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WITHINGTON DUO - Winning wines from Darling

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Charles-WITHINGTON-with--Gypsy-and-Darling-Vineyards-.JPG 

Charles Withington - seen here with Gypsy -  is renowned both as a successful négociant and a charming connoisseur in the Cape wine world . He is based in Darling where he presides over his inviting wine boutique The Darling Wine Shop, and he is passionate about the district of Darling as a source of good grapes and fine wine that reflects the terroir.

“A Darling Wine” reads the back label below the name Roan Ranger. This 2015 blend encompasses all that I could ask for in a red – Cinsaut-led, intriguing name,b2ap3_thumbnail_WITHINGTON-Roan-Ranger-Cinsaut-Grenache-Mourvedre-2013-HR.jpg

appealing front label, and a delightful story behind the product. Happily, the wine itself lives up to every expectation, an unshowy blend of immense charm, smooth, beautifully integrated, the Cinsaut dominating while benefitting from vigorous, companionable Grenache and powerful, meaty Mourvèdre.

Charles Withington fulfilled a long-held ambition with the creation and release of this wine, one which saw his quest for the production of  a Rhone-style blend that would combine the harvest of Darling grapes that best reflect the vintage year, while introducing a sense of the communication between man and horse. His firm belief in Cinsaut goes back many years to when he worked at Rustenberg. The Withington association with, and love of, horses is a long-established one, here celebrated by naming the wine after a roan, or horse whose coat consists of more than one colour (an equine blend, suggests Withington.)

Made with immense care which shows in every sip, each of the three components were harvested and vinified separately. Malolactic fermentation took place in lightly oaked French fourth and fifth- fill barrels and the final blend selection made after one month.

Withington’s Nguni Malbec 2015is another wine that presents both a lesser-known cultivar and honours an indigenous beast and celebrates both along with Charles’ love of the Darling wine district. Most of us first encountered Malbec through the Argentinian product, and now  various New World countries are planting the grape and UK sales reveal it to be the fastest growing varietal in sales terms, Darling can boast nine hectares of Malbec, which, Withington points out is four times the national average. Grapes for the Nguni Malbec 2015 were sourced from a dryland single vineyard on Oranjefontein farm.

Charles likens the grape to the patient, tolerant Nguni cattle, which have been produced for beef in the Darling area for decades. Juicy and fruity, more than meaty, this is moreish Malbec, medium-bodied, and enjoyable solo as well as complementing good red meat (Nguni beef?)

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At R90 a bargain buy, and one that could hardly be bettered as an introduction to this dark and ancient French varietal.

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