food-wine-blog

Myrna Robins

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Login
    Login Login form

Posted by on in Food

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_LaMotte-Pierneef-Sauv-Blanc-2018-01-2.jpg

It’s a good start when your just-launched 2018 sauvignon blanc attracts gold and the Best of Show South Africa White award at the reputable Mundus Vini spring tasting held in Neustadt, Germany last month.

Not that this new release from the prestigious Pierneef Collection differs that much from its previous vintages: for both the 2016 and 2017 share many characteristics with the current release, a feature that many legions of fans applaud and expect.

In the 2018 Pierneef sauvignon blanc the semillon component is upped to 12% from 8% last year, a move which I think mellows flinty sauvignon blancs with a touch of honeyed, waxy richness. It is also an all-Cape South Coast wine, its grapes having been sourced in Elim and Napier, with the semillon from Elim.

Staying true to previous vintages the nose offers hints of grapefruit and gooseberry, follows with these flavours on the palate, plus some green pepper, allied to crisp freshness and backed by mineral notes. In all this elegant complexity already offers much pleasure, and will surely go on developing in bottle for years to come as cellarmaster Edmund Terblanche has  proven with previous vintages.

Alcohol levels are held to under 13% in this screwcapped bottle, adorned, as are its siblings,with a linocut of a South African scene from the Pierneef Collection.

Open a bottle of the 2016 vintage, which I did immediately after writing this, and the similarities were striking: the wine is as fresh and frisky as the latest vintage, with the semillon here sourced from Bot River. There is a waft of granadilla on the palate not noticeable in the other vintages.

In the 2017 vintage the semillon is reduced to just 8% and i think the difference is just discernible cf 2018, while the sauvignon grapes came from the same districts but the semillon originated in Elim.

Elegance is uppermost, and the Pierneef sauvignon blancs are stylish wines that present a complex blend of freshness, flavour and flint.

They make a fine aperitif ahead of a patrician menu, come into their own with most seafood creations such as La Motte Chef Eric Bulpitt’s Citrus and Fennel Franschhoek Trout and can enhance some dishes from the Far East – here advance experimentation is advisable...

The 2018 La Motte Pierneef Sauvignon Blanc sells for R135 online or at cellar door. For more information on the older pair visit www.la-motte.com/collections/pierneef-collection/products.

b2ap3_thumbnail_LaMotte-Citrus--Fennel-Cured-Franschhoek-Trout-3.jpg

Last modified on
0
Posted by on in News

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Klisenaar-with-grapes-2.jpg

What a pleasure to discover a “new” chenin, and one that is quite delicious and a tad different. It’s crafted from grapes thriving in an unlikely area by a talented (and modest) cellarmaster in the heart of the Klein Karoo.

Perhaps it’s not surprising that I only got to hear about Kluisenaar 2017 by Le Sueur Wines via a roundabout route, as a recluse - as Louis van der Riet has named his creation - does not look for publicity…

But when you get a product as enjoyable as this, with a nice vineyard story to boot, the news is bound to get out…

Louis van der Riet, (le Sueur is his middle name) has been making port and other good wines for De Krans for many years. He has also long held an ambition to make his own wines – a dream that was realised in 2014 when he released his maiden vintage.

Focussing on the Swartberg where the vines deliver harvests that are used mostly for bulk blends, Louis spent much time hunting down lone vineyards of chenin blanc that are hidden among the masses. Having found a few, reclusive, promising  and unloved, he became involved with their wellbeing.  Eventually he was able to transport their harvest to De Krans where he crushed the grapes and cooled the juice before pumping to barrels: one third new French oak, the remainder older wood where it fermented naturally and undisturbed for 10 months. No added yeasts, no fining nor filtering before bottling, so Louis claims, with good reason, that this is a chenin “made from nature, by nature”

Low alcohol levels of 12,5 % feature in this limited edition of 1 550 bottles, the wine offers stone fruit and melon flavours, a hint of toffee and vanilla discernible on the palate. Dry ,with enjoyable fresh acidity, all nicely balanced in a chenin of charm and intrigue. Available from the De Krans cellar in Callitzdorp for R175. Looking at his website, I see there’s a highly rated pinotage/cinsaut blend in stock and a merlot on the way. Book at De Krans for tastings and sales.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Kluisenaar-2017-pack.jpg

Last modified on
0

Posted by on in Recipes

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Delheim-Shiraz-Cab--Gnocchi-LR-4-2.jpg

 

 

This recipe arrived  from Delheim wine estate where they enjoy wild mushroom harvests in the winter, and dry some of porcini funghi for later use. If you cannot access this ingredient, double the quantity of the fresh mushrooms. Also a good idea is to practise making gnocchi on the family first before attempting it for guests - not difficult but fiddly.

Gnocchi:

2 cups cooked mashed potato

1 cup flour

1 egg yolk

salt and pepper

1T olive oil

1T butter

Sauce:

80g dried porcini msurhooms

250g mixed mushrooms

1 onion, finely chopped

3 cloves garlic , minced

1 cup cream

1 cup mushroom or vegetable stock

half cup grated parmesan cheese

ground black pepper

fresh basil leaves

Make the sauce: Pour very hot stock or water over dried mushrooms and soak about 15 mins. Drain, reserve stock or water.

Heat the oil add the onion, mushrooms and drained porcini mushrooms. Cook gently until mushrooms are tender but not brown, about 5 mins. Add the garlic and cook about 2 mins. Add the cream and reserved stock or water and increase heat until mixture simmers, simmer until sauce has thickened. Season to taste. Finish with cheese when serving. 

Make the gnocchi: Mix the mash, egg yolk, flour and a little salt to form a dough that is soft and a little sticky. Generously flour a working surface and your hands, place dough on surface and form a long sausage, about 3cm thick. Cut into 2cm pieces and press each lightly with back of a fork. Bring a pot of water to the boil and place gnocchi piece gently into water, and boil until they float to the top. Can leave for another few seconds and then take out using slotted spoon. Heat the oil and butter together and gently fry the gnocchi in batches untl golden..

Serve with the mushroom sauce, top with parmesan and shredded basil leaves .

A light-bodied red wine like Delheim Shiraz Cabernet Sauvignon makes a good partner.

Serves 2 hungry diners or 4 moderate appetites.

 

 

 

Last modified on
0

Posted by on in News

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Delheim-Shiraz-Cabernet-Sauvignon-2017--2.jpg

Not at all surprised to read that this unpretentious red blend is Delheim’s top-selling wine. What’s not to like about a captivating ruby-hued wine, medium-bodied, aromatic and fruity, that slips down as an enjoyable aperitif? It also goes on to happily accompany a range of home-cooked favourites, from mac’n cheese to chicken pie, from vegetarian pizzas to bangers and mash. It’s a wine that takes to weekend braais with equal enthusiasm, partnering chicken sosaties, boerewors and ribbetjies and yes, will be as happy paired with burgers, with pasta, with toasted cheese and tomato...

You get the picture. But what lifts this accessible value-for-money above many competitors is that it’s been made with care, offering consumers a delicious meld of shiraz aromas, fruit and spices that are well balanced by typical characteristics of cab. It sells for R85, is vegan-friendly with moderate 13,5% alcohol levels and offers a fine choice for everyday autumn sipping as our menus start to reflect seasonal changes.

Delheim marketers suggest that it will also enhance mushroom dishes, reminding us that their famous funghi foraging days are scheduled for mid-June. Seeing that the farm doesn’t produce a pinot noir, the Delheim Shiraz Cabernet Sauvignon 2017 will no doubt take on this role as well.

Delheim shared a couple of mushroom recipes with us, one of which I have featured in the food section of this website.

Cheers and bon appétit.

Last modified on
0

Posted by on in Cookbooks

b2ap3_thumbnail_CKBK-Vegan-cookbk-Scan0056.jpg

THE SOUTH AFRICAN VEGAN COOKBOOK

By Leozette Roode, published by Human & Rousseau,  Cape Town, 2018

The first of its kind in South Africa, this compilation of vegan recipes also offers readers who may be contemplating a vegan lifestyle much information, from basic equipments, answers to common questions, vegan alternatives for everyday products and menu ingredients using locally sourced products.

Last year veganism and its advocates became more frequent on South African culinary websites along with articles on the subject in the print media. This year sees more of the same, so that – while this country is, and is likely to remain, populated by avid meat-eating urban and rural South Africans, the number of vegetarians and vegans is sure to be increasing. Probably among the younger generation, who – if they stay the pace – will mean a larger number of older folk will bring up their families without eating meat in the near future. Time will tell.

Meanwhile this is the first local vegan cookbook to appear on our book store shelves, and author Leozette is well-equipped to write it: She is an international blogger, recipe developer and demonstrator of vegan recipes and ideas and has aimed, in this book, to offer readers 100 easy-to-follow, inexpensive and quick recipes.

Her journey from meat-eating to veganism is well- described in her introduction. Here she also offers facts on why going vegan is good for the environment, citing water resources needed to raise red meat and poultry, the quantity of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere while raising animals and the huge areas of our land that are required either for grazing these animals or growing crops to feed them. She also offers a useful list of vegan-friendly alternatives to meat, dairy, confectionery and other products – including wines.

Recipes start with breakfast ideas, including some berried smoothies and chocolate granola, follow with snacks like tandoori cauliflower bites and move to lunch choices that range from simple soups like zucchini “noodle” soup and multigrain salads to chicken-style salad cups and chilli con carne using soya mince. Some of the pasta dishes will tempt non-vegan eaters as well.

In the bakes offered as teatime treats the alternative ingredients are more obvious – eggs replaced with flaxseed powder, milk by almond or soya milk, butter by coconut oil, etc. But the results – muffins, scones, cakes and sweet tarts – look very appetising in the full page colour photographs.

Recipes for supper and grander occasions complete the menu and the recipe index ends the text.

Last modified on
0

Posted by on in Wine

b2ap3_thumbnail_Survivor-Chenin-Blanc-HR.jpg

 

Two enjoyable chenins came my way recently, nicely adding to the rich diversity of styles winemakers employ when transforming these versatile grapes into bottled sunshine.

From the Overhex cellars near Worcester, another label in their Survivor range, their 2018 barrel-fermented chenin blanc that is a great match for the seasonal specialties of autumn – think onion tart, butternut and Camembert soup, Mediterranean chicken bakes...

The winemakers sourced their grapes from a Swartland farm called Constantia, low-yielding blocks, that delivered full-flavoured berries. While 30% of the wine was fermented in stainless steel tanks , the rest underwent barrel fermentation in first- fill 500 litre untoasted French oak where the wine spent four months before being blended and bottled.

The results are impressive: there is plenty of structure in this chenin, a good balance between wood and fruit, with stone fruit predominant, The wine is fresh but not frisky, and clearly characteristic of the Swartland with its superior ability to deliver quality, fruitiness and backbone in one delicious integrated package. Alcohol levels of 13% are in keeping. The new cellar door price, post-budget, is R120.

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Groot-Phesantekraal-1_20190304-111114_1.JPG

 

From the north-eastern section of the Durbanville region, the vast Groot Phesantekraal farm has been releasing labels from its range  made by Etienne Louw, including this appetising summery 2018 chenin blanc, its grapes sourced from bush vines more than 50 years old. The result is fresh, fragrant and fruity, an unwooded aperitif or cheery companion to seafood and poultry salads. Unlike Durbanville sauvignon blanc which nearly always presents distinctive regional characteristics, this chenin did not identify itself – or not to me at any rate. But at R55 its a great buy and one that visitors to this sprawling farm should be sure to taste. It sports a double gold from the Michelangelo 2018 competition. (The price may have increased since the budget ).

Last modified on
0

Posted by on in News

b2ap3_thumbnail_Groote-Post-Seasalter-Sauvignon-Blanc-2018-hi-res-2.jpg

 

The name intrigues – Seasalter is, according to Nick Pentz, a mediaeval village in Kent that was engaged in salt production during the Iron Age – and transported to the Darling Hills as a moniker  for a superior sauvignon blanc. As one would expect, this is a wine that reflects Groote Post’s proximity to the Atlantic coast, with hints of kelp and saline touches between the friskiness, flint and some citrus and green fruit.

Seasalter 2018 also offers complexity, partly provided by its component of 10% Semillon and partly because half the wine matured in French oak for eight months before being blended into the rest which fermented in stainless steel tanks.

The characteristic Darling dustiness is just apparent, and the whole is a zesty, layered, distinctive sauvignon well reflecting its west coast terroir. Moderate alcohol levels of 13,5% are in keeping. Its simple white label adds an image of those white sands, the two seagulls seem to be having quite a battle with the south-easter, and turquoise touches reflect the Atlantic at its soothing best.

Earlier vintages were limited to members of the farm’s wine club, but the 2018 vintage is accessible to all, and this flagship sauvignon blanc sells for around R140.

Last modified on
0

Posted by on in Events

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Brians-Beef-brisket-3.jpg

Those following a Banting-type diet can savour a long, guilt-free feast with autumnal flavours at the next Pop-up in Pringle Bay lunch. March 9 is the day to diarise when Brian Berkman will set his long table for a five course buffet meal that includes ratatouille, beef brisket and cheesecake, home cooking at its tastiest best. The luncheon costs R350 and a digestif in the form of a walk on the beach is free of charge....

There are just 10 places available so booking in advance at Quicket or at BrianBerkman.com is essential. 

 

Bookings via Quicket are also open for the following dates: April 27, May 11, June 8, July 20, August 17, September 7, October 19, November 23, December 14, December 21 and January 4 2020 

Last modified on
0

Posted by on in Events

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_paarl-harvest-celebration-2019.jpg

There’s no need to drive between the nine farms taking part in the 2019 Paarl Harvest Celebration – a hop on, hop off shuttle will transport visitors from one to the next , leaving every 15 minutes.

The event takes place on Saturday March 02, starting at 8am. Taking part are Boland Cellar, Domaine Brahms, Mellasat Vineyards, Nederburg, Perdeberg Winery, Rhebokskloof Wine Estate, Simonsvlei, Vendome and Windmeul Cellar.

Try grape stomping, enjoy barrel tastings, go on a cellar tour and relish delicious food and wine while the kids take in special entertainment.

Each farm has its own programme which is listed on www.paarlharvestcelebration.co.za. Stock up on some wonderful value-for-money wines as well. Buy your ticket online at

https://www.quicket.co.za/events/65050-harvest-celebration-hop-on-hop-off-shuttle/#/ for R100. For more information contact +27 (0) 87 094 3850 or +27 (0) 78 706 9560.

Last modified on
0

Posted by on in News

 

  b2ap3_thumbnail_Revenant-Red-2017-low-res-pack-shot.jpg

Winemaker Nadia Barnard-Langenegger has joined other talented young Cape winemakers in their quest to re-introduce cabernets that are lent berried elegance from cinsaut, a practice that produced many of the long-lived cabs of the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s of the last century.

This makes the Revenant title of this False Bay Vineyards red particularly relevant, just as it applied to the maiden wine in this range, the blend of sauvignon blanc and chenin blanc, which made a stellar debut.

Revenant Red 2017 is the second, combining 80% cabernet from vineyards varying in age from 10 to 15 years with grapes from cinsaut bush vines up to 40 years old.

The cab harvest was slow fermented with natural vineyard yeasts, was foot-stomped twice daily after a three-day whole-bunch carbonic fermentation. The cabernet and cinsaut were aged separately for nine months in older oak before being blended and then matured in 600 litre barrels for a year before bottling.

The nose presents vibrant red fruit aromas, while the palate is well-balanced, with quite firm tannins and is medium-bodied with moderate 13,5% alcohol levels. As with its predecessor, the wine also reflects something of a light, feminine touch that distinguishes it from most other cabs, a feature that winemaker Nadia integrates into her creations with charming results. At R100 it is also competitively priced in a market where Stellenbosch cabs often command stellar prices. It's certain that many will welcome this rebirth of a classic cab.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Waterkloof-Winemaker-Nadia-Barnard-with-estate-owner-Paul-Boutinot-LR_20190221-094034_1.jpg

Waterkloof owner Paul Boutinot has established his biodynamic vineyards and cellar on the hillside above False Bay. False Bay Vineyards, his second range, is not biodynamic, but its wines are treated in similar environmentally-friendly ways, using natural yeasts, minimal processing, and sans fining before bottling. 

Last modified on
0

Posted by on in News

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Springfield-Albarino-l-LR-2.jpg

 

Going, going gone! It could be something of a record: The Bruwer family launched their maiden Albariño in Hout Bay on the first Monday in February and by mid-month the last of the 600 cases had sold, both from cellar door and the online shop.

Frustrating both to those Springfield wine fans who didn’t move fast enough and to newcomers who thought they would sample the new addition on their next visit to Robertson.

Better news is that the 2019 vintage is likely to be a little larger in quantity – the grapes were harvested yesterday, February 13, so let me tell you more about this irresistible white wine that the Bruwer family enjoy as much as do those lucky customers who  hugging their case closely to their chests...

Albariño is a new cultivar – new that is to the Cape winelands - but a Spanish varietal widely grown in Galicia, in the north-west. It made its 

 way to Portugal where it's known as Alvarinho, used in vinho verde, familiar to legions of South African travellers to Mozambique, and also to South America where Uruguay produces a fine example, and one that enchanted the Bruwer family while on holiday there. They returned, determined to acquire some vines for their farm.

Luck was on their side as the Newton Johnson family of the Hemel-en-Aarde valley had had similar ideas and kindly offered Springfield some of their cuttings.

These were carefully planted and nurtured, slowly multiplying over three years until a single block was established, and one that meets the demanding standards that Springfield estate sets for their grapes.

Earlier this month Abri, Jeanette and Jenna Bruwer gathered at Hout Bay to host curious media to the official launch of their limited edition Springfield Albariño 2018, its retro front label eye-catching, brick-red writing on a cream background, the language of choice pertinently Spanish, with just a strap at the bottom in English, identifying this unique Robertson estate.

This is a full-bodied wine, yet pleasing in having alcohol levels of just 12,5% . It is unwooded, the grapes having been harvested exactly a year ago. The wine spent more than 3 months on primary lees before bottling. There is complexity in its structure, offering the palate a delightful balance of stone fruit and the flint that wines from this terroir usually display. It’s also as fresh as a daisy without being over-acidic: All in all this South African Albariño yields mouthfuls of deliciousness that are a little redolent of the ocean: one does not need a dish of prawns on the table to know that it will partner shellfish with panache. But it also makes a charming aperitif and I imagine that the Uruguayan Albariño would have a tough time competing with its Cape counterpart.

Just 6 000 bottles of numbered bottles were produced, selling at R115 a bottle  from the cellar door. Perhaps Springfield will start a waiting list after harvest for the 2019 vintage - happily they have assured us that their journey with Albariño has only just begun.

Last modified on
0

Posted by on in News

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_ASARA-BELL-TOWER-2013.jpg

Popular and prolific wine and food writer and broadcaster Michael Olivier has just launched the first of a new series of podcasts, featuring noteworthy wines he regards as worthy of special attention. Called Michael's Minute of Wine, each podcast will be pithy and informative, both characteristics his legions of followers have come to expect.

 

The series kicked off this week with Asara’s The Bell Tower 2013, a fine Bordeaux style blend from the historic Stellenbosch estate in the Polkadraai Hills. The podcast  offers listeners an informative and tempting portrait of this  flagship , voiced in clear and simple terms that do not require specialist knowledge to absorb.

If you missed it you will find it at http://bit.ly/2DZx9XZ. Visit Michael’s website at www.michaelolivier.co.za for this and many more wine stories, suggested pairings with recipes from local foodie and up-to-date events across the South African winelands. He also reviews new cookbooks and new non-fiction that he has enjoyed.

 

Last modified on
0

Posted by on in Events

 

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_RWT-Handson-harvest-Country-Cuisines-2.jpg 

Country cuisine and al fresco feasts

    

This hugely popular late summer harvest celebration takes place over three days from Friday March 1 to Sunday the 3rd with towns and farms in the Robertson, Ashton, McGregor and Bonnievale areas taking part. As before, all ages and tastes are catered for in this food and wine affair, along with activities ranging from energetic to pampering the senses.

Experience the grape’s journey from vine to barrel to glass by picking & stomping, vineyard safaris and blending & tasting experiences. Enjoy riverside lunches, gourmet dinners, vineyard picnics and food & wine pairings. Vineyard runs and mountain biking both make great starts to the day or try a game of croquet.

Among the attractions are a terroir tour at Bushmanspad, or working for your breakfast at Jan Harmsgat by harvesting a basket of grapes before enjoying your al fresco meal under the pecan nut rrees. Lords Wines are hosting a special McGregor market at their superb mountainside location on the Saturday and Tanagra hosts will be offering wine and grappa tastings between distilling their worldclass marc on their picture-perfect farm outside McGregor. Along with conventional wine-tasting and pairings, Weltevrede estate is presenting cheese and wine and chocolate and wine pairings with their Simplicity range.

Entry to the big family market at Viljoensdrift on Sunday March 03 is free of charge. See www.handsonharvest for the full programme. Book directly with the farm offering the event of your choice. For accommodation, contact the local tourism offices in Robertson, Bonnievale, Ashton and McGregor. Call Robertsonwinevalley for more info on 023 626 3167.

 

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_RWT-Hands-on-hrvest-Kuipe.jpg.

Underground tastings in old candelit cellars

Last modified on
0

Posted by on in Events

Things are hotting up in every sense of the word. With harvest in full swing in many regions, the weather in some areas is sizzling, in others just offering enjoyable late summer warmth. Wine-lovers, travellers and adventurous spirits have a wealth of harvest fests and, of course, Valentine events to contemplate as February gives way to March.

G&T’s and more at Woodstock’s Old Biscuit Mill

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_gin-fest-.jpg

 

Sunday February 24 see the fourth Gin & Tonic Fest take place at this vibey venue, where popular and new gin brands are showcased to fans. The gin makers will be there to tell their stories, the Neighbourgoods Market will operate alongside, local performers will adda musical background and tempting artisanal food will be displayed.

Early Bird tickets have sold out and General Admission Tickets are live and going fast. There are three different group ticket options. Buy your whole crews' tickets to attend in one go and get a discount on each ticket purchased… the larger your group, the more you save. Please note that tickets for the day are limited, so we advise purchasing your tickets as soon as possible. 

Join The Gin Revolution… Get tickets here: http://qkt.io/G4C0gD Website:http://ginandtonicfestival.co.za/

 

 

DURBANVILLE HILLS INVITES YOU TO A WEDNESDAY AFFAIR

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Durbanville-Hills-cellar2.jpg

 

Every Wednesday at 18h00, from the, 20th of February until the 27th of March wine lovers are invited to enjoy an exceptional harvest experience at just R275 per person.

A glass of Durbanville Hills’ renowned Sparkling Sauvignon Blanc starts proceedings, followed by a cellar tour with one of the expert wine ambassadors. Then a delicious two-course dinner in the restaurant is matched to the cellar’s fine wines. 

As space is limited, prepaid bookings are required. For bookings or enquiries, please contact Stephanie Timm (0) 21 558 1300 or send an email to SLTimm@distell.co.za

 

 

MURATIE'S ANNUAL HARVEST FESTIVAL

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_muratie-Vistors-having-fun-stomping-grapes.jpg

 

 tthere are several options for visitors to this popular celebrations, taking place on Saturday March 02. Good food, fine wine, great company are all on the menu at this celebration hosted by the Melck family at their beautiful and historic farm.

Grape stomping and tractor rides through the vineyards is one activitiy while tastings and a long alfresco lunch with the cellar’s wine is another. Music will be provided by the Kitchen Jammin Blues band. Entrance tickets cost from R120 pp depending on what is booked.

For further information and bookings contact Nina Martin at Muratie on 021 865 2330/2336 orinfo@muratie.co.za.

 

PERDEBERG CELEBRATE THE PAARL HARVEST FESTIVAL

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Perdeberg_Venue-343_20190208-142724_1.jpg

 

Perdeberg Wine Cellar will celebrate their annual Harvest Festival on 02 March, 2019 from 10am. The cellar is off the R44, on the Voor-Paardeberg road in the Windmeul district. Entrance costs R60 a head, which includes wine glass and 10 tasting tickets while youngsters younger than 18 go in free of charge. Buy at the gate or online at

https://itickets.co.za/events/416910.html

Tastings of wine, craft beer and a bubbly bar will be offered, while food trucks, cheese platters, a biltong stall and an oyster bar should keep guests well fed. Live entertainment adds to the vibe, and there is a children’s area with recreational activities charged at R20 per child.

 

FAMILY FUN AT NEDERBURG DURING PAARL HARVEST FESTIVAL

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Nederburg-manor-house-at-sunset-LR.jpg

 

The Paarl Harvest Celebration takes place on Saturday, 2 March 2019. 

Nederburg’s programme starts with an hour-long yoga session presented by The Om Revolution, from 9:00 -10:00, on the lawn in front of the manor house. Follow this with brunch from their picnic basket costing R225 per head.

From 10:00 until 18:00, visitors can sample some of Nederburg’s young wines join the adult lawn games and stomp newly harvested grapes. A variety of fun activities will be lined up for children.

Live music by popular South African artists will keep visitors entertained and various food, ice cream and drink stalls will offer  country-style fare to enjoy with Nederburg wines. 

Free guided tours of Nederburg’s state-of-the-art cellar and Old Cellar Museum will take place every hour from 11:00 until 17:00

The Red Table restaurant in the manor house, will be serving its à la carte menu between 11:00 and 16:00. Restaurant reservations are advised, and picnics need to be booked and paid for in advance.

Book through www.webtickets.co.za at R50 per adult (free for those under the age of 18 accompanied by an adult). 

 

 

MONTH LONG VALENTINES AT ANTHONIJ RUPERT WYNE

 

Sweet treats and Rosés are being paired during February at this Franschhoek estate, with free tastings of rosé wines, both still and sparkling. Partner them with a gourmet salad if liked, and finish dinner with a rose bubbly and strawberry tart.

Buy a case of rose wines and get the 6th bottle free.

Book for a MCC and Sweet Treat tasting with three bubblies paired with four treats, including  citrus and dulce fudge, a raspberry blondie and a cherry and white chocolate truffe. This costs R95 a head and is available Mon – Saturday, booking  essential. To book email tasting@rupertwines.com or call 021 874 9041.

 

Last modified on
0

Posted by on in Blog

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Perdeberg_Venue-343.jpg

 

Huge, hospitable and a hive of activity. That sums up the scene at the Perdeberg cellar now and over the next few weeks with harvest in full swing. At least seven ranges of pocket-friendly wines of consistent quality flow from this impressive set-up, but the winery is first of all known for putting chenin blanc on the map before the trend became universal.   It also makes fullest use of the fact that among its 37 member-growers there are many who supply the cellar with the fruit-intense grapes from thousands of hectares of bush vines, many of them venerable and influenced by varying micro-climates

Recently I sampled wines from four of the ranges , adding up to a delicious and diverse case of enjoyment.

I started with the 2018 chenin blanc from the Perdebeg Classic range: Just as expected, mouthfuls of fresh and fruity flavour, notably peach and melon, delivering the characterful Swartland flavours that no other region can duplicate.  A crisp wine that will happily take on the roles of both sundowner and partner summer brunch and autumn picnics. It’s a wine that complements a wide range of vegetarian and poultry-based savoury fare with imperceptible ease. R43 from cellar door.

b2ap3_thumbnail_PERDEBERG--Rossouws-Heritage-nv.jpg

 

 

Rossouw’s Heritage takes chenin blanc up a notch or three, leading a patrician blend, with grenache blanc and viognier bringing up the rear in the 2017 vintage. I opened the 2015 wine, which is made up of 40% chenin, 27% Roussanne, 13% viognier, finished with 10% each of clairette blanche and sauvignon blanc.

The wine pays tribute to Jan Rossouw of the farm Vryguns, who, 78 years ago suggested to his fellow grape farmers in the Perdeberg area, that they should join forces and increase marketing strength. Which is exactly what they did, to become producers of mostly dryland, or non-irrigated vines, many of them venerable, yielding intensely flavoured grapes.  

This is a memorable wine, showing off the Cape ‘s ability to make outstanding white blends. The  nose offers a mix of stone, citrus and sub-tropical fruit, followed by the spectrum of summer fruit flavours on the palate along with vanilla from 20% oaking. The fruit is well balanced by fresh crispness, adding up to rich and memorable mouthfuls. Deserves to accompany gourmet creations based on shellfish, duck and chicken and Moroccan tagines. R120 from cellar door.

 

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Perdeberg-The-Vineyard-Collection-Cinsault-Dry-Rose-2018.jpg

 

Perdeberg has added a new rosé to the substantial Vineyard Collection. The label of the 2018 Cinsault Dry Rosé is self-explanatory – the alcohol levels are a pleasing low 11,5%, the dryland cinsault adds its own distinctive character to this light-bodied, fruity summer sipper that will also make an excellent autumn picnic mate. R70 from cellar door.

Another rosé from the Vineyard Collection, this time a Cap Classique sparkler produced from pinot noir. Silver-topped, offering inviting hues of salmon pink, the Perdeberg pinot noir rosé MCC 2015 combines bubbles with berry and watermelon flavours, medium-bodied with whiffs of characteristic biscuit on the palate. A delicious choice for Valentine celebrations..R120 from cellar door..

 

On to the reds, starting with the Perdeberg SSR, (Soft Smooth Red) 2017 from the recently introduced Soft Smooth range (just three labels, white, rosé and red), an entry-level, easy-drinking blend of shiraz, cinsault, cabernet sauvignon and cabernet franc. Partly wooded to add a little body to the juicy fruit and soft tannins, with alcohol levels at 14% this is a sweetish wine  that will go down well at braais and happily accompany pizza parties. The mountain zebra image is repeated in the markings of the screwcap. R45 from cellar door.

 

And, finally, back to The Vineyard Collection fo the Perdeberg Malbec 2017, a dark-hued medium-bodied wine lent backbone by a year in French oak. Accessible and destined to partner red meat dishes throughout the cooler months. R80 from cellar door.

            

 

Last modified on
0

Posted by on in Reviews

FIELD GUIDE TO WILD FLOWERS OF SOUTH AFRICA by John Manning, Struik Nature, 2019

FIELD GUIDE TO FYNBOS by John Manning, published by Struik Nature, 2018.

Invaluable and beautiful, these substantial paperbacks are both new editions, fully updated by author John Manning, an internationally respected botanist at the SA National Biodiversity Institute in Cape Town. He is also renowned for his botanical illustrations and flower photographs, many of which feature in both titles. Manning is a world authority on the Iris and Hyacinth families, has written and co-authored several other books on South African flora and is the recipient of several awards in recognition of his work.

He appears on the back cover of both books, against different floral backgrounds, along with his dachshunds adding a human and canine touch to the galleries of magnificent flowering species within the covers.

 

Field Guide to Wild Flowers of South Africa

b2ap3_thumbnail_Wildflower-COVER-New-Edition-1MB.jpg

The title presents nearly 500 pages of more than 1,100 flower species, and focuses on the more common, conspicuous and showy plants found in South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland. The text opens with an introduction covering diversity patterns, floral regions and vegetation types. with a key to identifying plant groups.

The preface points out that around 20 000 wild flowers are indigenous to the region, along with grasses, sedges, reeds and rushes with insignificant flowers and no single book can attempt to cover even a small percentage of all these. Those that have been included are all carefully described, for easier identification, along with their scientific details.

Each entry is accompanied by its botanical name, common names, its family, genus and species a clear colour photograph, a distribution map and a key to the plant’s flowering season.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Wild-Flowers-guideNEContents.jpg

Advice on how to use this guide to the best advantage makes important reading for any new enthusiast to the fascinating hobby of identifying what they find on hikes.  First find the right group, where plants have been divided into three categories, then consult the pictorial guide to wild flower families, then turn to the page where the relevant family is listed in the main body.

The entries for the 10 groups of flowering plants form the main body of the text, followed by a glossary of terms, further reading list and a detailed index of scientific names.

 

Field guide to Fynbos

b2ap3_thumbnail_bk-cover-FYNBOS-GUIDE.jpg

 

Another new edition, updating the original best-seller published in 2007, this one updated to reflect recent findings and taxonomy. More than 1 000 species are described,

The introduction identifies fynbos, offers a history of this unique and extraordinary African flora, defines it and describes its distribution. Its diversity, adaptations, reliance on fire, pollination and conservation.  There’ a guide to family groups, useful when accessing the entries which are arranged by these eight groups under which the entries are organised.

Each lists the scientific and common name, offers comparisons with  similar species, traditional uses, distribution map and key to flowering season, The captivating clear, colour photographs were taken by the author or by Colin Paterson-Jones, another renowned natural history photographer and writer. A detailed index of scientific names and glossary of terms completes the text.

 

To conclude, these two indispensable treasure chests of information for botanists and amateurs  are each packed into handy-sized formats where no square centimetre of paper is wasted!

Endpapers are used to illustrate flower parts and leaf shapes to complement the glossaries, while the edge of the back cover can be used as as a 20cm ruler to measure your floral finds.

 

Some fynbos beauties:

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_FIELD-GUIDE-TO-FYNBOS-PROTEA.jpg

 

Mimetes hottentoticus on Kogelberg peak

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_FIELD-GUIDE-TO-FYNBOS-3.jpg

 

Aspalathus costulata

b2ap3_thumbnail_FIELD-GUIDE-TO-FYNBOS-2.jpg.

Muraltie spinosa

 

Last modified on
Tagged in: Books Review
0

Posted by on in Reviews

 

THE WOMAN IN THE BLUE CLOAK by Deon Meyer, published by Hodder & Stoughton, UK, 2018.

b2ap3_thumbnail_BK-COVER-Deon-Meyer-latest.jpg

 

As usual, diverse strands of a necklace are  interwoven in Meyer’s impressive yet almost nonchalant way, as readers get caught up in a tale that strides across centuries and continents with consummate ease.

A woman’s body is discovered, naked and washed with bleach, on a rocky ledge at the top of Sir Lowry’s pass, on route to Elgin and the Overberg.

Detective Captain Benny Griessel is focussed on buying an engagement ring for his singing star friend Alexa, and wondering how he is going to pay for it.

In Holland a young man is fleeing from would-be captors as he runs through the night toward Rotterdam, then diverts to head to Delft....

Back in Cape Town the dead woman is identified, and Detectives Benny Griessel and his partner Cupido are on the case, wondering why a foreign visitor, who had been in the country just one day, was the murderer’s victim, and why she had wanted to go to Villiersdorp, a dorp near Elgin, that was not on the usual tourist trail.

Readers are taken to London to find out that the victim, Alicia Lewis,  was an expert in classical and antique art, who worked for an art loss register that searched for and recovered stolen art.

A painting now takes centre stage, a portrait of a woman, naked except for a blue cloak, attributed to Rembrandt ‘s star pupil Fabritius, and painted in Amsterdam in 1654. The woman was Rembrandt’s mistress and the painting had arrived at the Cape soon after where it ended up being sold to a member of the Van Reenen family who lived at that time in  Papenboom in Newlands. It was traced to a family descendant farming in the Villiersdorp district.

Of course Benny and Cupido get their man, an unlikely murderer, and it seems as if Alexa is going to receive a beautiful diamond ring from her lover, so all ends reasonably well, as things do in real life.

As always, the conversations between our much-loved detective Benny, and his partner Cupido, along with the action that moves across the city to the Cape winelands are realistic, accurate and convincing. 

Afrikaans fans got their dose of Griessel and co for Christmas, English addicts had to wait a little longer but both raced through this 140-page novella, finishing with appreciation and just one complaint. “It’s so short – hope the next one is back to normal. “

Last modified on
Tagged in: Book Review
0

Posted by on in News

 

 b2ap3_thumbnail_Platters--2019.jpg

                                                                                   

The Platter’s 2019 SA Wine Guide by Diners Club International was launched, as usual, in November. Its dusky pink cover manages to be another first, its 712 pages means it’s quite a lot fatter than the 2018 edition and, as usual, its meticulous editor and his team and publisher Jean-Pierre Rossouw have produced another indispensable handbook for the wine industry.

A total of 90 five-star wines for 2019 were announced and the hghest-scoring in each category was named the category Wine of the Year.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Platter-2019-Newcomer-Winery-of-the-Year--JP-Rossouw-presents-the-award-to-Erika-Obermeyer-2.jpg

The top accolade, Winery of the Year was expanded to encompass three pinnacles of winemaking: The Newcomer Winery of the Year recognises the cellar that records the best results as a first-time participant in the guide. Erika Obermeyer Wines was the recipient, and it was indeed so satisfying to see this talented, determined solo player receive the recognition she richly deserves. Mullineux winery scooped the award for Top Performing Winery of the Year, having built up an impressive track record in the years that the pair have produced wines in their Swartland cellar. The third accolade, the Editor’s Award went to Newton Johnson Vineyards in Upper Hemel-en-Aarde which is sure to be a hugely popular choice, given both the scintillating and consistent quality of their wines and the popularity of the producing family.

The 2019 edition also introduces 100-point scores, alongside the ‘Platter’s Stars’. This global standard, now combined with the Platter’s own star-rating system, should give international readers a better understanding of the Platter judges’ assessments.

For the rest, the usual popular and essential features are there, although one new icon will be very popular with winelovers seeking out wines produced from vines 35 years or older. The Old Vine Project has taken off both here and overseas, and it is thought that this country posseses more surviving old vines than any other in the world. The quality of many of the wine that are being produced from these survivors is little short of stupendous.

There is a wealth of information on routes, cellars, restaurants and more for travelers to the winelands, and the maps seem to be clearer than last y ears. The RRP is R270.

Last modified on
0

Posted by on in Restaurants

Make time for at least one visit to the Cape winelands this summer, as cellars gear up for harvest and aromas of crushed berries fill the air.

 

Delheim’s 2019 Harvest Festival

b2ap3_thumbnail_Delheim-Harvest-Festival-2019.jpg

 

 

This perennially popular event takes place on Saturday January26 with a pink theme to celebrate Delheim’s famed pinotage Rosé, one of the country’s first, launched back in 1976.

Tickets, which will be limited to 120 adults and 30 children cost : R650 per person and R150 for children (5-17 years old). Activities include grape-picking and stomping, vineyard tours and tractor rides, followed by a relaxed harvest feast: Think fresh salads, dolmades, baked breads, cheese & preserves, pickles, a variety of meats and fruit. Cheese straws, olives and grapes. Fynbos cupcakes and pinotage icecream round off the meal. Delheim wines are included, with juice for the small fry.

Book through Quicket. For more information, visit www.delheim.com or contact Delheim on marketing@delheim.com or 021 888 4600

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

GROOTE POST’S FIRST 2019 COUNTRY MARKET ON 27TH JANUARY

b2ap3_thumbnail_Groote-Post-Country-Market-nov2018_20190117-080340_1.jpg

Start the  year off with a day of family fun and relaxation at the Groote Post Country Market in the Darling Hills.

 Arts, crafts, homeware and décor, clothing, jewellery, accessories, toys, plants, flowers, delicious eats galore and more are on the menu, including Darling gourmet produce like  Weskus Worswa, Darling Honey, Darling Olives, the popular Darling Brew and of course Groote Post’s well-loved wines

Relax on the lawns under the trees and enjoy the popular music and entertainment provided by DJ Riaan. The little one will be kept busy with a variety of kiddies’ activities: tractor trips, guided horse rides, face painting, sand art and zorb balls to name a few. 

The Three Market Lucky Draws will take place at 12h30, 13h30 and 14h30, the winners each receiving a hamper with products from the market and Groote Post wine, but you must be present at the draw to win.

Groote Post’s award-winning restaurant, Hilda’s Kitchen, will be open as usual, but please note that booking is essential. Dogs are welcome but  must please be kept on a leash at all times.  

  • Entry to the Groote Post Country Market is free of charge.
  • Groote Post Country Market opening hours: 10h00 to 15h00
  • For further information on the Groote Post Country Market

Contact I Love Yzer: 022 451 2202 or info@iloveyzer.co.za

www.grootepostcountrymarket.co.za · Facebook.com/GrootePostCountryMarket · @GPCountryMarket

 

 

 

 

 

Franschhoek Summer Wines

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Franschhoek-Summer-Wines-2019-25.jpg

Another popular annual event, the 2019 garden party takes place on Saturday, February 02, from noon at the Leopard’s Leap Family Vineyards . Wines being poured included the Vigneron’s choice of MCC, white, rosé and light reds. They will complement the fare prepred by Chef Pieter de Jager and his team. Live music will add to the enjoyment.

Tickets, cost R280 per person, and pre-booking via www.webtickets.co.za is essential, as tickets are limited. The cost includes entry, a tasting glass, tastings of the wines on show as well as discount voucher to be used for the purchase of any show wines on the day. 

 For more info contact the Franschhoek Wine Valley offices on 021 876 2861 or email info@franschhoek.org.za

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

CELEBRATE THE 2019 WINE GRAPE HARVEST WITH NEDERBURG

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_NEDERBURG-Harvest-Day-12019-2.jpg

 

Nederburg Wines invites you to its annual Harvest at Dusk Festival at the farm in Paarl, on Saturday, 16 February 2019.  Join in the fun of picking and stomping grapes, and kick back and relax while feasting on freshly-prepared fare matched with award-winning wines, while listening to the sweet sounds of popular South African musician, Mathew Gold

Chef Lisa Cilliers of The Red Table restaurant, situated in Nederburg’s historic manor house, will be serving up a bountiful harvest feast of family-style table platters, delicious mezze, ; farm-fresh salads and vegetables to accompany delicious slow-roasted meat; as well as ‘korrelkonfyt’ and peach upside down cake served with vanilla ice cream for dessert.

Nederburg wines will be available for purchase, as will soft drinks, mineral waters, coffees and teas. 

Date:               Saturday, 16 February 2019

Time:              16:00 till late

Cost:               R460 per person (including Nederburg sparkling wine, the harvest experience, musical entertainment, the harvest feast and service charge)

R220 per child aged 6 to 12 (including a soft drink, juice or water on arrival, the harvest experience, musical entertainment, the harvest feast and service charge)

Free for those aged 6 and under.

Booking is essential. For reservations, go to www.webtickets.co.za.

 

 

 

Grande Provence Harvest Festival  -  a barrel of family fun 

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Grande-Provence-harvestfest-.jpg

 

February is harvest time in the winelands and the date to diarise for the Grande Provence Harvest festival is  Saturday, 23 February 2019.

 

Get ready to pick and stomp grapes with the whole family to the jovial beat of the Kaapse Klopse  followed by a harvest table  laden with delicious fare and the  sounds of live contemporary music.  With plenty of action for the children including a jumping castle, face painting,  lawn games and tractor rides, adults can look forward to a laidback day of country food, fine wines and a cellar tour and tasting.

Festivities kick off at 10h00. Tickets cost R650 for adults and R325 for children under 12. Booking is essential. For more information call: (021) 876 8600 or email reservations@grandeprovence.co.za

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

“PESTO & WINE PLAY” AT NEIL ELLIS WINES

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Neil-Ellis-cellar-panoramic-view---Copy.jpg

 

At this family-owned winery on the Helshoogte pass slopes, visitors can take part in a food and wine adventure called Pesto and Wine Play. Four pesto recipes have been created to pair with four Neil Ellis wines and visitors can discover their own choice of combos. The four, which are served with pita bread, are Chickper curry pesto, beetroot and almond pesto, mint and pecan nut pesto and kale and cashew nut pesto.

The four wines with which to pair them are

Amica Sauvignon Blanc: A complex, vibrant, barrel-fermented Sauvignon Blanc from a single vineyard in the Jonkershoek Valley with notes of white florals, nectarines, lime and lemon.

Whitehall Chardonnay: An elegant Burgundian-style Chardonnay from a single vineyard in the Elgin Valley with youthful lime and melon aromatics, gorgeous ripe citrus notes, great texture and freshness.

Bottelary Hills Pinotage: A multi-faceted Pinotage from 20-year-old bush vine vineyards in the Bottelary Hills, showing dark plum, cherry and blackberry fruit with elegant floral notes and a touch of dark chocolate.

Jonkershoek Cabernet Sauvignon: The estate’s signature Cabernet Sauvignon with all the hallmarks of the Jonkershoek Valley. Known for its classical structure and perfect balance of elegance and fruit power, it has complex notes of blue and black small berry fruit with touches of cedar and mint. 

The cost of the experience is R100 pp. For enquiries and bookings (bookings only essential for groups): 021 887 0649 or info@neilellis.com. The venue is open Mon – Fri from 10h00 – 16h30, and on Sat and public hols from 10h00 – 17h00/

 

Tel: 021 887 0649 · Email: info@neilellis.com · Website: www.neilelllis.com

Last modified on
0

Posted by on in News

 

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Sijnn-new-packaging-duo.JPG

 

Wine of Malgas is the phrase under the Sijnn name on the contemporary labels. A name long connected with holiday homes, great angling and a venerable ferry, but now also a wine ward with a single cellar producing singular, exceptional and delicious wines.

The black and white photograph below graphically illustrates the stony path – well, a road of sorts – to the low cellar with its curved roof .

A trio of recent releases took me right back to the memorable evening when the cellar, nearly but not quite complete, opened its doors to visitors for a celebration –

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Sijnn-003.jpg

 

Founder and co-owner David Trafford took us through the young vineyards where bush vines had settled as part of the indigenous landscape, among two distinct soils which vie for sheer quantities of stone they carry . They did not deter vines from not only surviving, but thriving in this apparently inhospitable climate with its low rainfall and constant wind.

The Breede river made a  blue and placid contrast as, far below, it snaked around hills and through dales on its last 25km to the Indian Ocean.

During that evening I sampled the maiden vintage of Sijnn White, and became a fan for life. As I have said before, more than once, white blends, especially when chenin-based are perhaps the Cape’s finest achievement . The Sijnn example is not only as fine as any other but offers unique characteristics that can be attributed to both terroir and minimalist handling.

 

 

 

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Sijnn-White-2017.jpg

The team has now released the Sijnn white 2017 and, unsurprisingly, this is what I opened first, knowing well that I was going to savour every sip.

Comprising 84% chenin, 13% viognier with roussanne making the remaining 3% , this is the 10th vintage , from vines now 12 and seven years old. A good year for the vintage. grapes were picked early, some bunch- pressed the balance basket- pressed. The wine was fermented in French oak, of which 11% was new, for 10 months before being lightly fined and bottled, unfiltered, in December 2017.

The wine is golden straw-coloured, with a nose presenting wafts of fruit sparked with wild fennel. On the palate, layers of complex flavour to relish, some peach  and a little lemon, overlaid with dusty spices which don't  mask the essential  freshness. I did not detect as much fruit as the tasting notes suggest, but came across a subtle wildness – herbs and minerals – with hints of maritime brine. Irresistible .

Their tasting notes suggest that its ideal on its own or with fish and seafood. Agreed. But it’s also a white that can enhance several Cape Malay classics, -including bobotie, especially when made with fish, chicken curry and chicken breyani. R280 at the cellar.

Sijnn Reds 2011 and 2015

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Sijnn-Red-2015.jpg

 

 

The 2015 vintage is acknowledged as one of the Cape’s finest, and equally so for Sijnn, where the wine was made in the stone cellar for the first time, avoiding the long journey to Stellenbosch. It was also winemaker Charla Haasbroek’s maiden vintage as she produced the 2015 Red using 47% syrah, 19% touriga nacional, 19% trincadeira, finished with nearly equal quantities of mourvèdre and cabernet. The vines, now 10 and 11 years old reaching maturity and – with the weather playing its part – the harvest was picked and sorted early, fermented in small open tanks and oak vats. Natural fermentation preceded a basket pressing and malolactic fermentation in 225 litre French oak for the first year. Bottled by hand in December 2016, unfined and unfiltered.

Already hugely enjoyable, but worth squirreling away as well, the freshness is there, no cultivar dominating; on the palate concentrated fruit and a little fennel well balanced by tannic structure. Spicy, rich and with a long finish, it features . alcohol levels of  just over 14%, This wine  calls for red meat given gourmet treatment, but will also complement rich dishes based on black mushroom. R350 from the cellar.

Because it took a while to open up and show its charms, the 2011 Sijnn Red has been released only now. The year saw a dry windy summer and the vines were irrigated during the growing and again during the ripening process, but otherwise left to themselves. Back in Stellenbosch the grapes were crushed into open tanks and oak vats. Spontaneous natural fermentation followed with maturation  in barrel for two years before bottling in January 2013. The nose says Malgas, the palate is rich with firm tannins and its easy to see this is a wine that will go on offering enjoyment for several years to come. The wildness of venison and game birds will be enhanced by this blend – with syrah comprising over half along with 19% touriga nacional, 17% each of trincadeira and mourvèdre,  finished with 6% each trincadeira and cab. It sells for R250 at the cellar door.

Finally, a word of appreciation to the team who compiled the information: well-written, concise and accurate, comprising everything a reviewer would like to know. If all the spec sheets and releases that come my way were as smart as these, my emails would be reduced by half.

For more info see www.sijnn.co.za

Last modified on
0

Posts by Calendar

Loading ...