food-wine-blog

Myrna Robins

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Login
    Login Login form

Fare that's homegrown, heritage, humble and honest!

Posted by on in Cookbooks
  • Font size: Larger Smaller
  • Print

HOMEGROWN  by Bertus Basson, published by Russel Wasserfall Food, Jacana Media, 2016.

b2ap3_thumbnail_CKBK-Homegrown.jpg

It would be difficult to find a more fitting title for this collection of recipes, memories and snatches of  Basson’s life.  He is one of South Africa’s most down-to-earth chefs, describing himself as “an Afrikaner kid who didn’t eat his vegetables” and that the “flavours, smells and memories of growing up in South Africa make me the cook I am.”

Bertus gained immediate fame as the judge on the television show The Ultimate Braai Master, but before that had built a fine gastronomic reputation as head of  the renowned Overture restaurant in Stellenbosch   - along with a couple of others and a catering company.  In his foreword he offers a great tribute to his wife Mareli who is as keen on cooking as he is, as curious about good food everywhere, and who he describes as his “perfect parner for this journey...”

Given the tough time that sugar is having in  current  health-wise diets and articles, cookbooks and television shows, Homegrown offers a nice contrast by opening with a favourite dessert in  Childhood, the first chapter. It stars  sugar, cream, caramel, confectionery,  you name it...   It’s followed by his Kos Kos salad, canned pilchards in tomato sauce teamed with lettuce, cucumber, avo, tomato and soft- boiled eggs, mayonnaise-dressed with capers adding a little sophistication. Messy and delicious, it’s another  childhood staple that Basson  describes as poor man’s Nicoise.  This nostalgic section also offers braaied snoek, pumpkin pie, sweet mustard tongue, frikkadels, and melktert with variations.

Friends and family from his ‘hood who cook and bake star next, with Bertus featuring  both the characters and their specialities. These  range from bread and scones to Gatsby and peri-peri chicken, from  shisanyama of mielies and braaied brisket to  boerewors rolls, pies, and pannekoek.  To finish,  commonplace guavas get a lift with classic muscadel-spiked  egg custard.

In the chapter dubbed Ingredients, things go upmarket somewhat – soft-cured biltong is served with greens, Parmesan shavings,  anchovies and black olives. Whole roast lamb’s liver is paired with sorrel  or parsnips and green beans, and Basson’s favourite, black  mussels come with beer, bacon and seaweed. Octopus shares a plate with  gnocchi and nasturtium paste.

There’s much more before the final meal, a long  family Sunday lunch where slow- roasted  leg of lamb and veggies are  followed by his wife Mareli’s  popular dessert cake, topped with figs, pecans and cream.

The text is interspersed with a great selection of relevant photographs – at the sea, in the garden, on the farm, in the kitchen. Guest cooks are photographed in action or showing off their culinary creations, and the food pictures are appetising as well.

This collection offers   an enjoyable range of mostly traditional South African fare with a few twists and turns and little ceremony. The text finishes with a glossary and index. The editing could have been a little tighter here and there –  ingredients missing in either the list or the method  were noted, although I did not go through every recipe – but one feels that neither Bertus nor most readers will let these typos upset them

Last modified on
0

Posts by Calendar

Loading ...