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Myrna Robins

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Food

News, recipes, culinary events and cookbook reviews.

Subcategories from this category: Restaurants, Events, Cookbooks, Recipes

Posted by on in Events

More events to fill early summer weekends with country air, fine wines, delectable fare and good company…

Bid October farewell in style at the popular Country Market at Groote Post which have returned along with a new addition to the attractions in forms of a trail run.

The market, which is free to enter, is open from 10am – 3pm on Sunday October 30 and guests can relish artisanal foods, arts and crafts, as well as home-ware and décor. All the favourite stalls will be back, plus a few new ones to broaden the range. Darling locals will be out in force with gourmet produce including breads, cheese, mushrooms, charcuterie, wors, sauces, olive oils and more. Fine fare to be consumed between sips of Groote Post’s well-loved wines and popular craft beers from Darling Brew. There are two new rieslings to look out for, one a 2016 vintage of the unwooded Riesling and another, limited edition of a partially wooded Riesling the Barrique 2014. More on these when I have had a chance to sample them..

Plenty for children to do as well and the award-winning restaurant, Hilda’s Kitchen, will be open as usual, but booking is essential. Although pets are welcome, dogs must be on a leash at all times. Visitors arriving without their dogs on a leash will be given an option to buy one from the SPCA stall or hire one at the information stall.

The new trail run presents three options, the 18km Bobbejaanberg Challenge (R 180.00), the13.5km Atlantic View (R 150.00) and the 4km Ommie-Dam Fun Run (R 80.00) Entries: https://www.entryninja.com/events/event/7661-groote-post-country-run

For further information on the Groote Post Country Market Contact: Eldré Strydom: 082 877 6677 or eldre@iloveyzer.co.za.

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Perdeberg, perennially popular winery, is holding its annual Family Festival on Saturday November 5, from 10am to 5pm.

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This year visitors will find a new function venue, that will house the art expo, crafts, and provide indoor seating for those who prefer this. Outside, a marqee and umbrellas will provide shad on the lawns, where you can sip those renowned chenins and enjoy your choice of fast fare.

There will be a structured chenin blanc tasting that will be repeated twice in the barrel cellar for just R20 a head. Children will enjoy their own supervised area with plenty of play and a petting zoo.

Before the festival, the cellar will host a family fun run through their vineyards on Monday October 31- choose between a 5 or 10km route. For more information and bookings for Run The Vine, please visit www.runthevines.co.za

Entrance tickets cost R80 and are available through iTickets or at the door. Under -18s go in free of charge.

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For Gauteng connoisseurs Cinsaut wines in a tutored tasting

 
Three top South African winemakers will lead a unique Cinsaut tasting in Johannesburg next month hosted by Corlien Morris, owner of the popular boutique Wine Menu.

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 They are Ian Naudé (Adoro Wines), Francois Haasbroek (Blackwater Wine) and Duncan Savage (Savage Wines), all of whom are making Cinsaut in the same cellar  
Cinsaut, which is making a great comeback in the same vein as its sister chenin blanc has done in spectacular sytle, was earlier known in South Africa as Hermitage and was famously crossed with Pinot Noir in 1925 to create Pinotage. Cinsault produces varietal wines that are light in colour and low in tannin, often displaying bright cherries, earth and spice.
 Says Morris:  “We will taste eight different wines - and in particular those made from old vineyards - the Cinsaut grapes will tell their own story in the glass – it is all about terroir.”
After the panel discussion guests will have the opportunity to taste and buy the winemakers’ other wines

The Cinsaut Evening will take place at Rosebank's Clico Boutique Hotel on Wednesday, November 9, at 18.00. Cost is R160 per person. Seating is limited so early booking is essential to avoid disappointment.Contact Corlien Morris on 011 440-5498 or via email at corlien@winemenu.co.za.

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 Celebrate the Circle of Life with one of several Waterkloof Estate excursions

Waterkloof biodynamic estate overlooking False Bay invites nature-lovers to enjoy a farm and winemaking biodynamic tour on the crest of the Schapenberg in the Helderberg. Farm manager Christiaan Loots – the driving force behind Waterkloof’s cutting edge, environmentally responsible farming methods – will lead this edu-eco tour which illustrates biodynamic and organic farming practice.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Waterkloof-tours-4.jpg. With groups limited to 12 people, visitors will meet its beautiful Percheron horses that are used instead of tractors, to plough, compost, spray and harvest.

 An alternative is the new Tour With Us experience which includes a cellar visit, wine tasting nd, a two-course lunch at the estate’s Top 10 restaurant, in groups limited to six.b2ap3_thumbnail_waterkloof-tours-1.jpg

-Visitors can also explore the Schapenberg’s dramatic surroundings on horseback. The Ride With Us adventure offers a picturesque, 60-minute trail ride through the area and ends with a two-course lunch at Waterkloof.

All excursions must be pre-booked. For bookings, contact Zandri at Tel: 021 858 1491 or send email to zandri@waterkloofwines.co.za., Activity cost* per person: Circle of Life Biodynamic Tour  R100; Tour With Us R520; Guided Walk  R630 and Ride With Us: R670   

           

 

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Posted by on in Events

This round-up of events first appeared on the front of Life of the Cape Argus on Monday October 17.

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Wonderful wine, alfresco feasts and country music are a winning combo. Add a background of some of the most beautiful winelands on the planet, and the temptation is irresistible. A preview of early summer events.

Countrywide tastings of South Africa’s finest wines take place in October and November, while the wine regions of the Western Cape lure visitors with enticing festivals that star a lot more than good wine. Many of them are geared to family entertainment for a weekend of good food, live music and children’s activities, while soft drinks and even craft beer augment the beverage choice. Make time to grab sunhats and baskets and head for your choice of rural delights.

This roundup of fests and events is largely chronological: log onto the relevant websites for more information. Veritas is the largest and longest-running wine contest in South Africa and wine bottles bearing their medal stickers are sought-after by consumers. Take advantage of the line-up of all double gold and gold winners at the Veritas A Taste of the Best event, on October 18 at the CTICC at 5pm. Wine, brandy and Qualité cheeses will be available and tickets cost R140. Veritas will host similar events in Johannesburg (October 25), Durban, (November 10), Port Elizabeth (November 16) and Knysna (November 17 and 18.) Visit www.veritas.co.za or send an e-mail to info@veritas.co.za for details.

Fashion may be fickle but sauvignon blanc remains a firm favourite among winelovers throughout the season. Fans will be in seventh heaven at Durbanville Wine Valley’s Season of Sauvignon over the weekend of October 29 – 30. Offering a total of 12 farms to visit, member cellars not only present their latest sauvignon blanc but will pour the Durbanvaille Twelve 2016, an exciting blend made from combining one ton of sauvignon grapes from all the valley farms. Every producer offers individual attractions along with their wines, which vary in style but share those distinctive Durbanville characteristics. Visit www.durbanvillewine.co.za for details. Those who savour history with their wine should not miss out on Altydgedacht, the 17th century original wine farm in the valley. The original ringmuur, slave bell and cellar stand proud, evidence of winemaking across more than three centuries, while the 2016 sauvignon presents a wonderful mix of aromas and flavours – at R75 it’s a bargain buy.

Gauteng is the only province favoured by this year’s organisers of RMB Winex 2016, taking place at the Sandton Convention Centre from October 26 – 28 at 5pm. As always, it offers a feast of over 800 prestigious wines, accompanied by celebrities and winemakers and a programme of launches and tastings. Book through Computicket or pay at the door and visit www.winex.co.za for list of exhibitors and other information.

POT, or Pinotage- on- Tap needs little introduction to the thousands who lap up coffee-chocolate pinotage. The original source of this popular wine is Diemersfontein farm in Wellington, where the home fest takes place on October 29, serving the new wine straight from barrel, alongside delectable fare and live entertainment. This year music lovers will be treated to a live performance directed by legendary Richard Cock with talented musicians, including the lead singer of Freshly Ground, the Cape Town Brass band, Jazz Trio and Wynberg Boys High steel drum brand. Book through Computicket.

There are many reasons to head south to the wild and lovely Cape Agulhas area, with its salt-laden winds and b2ap3_thumbnail_Elim-wine-fest-2.jpgcool-climate wines of the Elim wine ward. They are marking their 20th birthday with the Elim Wine Festival on November 05, an event worth contemplating by both connoisseurs and consumers eager to meet a bunch of dedicated winemakers who produce elegant, intense wines, some of which are crafted on farms dedicated to the conservation of local flora and fauna. Craft beer will be available, including the products of South Africa’s most southerly brewery while new vintages of Black Oystercatcher, Strandveld and Giant Periwinkle wines will be released. Country fare and farm products will tempt visitors of all ages. The venue is Black Oystercatcher farm. Visit www.elimwines.co.za for details.

Stellenbosch remains the Cape’s largest and most famous wine region with the oak-lined streets of the town retaining timeless appeal for locals and travellers. The bi-monthly Stellenbosch Street Soirees or summer parties, which have proved hugely popular, start again on November 16 on Drostdy Street. Wine farms bring their wares to share with that of food vendors, cars are banned, and musicians add live music to the after-work scene. Tickets, which include tasting glass, cost R70, giving access to sampling all wines on show. It’s cool and casual and very Cape. Log on to www.wineroute.co.za for more.

As the year winds down, the festive season starts up and the annual Franschhoek Cap Classique and Champagne Festival, or Magic of Bubbles as it is dubbed, is the stylish, sophisticated, and trendy event that mark its arrival.

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It’s also the social place to be seen at over the weekend of December 3 – 4 when guests gather in the grand marquee at the Huguenot Monument. This year’s fest, sponsored by Mastercard, sees the bubblies of local producers share space with a selection of imported champagnes from France, while the valley restaurants compete in presenting delicious goodies to partner them. The best-dressed couple on both days wins a generous gift card. Tickets cost R350, the festivities start at 12 noon, and bookings are through www.webtickets.co.za

Rickety Bridge is among the wine farms taking part and you may wish to sample their delectable all-chardonnay Blanc de Blancs 2012, just released to great acclaim. It offers all that bubbly lovers want, from a fine mousse, delightful wafts of green apple and buttered toast adding richness to balance crisp freshness, an aperitif that will also partner summer fare with panache.

And then, as the festive season reaches it zenith, Gabrielskloof estate outside Bot River invites weary city folk to head to the Overberg for some hassle-free Christmas shopping at their annual Favourite Things Market taking place from December 16-18. Entrance is free, olives and wine and a range of country produce is on sale, alongside designer jewellery, exquisite quilts, handmade toys and intricate ceramics. Find out more by e-mailing Nicolene at nicolene@gabrielskloof.co.za.

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Posted by on in Restaurants

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They say it does us the world of good to wallow in luxury occasionally. Certainly I woke fresh and raring to go after a great night’s sleep in my inviting, soothing, bedroom, its stylish pastel décor livened by bedside lights doubling as branches of a ‘tree’, upon which lifelike birds perched, and a china hound-dog that kept watch over me from an adjacent desk.

Experiencing DB&B at Leeu House, BAS Singh’s enchanting boutique hotel in Franschhoek’s main road, ticked all the boxes and then some. Getting there stressed and chilly, first pleasure is finding that staff miraculously keep a couple of parking places outside the front gate empty – seemingly always! My car was whisked away while I greeted both Nelson Mandela on the left lawn and Ghandi on the right before going inside to register.

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Spaciousness is usually synonomous with luxury, and certainly my huge bedroom with its sitting area and large bathroom added to the pampered feel as I explored. The cabinet containing crockery, glasses, bar fridge and snacks invited ransacking – for the purposes of reporting, of course! Well, the snacks are mostly frightfully healthy (dried fruit and veggie crisps etc) but I did find a packet of little chocolate –coated biscuit balls to go with my tea. Guests also get a 375ml bottle of both the red and white house wines – BAS white and BAS rooi, both approachable, enjoyable aperitifs.

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Leeu-House-2.JPGI fell in love with the hotel dining area – both inside and out – at first sight,  with its black and white tiled floor and soaring glass conservatory-feel. The other guests dining there were Americans – one couple from North Carolina and the other family party from further north up the coast. As they communicated and discussed the state of the Western Cape roads (good) and Chapmans Peak drive (stupendous) I dithered between a first course of local smoked salmon with brown bread, capers and lemon crème fraîche or  a Waldorf salad. The former won, and I went on to a delectable mushroom risotto seasoned with three-year-aged Parmesan. Other main courses included local fish, chips, peas and tartar sauce, rigatoni topped with Toulouse sausage and tomato ragout or beef and mushroom ragout with roasted carrot mash. As with the savoury courses, there is a choice of four desserts, one being a savoury option of local artisanal cheese and preserves. All in all, delicious cuisine that doesn’t try to be too grand or  gourmet, looks good and tastes even better.

This opinion was confirmed next morning when pondering on the two breakfast menus:  – One was available from the buffet – from croissants and pastries through berries and fruits to double thick yoghurt and honey-roasted nuts. Healthy items like oat granola bars and caramelised coconut were alongside muesli and tea-dried fruits while carnivores could protein-pack with the local charcuterie selection.

The a la carte choices include duck egg Benedict, folded omelettes with Swiss Gruyere and foraged mushrooms and smoked salmon with truffled scrambled eggs. Traditionalists and Scots can start the day with oats, malted sugar and single malt whisky or an old-fashioned pork sausage sandwich and brown sauce, which, I think, may hark back to the chef’s roots…

The previous evening I had walked next door to to visit Le Quartier Francais’s new renovated bar and lounge, which is now a vibrant, contemporary venue, as up to date as tomorrow’s weather. The walls are lined with a rough weave fabric, the roundback chairs sport blue suede upholstery and the long, long bar is fronted with a row of high stools dressed in blue and white. The lighting is dim, but its easy to enjoy the giant prints on some walls of everyday items like a pair of scissors and a bunch of screws. There’s also a cosy side room with nests of sofas for intimate fireside gatherings. Soft background jazz is teamed with black and white photos of the artistes, whether Jozi-style or New Orleans, I am not sure.

Everywhere at these exceptional venues now owned by Mr BAS Singh, the service is, as expected, swift and efficient. But it is also charming, friendly and concerned, with both the genial GM (who doubles up managing both Leeu House and LQF) and the receptionists and restaurant staff coming across as wanting to do their very best to make you happy. In this, they certainly succeeded.

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Posted by on in Events

The time is ripe, the weather is great, and food and wine impressive! The enchanting village of McGregor is combining Heritage Day celebrations  with their annual Food and Wine festival, an irresistible combo  for a host of good reasons..

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McGregor holds an annual one-day Food and Wine fest which is relaxed, enjoyable, and caters to all tastes. As usual, this village perched on the edge of the Little Karoo,  showcases the region's wines, and our cooks and restaurateurs, chefs and caterers present a feast of country fare which ranges from gourmet to local, seasonal to stylish. Expect some truly heritage tastes as well.

Winemakers and cellar owners will be on hand to tell you about their ranges, which, with 11 producers taking part, will offer a diverse and pleasing selection. McGregor valley has come of age, wine-wise, and visitors can sample easy-drinking reds, whites and pinks, some middle-of-the-road ranges and move on to some really fine labels, including the valley's first organic sauvignon blanc, a garagiste's bone dry bubbly and impressive shiraz, cab franc and cab franc rose that are both outstanding, a pinot noir that's making waves far beyond the village and more, much, much more... 

Relax to the appealing sounds of our local Langeberg steel band and the village brass band, then wander around the village to admire the mid-Victorian streetscapes that have survived more than a century. Take a brochure from Tourism to find out more about how this magical village was founded, and pause at the Heritage Society table to uncover the valley's  past.

Make time to head to the hills and hike around our Krans Nature Reserve, dressed in its spring flowers  or the bigger Vrojlikheid reserve. Bikers have wonderful trails to explore on the perimeter and back in the village, there is an outstanding pottery, a few art galleries, and some great places to chill, meet other pub-goers and enjoy a light or filling meal.

Of course you should be making a weekend of this excursion, so contact the McGregor tourism office for booking accommodation or more festival info.

The festival runs from 10am to 6pm on Saturday September 24 and tickets cost R80 which includes a tasting glass and tastings from all the cellars. Head to the Dutch Reformed church in the village centre to find the festival - see the photograph above.

Email info@tourismmcgregor.co.za or call 023 625 1954. See you there!

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Posted by on in Restaurants

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Why it’s taken me so long to visit this comparatively new Franschhoek estate, established in 2005, I cannot say, but I am glad that I now know more about this inviting former farmstead,  gutted inside to produce interleading spacious areas sheltering under a corrugated iron roof that has seen better days – and is proud of its heritage!

When I arrived midmorning and midweek on a perfect spring day I was  welcomed loudly by a rooster perched on the terrace. No other cars in the parking area, lined by a fragrant lemon orchard, but inside staff were bustling about setting up a food and wine shoot, while outside at the back, the chef seemed to be holding a class with a bunch of staff members.

I explored happily on my own, taking in the spacious indoor restaurant, casual seating area, furnished with plenty of blonde wood and a deli with shelves lined with produce, pates and pickles, jams and more.

I asked for a menu, was given one to take away, and offered a wine tasting, which I declined, as   a long chenin celebration llay ahead of me. The restaurant, named The Kitchen at Maison is headed by chef Arno Janse van Rensburg, who looks very fierce in his photographs, but presents an interesting menu that lists dishes by their ingredients – such as Beetroot, mushroom, turmeric, ginger, tuna and  another of Baby potatoes, nettle, chicken skin and egg yolk. He clearly is into fermenting and pickling, and includes trendy ingredients like kombucha with a dish of suckling pig, parsnip, cashew nut and celeriac. Adventurous palates are required for some of his creations, which range in price from R85 to R145 with a single steak – Angus prime rib – at an eye-watering R450.

Cheese and charcuterie plates make other options and a quartet of desserts, at R75 each, include unexpected combos like dark chocolate, quinoa, citrus, yoghurt and almond.

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I had received the 2014 Maison chardonnay with its trendy label of minimal wording and lots of white space. Maison boasts less than one ha of 11- year -old chardonnay vines, and viticulturist-cum-winemaker Antwan Bondesio has made good use of them in this wine, producing a wooded chard that is elegant, and almost frisky, in spite of its untrendy 14,5% alcohol levels. These are not apparent, however, as the citrus flavours prevail along with whiffs of butterscotch. An enjoyable summer chard, medium-bodied, with subtle oak, that will make an easy-going companion to a variety of salad fare, seafood and poultry, selling at R180.

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