic, silky viognier, offering as much  spice as fruit, well-structured with moderate alcohol levels. It is a white wine that works well in the winter months with and without food, but makes a fine companion to well-prepared Cape Malay fish and poultry and Kashmiri dishes.

Brad's MPV 2010 – an unusual blend of merlot and petit verdot is delightfully fresh, the PV adding facets of sophisticated crispness and backbone to the easy-drinking fruity merlot. As well as pairing with lamb, it cuts the richness of rare peppercorn-crusted tuna, roasted in olive oil and served with lemony hollandaise.

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SORTING THE BEEF FROM THE BULL by Richard Evershed and Nicola Temple. Published by Bloomsbury, 2016.

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The sub-title, ‘the science of food fraud forensics ‘ is an immediate indication of the serious nature of this paperback, stated on the cover, (under a drawing of a horse, complete with outlines of cuts of horsemeat!)

However, thanks to witty chapter headings and lots of play on words, the text is very readable. The reader is drawn into a fascinating, thought-provoking, and occasionally depressing series of culinary operations that range from cheating to really sinister practices.

Misrepresentation or false statements on packaging are acts of fraud that cheat consumers while legitimate producers are being cheated out of business. Examples include eggs labelled ‘free-range’, fresh produce labelled ‘organic ‘and salmon as ‘wild-caught’.  USA pomegranate juice labelled as 100% was found to contain little or no pomegranate, consisting rather of corn syrup and other fruit juices.

Food fraud becomes food crime when networks of perpetrators are involved. They consist of the fraud inventor, the one who devises how to cheat, those who deal with transporting the goods across borders and countries, those who develop ways of avoiding detection in laboratory testing and auditing, and finally those who threaten the vulnerable in the industry to turn a blind eye to the practices.

One chapter focuses on egg production – an ingredient essential to western breakfasts and in hundreds of recipes. Apparently it’s neither difficult nor expensive to produce hen’s “eggs” from a series of chemicals that include sodium alginate, gelatin, sodium benzoate, colouring (for the yolk) and melted paraffin wax and gypsum powder (to create the shell). Fake eggs appeared in China in the mid-1990s and were cooked and eaten, they were so authentic looking. The health consequences of this are unclear as most of the ingredients are already used in food products, albeit in smaller quantities.

The authors realised, after initial research, that food fraud is truly an enormous topic. They devote a chapter to how scientists tackle the subject of finding evidence , complex in a globalised industry where ready-to-eat meals are processed to the point that nothing resembles the living things that once grew. How to develop tests to confirm or authenticate that truth of what labels tell us becomes a real challenge. As they develop ways of detecting corn syrup disguised as honey, the fraudsters find a new type of syrup that will escape detection.

Vegetable oil endures a long history of adulteration and continues to present challenges – cheap oil frequently added to expensive oil, while swindles has caused hundreds of deaths in Spain and shaken the US economy.

Mislabelling of seafood is a major occurrence, one to which the UK government is giving attention. Then there is the emotive issue of horse and other meats being included in burgers, curries, kebabs and chicken breasts. Many so-called all- beef sausages are anything but beef, and ham and chicken contain much  water. And vegetarians are not immune as the authors uncover cases of meat adulterating spices and of blood products making their way into baked goods…

Corruption in dairy products ranges from an extreme – fake milk made of urea and shampoo in India – to replacing animal-based fats with vegetable-based products . Only the major health scandals make the headlines, such as the 300 000 Chinese children who fell ill (six of whom died) in the 2008 discovery of melamine in milk.

The wine industry is described as one where the greatest economic gains can be made by falsifying. This in a market rife with scandals, where the criminals are “often as wealthy as their victims and …have the refined palates… that enable them to carry off such scams”. And don’t think that spirits like vodka and whisky are left out, as they are quite easy to adulterate, say the authors.

The spice story is another tale liable to cause some nausea. Suffice it to say, we need to check the source of our peppercorns. We should buy whole spices rather than ground to ensure that they do not contain additives (which can, apparently) include dust, rodent hairs and insect fragments. Cayenne pepper has been found to contain ground rice, mustard seed, sawdust, brick dust and salt, and can be coloured with red lead oxide (which can lead to lead poisoning.) The turmeric story is equally depressing – and ironic – given that  many health nuts are hailing this as a wonder food.

Even fresh fruit and vegetables do not escape fraudulence – mangoes a sprayed with formalin (from Bangladesh)and other methods to keep items looking fresh well beyond their real age, are grey areas  that may not be illegal but certainly are deceitful. And could even be deadly.

Looking to the future, its likely that food fraud will increase: climate change will increase the prevalence of livestock diseases and affect crop yields, tempting more people toward dishonest practices. As Prof Chris Elliott of Belfast University remarks in the foreword – “A number of food-business operators …have told me their biggest dilemma is to decide if they should cheat in the same way as their competitors, or go out of business”

The authors discuss actions we, the consumers, can take:   Be informed readers, (you could be, thanks to this book), so we are better equipped to detect and avoid food fraud. Be careful of unrealistic prices or bargains. Buy from people you trust. Other measures, like eating seasonally, can help. In some northern countries, governments are taking inspections seriously, with Denmark forming a Food Flying Squad whose inspectors arrive by helicopter unannounced, and inspect with a no closed doors policy (if keys are “lost” they call a locksmith immediately). Media have an important role to play as well, exposing fraud in industry and pressurising governments to act.

The British authors have, naturally, focussed on food and beverages in the United Kingdom. Local investigation? It's definitely needed. I don’t have the stomach (sorry!) for it, but perhaps some energetic food bloggers could mount a joint project.

Myrna Robins

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