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Myrna Robins

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Food

News, recipes, culinary events and cookbook reviews.

Subcategories from this category: Restaurants, Events, Cookbooks, Recipes

Posted by on in Events

 

Harvest, romance and summer celebrations – the Boland lays them on!

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 The popular Stellenbosch Street Soirees are back. These are bi-monthly events  where quality wines, cool tunes and country fare combine to make street parties to remember. Hosted by the Stellenbosch Wine Routes, visitors can savour sundowner wines and early suppers as street stalls set up to offer their fare and wares under the oaks. Each soiree features a different choice of cellars and caterers. Tickets cost R100 for entry and 12 wine tasting tokens. Events take place from 6 – 8pm. Next one is on January 24 followed by February 7 and 21. For more info, contact 021 886 4310 or go to www.wineroute.co.za

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The annual Stellenbosch Harvest Parade will see the Cape minstrels, drum majorettes and brass bands take over the streets of the city of oaks on Saturday January 27. Marking the start of harvest season, its a tribute to the winemaking community, as decorated tractors and trailers from many cellars start their journey through town from 9am. A harvest blessing and awards ceremony takes place at the town hall an hour later. For more info, visit www.wineroute.co.za.

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The Delheim harvest celebration, a popular annual event, also takes place on Saturday January 27 and a few changes have been introduced to the 2018 programme.  It’s a one-day affair this year, but still includes grape picking and stomping,  good food, fine wine and live music. Guests will be seated at one long table and numbers are limited to 120 so early booking is advised. The fun starts at 11.30, with picking, and the ticket price of R650 includes a bottle of Delheim wine and lunch. Children's tickets cost R120, those under four get in free.To book, email charlotte@delheim.com or contact her at 021 888 4600.

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Cool elegance, white outfits and superb white, rosé, sparkling and light red wines are on the menu at Franschhoek Summer Wines, taking place on February 3 at Leopard’s Leap family vineyards.  These refreshing wnes will be paired with delicious food, while live music will add final touches to a memorable day in the valley.
Tickets, cost R220 per person, and can be purchased through 
www.webtickets.co.za.  Pre-bookin is essential as tickets are limited. The cost includes entry, a complimentary tasting glass and 15 wine tasting coupons,.

 
For more info contact the Franschhoek Wine Valley offices on 021 876 2861 or email
info@franschhoek.org.za
 

 

 

Now here's a novel pairing!

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Popcorn may not be the first item to come to mind when contemplating Valentines month, but Stellenbosch Hills  has found some gourmet flavoured corn to complement their Polkadraai range of wines. So for the month of love, the cellar will offer  a delicious lineup that includes the sparkling Polkadraai Sauvignon Blanc Brut with banana-coated popcorn and their moreish Chenin Blanc/Sauvignon Blanc 2017 with salted caramel popcorn. Dark chocolate corn  is paired with the Pinotage/Merlot 2015 while the Pinot Noir Sparkling Rosé enivens strawberry popcorn.

The pairings cost R50 a head and takes about 30 minutes, although visitors are invited to try the other Stellenbosch Hills  wines as well. As always, visit on a Friday, and buy five Polkadraa wines and get the 6th free of charge!

Opening times are from 9am to 5pm and Saturday from  10am to 3pm. Pop and cheer! Book ahead by calling 021 881 3828.

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Posted by on in Food

 

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By Durbanville standards, this is a big farm, covering 840ha, supporting grain, cattle and sheep and, more recently, 50ha of vines. It joins others in the region which have  celebrated their tercentenary, as first owner, that prominent pioneer Olof Bergh of the VOC was granted the land by Simon van der Stel as the 17th century drew to a close.

 

It has taken present owners, fourth generation Brinks, André and Ronelle, years of hard work, renovation, restoration, and wine production to reach the stage when they held a media day recently, partly to mark 120 years of Brink family ownership. Simultaneously they celebrated the  release of the new vintages in rebranded packaging, and  of  their maiden cap classique and pinotage.

 

Unlike some of its fellow farms, Groot Phesantekraal is really rustic, with suburbia still some way from its boundaries (long may this continue). The family occupies the main farmstead, while the private tasting room still retains reminders of its early role as hen house. If the weather is kind, visitors can settle on the terrace for wine and order a cheese and charcuterie platter.

 

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 The airy restaurant – one of the oldest buildings - spent its first 250 years as a stable – and the feeding troughs attest to that, as does the old stone floor – where 10cm heels are not recommended!  ChefJean van Deventer presented an early spring menu, that included braised pork belly with Dauphine potatoes, roasted onion puree, apple chutney and fried polenta with beer-battered veggies as a vegetarian option. There was well spiced kabeljou paired with chorizo and a sweet potato risotto, and dessert of apple frangipani tart with roasted apple cinnamon icecream made a fine finale. I would head to this venue for their Saturday morning brunch, as the menu is tempting, and prices, while not in the budget category  , are acceptable given the quality of fare.

 

As I arrived at the farm late, I missed out on a flute of the new cap classique (R120) made by winemaker Etienne Louw, formerly of Altydgedacht. But my colleagues all enjoyed their welcome bubbly, as I did my tasting sample.

 

 Louw also made the 2017 Groot Phesantekraal  sauvignon blanc 2017, (R72) which has already garnered a Veritas Double Gold and made it to the Top 10 in the Sauvignon Blanc awards. It is a beautiful wine, presenting a complex mix of fruit, both tropical and citrus blanced by  crisp but not over-acidic mouthfuls – there's  less of the distinctive  dusty Durbanville verdancy which characterises many of the valley’s sauvignons.

 

I only managed a couple of sips of the 2017 chenin blanc, sourced from 55-year-old bush vines , but I wish I could have tasted more of this dry, fruity, heritage wine, selling at R50. Ditto the 2015 cabernet which has attracted gold from Michelangelo and is, by all accounts, both accessible yet elegant,  and priced at R120.

 

The farm’s flagship white is their Anna de Koning chenin blanc 2016/7, a barrel-fermented single vineyard limited release that is rich, offering concentrated fruit and nuts , opulent, elegant, and a worthy addition to the present generation of fine wooded chenins. mostly found in the  Breedekloof and Swartland regions. Its a wine that could well complement Middle Eastern specialities where fruit and nuts add flavour and crunch to layered rice and chicken or lamb. At R120 its an affordable addition to our ever-increasing choice of champion chenins.

 

I did not get to taste the farm’s pinotage Berliet 2016.

 

 

Groot Phesantekraal is off Klipheuwel Way, and its contact number is 021 825 0060  It’s  great to have another beautiful Durbanville farm to add to the hospitable collection across the Tygerberg, and this destination is one that both history buffs and wine lovers will  enjoy immensely. 

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Posted by on in Restaurants

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There are very few who do not enjoy riding the rails and many who claim that train  is by far the best way to travel. The experience of rattling along in carriages, especially when pulled by a proper steam engine, is an experience both unique and nostalgic, so that many visitors, local and international, mourned the passing of rail transport to Franschhoek.

The station, however, stayed intact and was maintained , not like other forlorn deserted stations across the South African platteland. Occasionally trips were organised to farms along the line – I remember one, in particular, a splendid journey to Bellingham to mark, I think, both a wine launch and the restoration of the old farmstead.

When doing research for my Franschhoek Food cookbook nearly a decade ago, there was talk of reviving the rail link shared by several farms along the R45 – while nothing has come of that  there was great excitement some five years ago when the Franschhoek Wine Tram service was launched, taking guests on a short journey on rails in a 32-seater open-sided tram which stopped at two wine estates in the village. Brainchild of the Blyth family, who no doubt spent many frustrating hours dealing with the logistics of their venture, from bureaucracy downwards, their vision and persistence are worthy of thunderous applause!

The tram proved to be an instant success, offering local and international visitors a fun way to travel that was adventurous, but less hazardous than tasting wine on horseback.

Earlier this month, the Blyth family and GM Brett Garner hosted officials,  media and  visitors to the new Franschhoek Wine Tram Double Deck trams, at Groot Drakenstein station. The service now embraces some 22 wine farms, spanning the valley’s wine route. Travellers can spend between 30 and 60 minutes on board as part of a full day R220 wine tour which extends as far as Vrede en Lust in Simondium.

From the wine tram website, we learn that a combo of tram and tram-bus transports passengers around a loop of stops. They can choose to hop on and hop off for wine tastings, cellar tours, lunch or just stroll through the vineyards.There are six hop-on hop-off routes to choose from, each visiting eight wine estates in different parts of the beauteous valley, while a narrative covers the history of the valley and its wine.

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As Western Cape Minister of Economic Opportunities Alan Winde remarked   in his launch address, this new expanded service will allow more than 120 000 guests to enjoy the trip in the current tourist season.

Just another good reason to make sure that the stupendous Franschhoek valley is on every traveller’s must-do itinerary this summer and autumn.

See www.winetram.co.za.  For more information  call Brett Garner on 27(0)83  260 0453.

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Posted by on in Events

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SEASON OF SAUVIGNON SETS DURBANVILLE A-TINGLE!

 

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A bakers dozen of inviting farms makes up the Durbanville Wine Valley, a group that is popular both collectively and individually. The annual Season of Sauvignon takes place over the weekend of October 28 -29, and is a celebration that needs little publicity, as its hugely popular with both locals and visitors. This year 11 farms are taking part, offering a variety of festivities, pouring their sauvignons and offering entertainment and good food to boot.

 

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See www.durbanvillewine.co.za for the detailed programme and contemplate your chosen itinerary. Book your festival tickets via www.webtickets.co.za.

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FRANSCHHOEKS BUBBLY FEST MARKS THE START OF THE FESTIVE SEASON.

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The Magic of Bubbles, the annual Cap Classique and Champagne Festival takes place on December 2 and 3, and guests are asked to dress to impress in black and white. As in previous years the grand marquee will be pitched at the Huguenot Monument, and the local and imported bubblies will be accompanied by stylish fare from local restaurants.

Tickets cost R375 a head, and include tasting glass and coupons. Children under 18 enter free of charge. Book through www.webtickets.co.za. Those paying with Mastercard receive a 10% discount on ticket prices and purchases.

 

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Eikendal Vineyards swirls Cheesecake & Wine Pairings

 

 

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This popular Stellenbosch destination always pops up with a new way to pair their fine wines with tasty bites. This summer it's cheesecake and wine pairings, where the cellar’s crisp sauvignon blanc is matched to lemon cheesecake, the berry cheesecake with their sauvignon blanc/chardonnay blend and their Janina unwooded chardonnay is partnered with salted caramel cheesecake.

The Eikendal Cheesecake & Wine Pairing Experience costs R80 per person and will be swirling the senses from October 2017 until April 2018, Tuesdays to Sundays between 10:00 and 16:30. To book contact Chantal-Lee at 021 855 1422 or send an email toinfo@eikendal.co.za.

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Posted by on in Restaurants

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As I write this the ever-expanding rock – and green – outdoor festival Rocking the Daisies in is full swing near Darling. Not only is this becoming an international event, as claimed by the organisers, but this year’s events caused ructions in the academic world as UCT students requested being excused for exams as they had booked tickets for the fest.  In our era we would have probably been carted off to psychiatrists if we’d tried that one on...

But I digress. A couple of weeks ago I spent a few days with my family in Darling, just ahead of their annual flower festival which marked its centenary this year. While we missed this impressive milestone. we were in good time to wander among fields  of daisies in pastel hues in the tranquil Tienie Versfeld reserve as the bulbs were poking up stems with the promise of blooms to come. Rolling hills  of canola made a golden backdrop.

Darling town is laidback and hospitable, rustic but efficient when it comes to meeting visitor needs. We had booked for a matinee of Adapt or Fly at Evita se Perron, it was a magical hour that finished with the promise of Uys impersonating Julius Malema next time around – I can hardly wait. We spent a happy half hour at Darling Sweet – along with a sizable group of enthusiastic customers – sampling the irresistible toffees produced by the Hentie van der Merwe and Frits van Ryneveld’s staff in a glassed-off section of the shop. This is a success story based on hard work, good marketing and fail-proof recipes for both confectionery and human resources: In a handsome Edwardian building , once the home of Darling’s General Dealer, the partners’ sweet production is in full swing on one side, while on the other free samples of their considerable range of toffees and toffee spreads invite tasting. Then choices are made, and the till rings constantly as happy customers leave clutching their goodies. The enterprise has provided employment for 20 locals, has become a must-see destination on  the tourist itinerary, and, best of all, these handmade toffees contain no artificial flavourings, or colorants and cont no preservatirves. What, I asked Fritz, do you use for the fat ingredient? Butter, of course, only butter” came the answer. I am hooked!

We went to sample local artisanal beer and agreeable fare at a evening show in the industrial area, and by way of contrast, joined an elegant midday wine and olive tasting at Ormonde farm Their recently released NJB sauvignon blanc 2017, only available from the farm is a tribute to a former patriarch and is a classy, if fairly pricy, wine.

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For me, a highlight was a visit to The Darling Wine Shop, the little emporium of well-known négociant Charles Withington, and stocked with a delicious mélange of vinous delights. I was sorry that the owner was not there, having met him previously years ago, but as we left the shop, he and his wife Janet arrived. As it was closing time, there was little time to talk, but we have since corresponded on email, while savouring two of Withington’s wines, which I have reviewed separately. See WITHINGTON DUO – Winning wines of Darling

We ordered takeout pizza, and ambled through streets lined with both Victorian and Edwardian homes, - gentle, unshowy architecture in keeping with the atmosphere prevailing in the town. When the international sophistication of glamorous wineland destinations threatens to overwhelm, turn tail and head for Darling, an inexpensive and soothing remedy presided over by real people. As a bonus, you may discover some fine wines.

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