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With chenin blanc now firmly established as the cultivar that not only celebrates more than 350 years of Cape history and not only occupies more SA vineyard area than any other white varietal, but that produces   top chenin blancs that are being recognised across the globe as the best on the planet. Confirmation of this can be seen in the rave reviews and points awarded to our chenin blancs from acknowledged experts – recently UK guru Tim Atkin MW awarded the trio of 2016 Mulderbosch Single Vineyard chenins scores of 96 (Block A), 95 (Block W) and 93 (Block S2) respectively in his 2017 Special Report on South African wines.

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While the Swartland has happily claimed to be home to the finest chenin terroir, Stellenbosch has quietly been upping its chenin blanc production to prove that this pioneer region can – and does – produce exceptional chenin blancs.  The Mulderbosch trio is a good example, each chenin offering a distinct expression of place, with Block A  - sourced from the southern slopes of the Bottelary Hills -  perhaps the friskiest, with exotic fruit aromas followed by dry but concentrated fruit on the palate.

  Vineyard Block S2, whose grapes  came from the northern slopes of the Bottelary Hills, is more complex, its  golden hue offering hints of the power ahead. Dry and savoury, the nose of caramel is as rich as the flavours that follow, and  there’s a saline hint in the mouthfeel and long finish. A connoisseur chenin to savour now or squirrel away for a future occasion.

Block W also presents a hue of deep gold and is probably the most complex chenin of the three. The vineyard that produced these grapes is sited in granite close to False Bay. 

A wealth of fynbos and herby aromas leads to citrus and flint on the palate in a rich,  powerful but well-balanced wine.

All the vines are more than 30 years old, and the fruits of all three were harvested in the same way, being  whole- bunch pressed. Used 225litre French oak was chosen for fermentation and maturation.

These limited editions make wonderful festive gifts for Christmas and fine partners for New Year al fresco fare.  They are also likely to produce yet more SA chenin fans who will  sing the praises of our superb chenin blancs. The recommended retail price is R250 each.

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A  welcome newcomer was released at Morgenster estate last month when Giulio Bertrand and his team presented  the maiden Vespri 2017 to media and friends at his hillside tasting pavilion.

The first white in his Italian opera-themed collection, Vespri is produced from Vermentino grapes, a Sardinian cultivar that is starting to make an appearance at the Cape, although Morgenster’s vineyard is still in its infancy.

Named for  Verdi’s opera VespriSiciliani , the new addition is bright lemon in hue  in spite of its youth. It is fresh and dry with notes of flint to balance stone fruit flavours on the palate, moderate alcohol levels reflecting current tastes, Above all this, like nearly all Italian labels, is a wine made for food, to complement summer fare of seafood, salads and antipasti. It is the ideal partner to festive tables of al fresco Mediterranean dishes, lingered over at long tables in deep shade.

Vespri is a lightweight companion to Tosca, Nabucco and Caruso, rounding off the two reds – former of Sangiovese with Bordeaux blends and with Nabucco starring  Nebbiolo  - along with Caruso, a rosé of Sangiovese. Now there is  a quartet that can elevate every culinary occasion.

Vespri costs R120 from the farm and their online shop http://morgenster.co.za/ and is also available from selected  retailers.

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  • A festive season promotion featuring a wine range with a quirky name and a reputation that stretches across three continents. The first Fat Bastard wine originated as an experimental chardonnay and was produced by two friends, UK Guy Anderson and French winemaker Thierry Boudinaud.  Delighted with their creation  - which had been left on the lees for far longer than normal – and that  they had produced a big, fat, full-bodied wine, which led one of them to exclaim  “Well now that’s a fat bastard.” The name stuck, and they went on to make a whole range of rich, round, food-friendly wines that have found favour on both sides of the Atlantic.

Back  in SA they are produced by Robertson Winery, and the range offers a sauvignon blanc, chardonnay, pinot noir rose,  merlot, pinotage, shiraz and cabernet. Whites cost around R70, reds sell at R110 and all are widely available.

Winelovers across South Africa can be in with a chance to win a fabulous getaway to a luxurious destination in the spectacular Blyde River Canyon in Mpumalanga. Take your partner and escape to umVangati House for three nights on a #LiveLarge trip.

To be in line to win, you need to buy a bottle of Fat Bastard wine before the year ends. See  details below, and good luck...

To enter, buy any bottle of Fat Bastard wine with a promotional necktag, from any outlet in SA., before December 31, and follow the instructions on the necktag. OR Enter online before December 23 , go to http://www.fatbastardwine.co.za/pages/greencanyoncomp.php

 

 

 

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The two titles reviewed here are  publications that will delight many readers, more particularly armchair historians, battlefield enthusiasts, Overberg lovers and travellers who like researching their holiday destinations both before and after their visits.

 

 

Guide to Sieges of South Africa by Nicki von der heyde. Published by Struik, 2017.

 

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Not only is this the perfect pocketbook for the legions of battlefiedl buffs who plan their trips around battlefields of Southern Africa, but it's written with such professional enthusiasm that it will surely draw new supporters to the fascinating  stories of the sieges that accompanied wars over two centuries.

This guide is a companion volume to van der Heyde's Field Gjuide to the Battlefields of South Africa which proved a highly successful publication. This specialist guide presents detailed descriptions of 17 sieges that occurred during the Cape Frontier, Anglo-Zulu, Basotho and Anglo-Boer wars. 

Some are well-known to most South Africans - such as the sieges of Lydenburg, Mafeking, Kimberley and Ladysmith. Others less so - I didn't know that Durban had been besieged in 1842 nor had I read about those at Mount Moorosi in what was then Basutoland or the sieges of Fort Cox and Fort Armstrong in the Eastern Cape.

As public fascination with sieges continues, it's good to have a well-qualified historian who is also a woman in the male-dominated battlefield-guiding fraternity turn to writing on her subject. Not only does she present a very readable text, but includes personal stories of heroism and heartbreak that are part of every battle and siege. As the writer points out, with sieges civilians were freqently involved, and some of them kept diaries recording their hardships and personal experiences both tragic and humorous. 

 The pages are brought to even greater life by maps, timelines, many old and some new  photographs that accompany human interest stories gleaned from diaries and letters and records of the time. 

The detailed and professional index compiled by Emsie du Plessis adds considerably to the book's usefulness as a reference tool.

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HERMANUS by Beth Hunt. Published by Struik Travel & Heritage, 2017.

 

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With a subtitle listing Whales, Wine, Fynbos and Art, readers get an immediate picture of what to expect in this appealing hardback with its front and back cover photographs of the town's iconic old harbour.

As one expects in a publication like this, the gallery of fine photographs by Johann and Kobus Kruger play a major role in illustrating both the natural and manmade beauty of the town and surroundings, its people and many attractions.

Chapters on tourist drawcards like whales and sharks are given much space, as is the art scene which thrives there in  all its diversity.The cliff path, and the equally famous Fernkloof Nature reserve and other sources of floral wealth are featured,

 as is the equally lovely Hemel-en-Aarde valley which not only stirs the aesthetic senses but also offer fine New World wines from a number of farms that form one of the most bewitching wine routes in the Cape - and the world.

The fascination of the the past is well-captured taking us back to the time when the Khoi met the first Dutch settlers and a teacher and shepherd made the clifftops near a freshwater spring the site of his summer camps for his sheep. Hermanus Pieters died  in 1837 and was destined to lend his name to the site which became known as Hermanuspietersfontein.

The stories of the shipwrecks on the coast, of the famous long-established hotels  also make fascinating reading, as does the lure of game-fishing. Current tales take in more recent developments, around new suburbs that have sprung up and new communities settled there, adding to the enormous diversity that makes the town and surrounds so attractive to both permanent residents and holiday visitors. 

 

Well-researched and written this is a charming and informative title for both locals, visitors and those planning to make their way to the whale capital of the world.

 

 

 

 

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 A GRAND INTERACTIVE CHAMPAGNE TREE FROM MOET & CHANDON

 

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With the countdown to Christmas under way, the Mother City is hosting a grand Champagne Tree, made entirely from recycled Moët & Chandon champagne bottles, which is also  interactive. Set against the backdrop of the Silo district at the V&A Waterfront, the impressive 10-metre tree, made from over 1 500 recycled bottles collected from all over South Africa,  will be topped with a spinning gold Moët & Chandon crown and decorated with more than 15,300 LED lights, in 26 concentric rows.

 

Anyone within reach can join the fun at the  tree lighting ceremony on  7th December  starting at 19h30. In another first for South Africa, visitors will be able to send messages to friends and family which will appear as scrolling notes on a magnificent light ribbon wrapped around the tree. Tweets and Instagram captions which include the hashtag #moetmomentcapetown will show in real-time and, when visitors engage on social media using the#moetmomentcapetown followed by the popping champagne bottle emoji, the Moët & Chandon crown at the top of the tree will spin!

With a bottle of its champagne opened every second around the globe, Moët & Chandon knows that every second is an experience, and every experience is a #moetmoment to live now.!

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GROOTE POST’S

CHRISTMAS MARKET ON SUNDAY 17THDECEMBER

 

As always, the terrace alongside the Groote Post Cellar will be a hive of activity, brimming with delicious and beautiful country offerings, while visitors relaxi in the shade under the trees in front of Hilda’s Kitchen  tucking into their delicious eats from the market. And the market will be a perfect playground for children who love the rolling lawns, playground, horse-riding, tractor rides and face painting, to name a few of the activities on offer.

 

Expect ‘ALL THINGS CHRISTMAS’ at Groote Post’s December Market - with decorations and gifts and Father Christmas entertaining the children.

 

Groote Post’s award-winning restaurant, Hilda’s Kitchen, will be open as usual, but please note that booking is essential.Although pets are most welcome – all dogs must be on a leash at-all-times. The market takes place from 10am to 3pm

 

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Eikendal Vineyards adds a Christmas and wine pairing to the options at the estate

 

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It’s the Festive Season andEikendal Vineyards is bringing the flavours of Christmas to their Tasting Centre with a delicious  Christmas & Wine Pairing.

Expect a truly German  Lebkuchen, with its nuances of honey, spices and cloves, covered in a thin layer of icing with the Pinotage 2016, which adds flavours of red and black cherries. The Charisma 2016, a blend of Shiraz, Petit Verdot and Sangiovese, and the Mince Pie envelope  offers a rich and sensory tastte explosion.the bold and juicy Cabernet Sauvignon 2015 steps up to join a slice traditional, South African Christmas cake, straight from Granny’s recipe book.   

 

The exclusive Eikendal Christmas & Wine Pairing, which costs R100 per person, will keep visitors in the holiday spirit from 1 to 31 December, Tuesdays to Sundays between 10:00 and 16:30.To book for this decadent indulgence or for any queries relating to the Eikendal Experience, contact Chantal-Lee at 021 855 1422 or send an email toinfo@eikendal.co.za.

 

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CONGRATS TO BOTH OF THEM

 

The winners of the 2017 Diners Club Winemaker and Young Winemaker of the Year Awards were announced at a black-tie gala dinner at La Residence Hotel in Franschhoek on  25 November,.

 

Christiaan Groenewald (Eagle’s Cliff Wines) and Wade Roger-Lund(Jordan Estate) claiming top honours respectively.

 

Christiaan Groenewald, delighted the judges with his Eagle’s Cliff Pinotage 2017. This is the second time he has been honoured with this distinguished accolade, having won Winemaker of the Year in 2013 for his ArendskloofVoetsporeTannat Syrah 2011 (Non-Bordeaux Red Blends category). Christiaan is one of only five winemakers to have won this award twice.

 

The 2017 Diners Club Young Winemaker of the Year, Wade Roger-Lund, received his award for the Jordan Blanc de Blancs Méthode Cap Classique 2015 (White Wines category).

 

The winning Winemaker receives R50 000 while the Young Winemaker, R25 000.  Both winemakers get two return businessclass tickets on Delta Airlines to any wine producing region in the USA.

 

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A NEW AND RUSTIC COUNTRY EATERY IN THE ELGIN VALLEY

 

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  Rojaal IS  an authentic country eatery housed in a former flower-packing shed overlooking one of the  region’s many valleys, Rojaal (the Afrikaans word for Royal) was established just over a year ago by enterprising apple farmer Arno Reuvers. It boasts a heritage decor and offers soul-stirring views from its grassy ridge. Its interior is homely with farmhouse furniture and crockery completing the scene. The verandah offers al fresco seating, overlooking the childrens playgournd and a vista that stretches to distant mountains.

 

. In her tiny kitchen, chef Orscilla Hitchcock  applies her loving touch to ingredients to create timeless country classics.  Originally from Prince Albert, she completed her studies at Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT) Hotel School in Granger Bay, Cape Town, before joining the Volkskombuis in Stellenbosch. Her path then led her to Leeuwenhof, where she headed the kitchen team. 

                                                                                                                 

Rojaal is open from Wednesday to Sunday from 8am to 5pm.                                                                                                                                                                   Turn off the N2 at the Viljoenshoop Road, just after the Peregrine Farm Stall and keep left for 4km For enquiries, call 021 204 1085 or email bestuurder@rojaal.co.za and chef@rojaal.co.za.

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There are many winelovers who would not think of tucking into a festive feast of beef fillet, leg of lamb of a haunch of venison without a bottle or two of excellent Cape cabernet sauvignon. Their source of origin is likely to be Stellenbosch or Paarl, both regions which have proven over decades to be home to the terroir required to produce acclaimed cabs.  Here’s news of three champions, each one of whom will grace tables set for holiday fare, from gourmet braais to trad and trendy menus for Christmas and the New Year that follows.

 

NEDERBURG II CENTURIES CABERNET SAUVIGNON 2013

 

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Ladies first, so take a bow Andrea Freeborough, cellarmaster at Nederburg, who is celebrating the fact that the 2013 Nederburg Cabernet Sauvignon has been judged the best cab at the IWSC 2017 competition. It triumphed against others from several countries, scooping the Warren Winiarski Trophy, following on a similar victory last year when its companion cab, the Nederburg Private Bin R163 cab collected the trophy for best cabernet at the show.

This year’s winner, part of the II Centuries range, was made from low- yielding dryland Paarl vineyards, and spent 30 months in new, second and third-fill oak. It is a compelling cab, rich yet fresh, with ripe tannins and the characteristic cabernet flavours of dark berries and plums, with notes of cassis and aromatic wood. It packs an alcoholic punch at 15% and in something of a hat trick, its successor, the 2014 vintage, is Platter’s Red Wine of the Year in its just-released 2018 guide.

My 2013 sample was packaged to impress in a leather banded black velvet-lined case, which must have added considerably to the costs. It makes a fine gift for any and every occasion.

 

LE RICHE 2014 CABERNET SAUVIGNON AND 2014 CABERNET SAUVIGNON RESERVE

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There can be very few people in the wine world who do not share Etienne le Riche’s well-deserved reputation as 'king of South African cabernet' although as modest as he is, he would not flaunt that informal title. But he does say with conviction that Stellenbosch is Cabernet country, and has spent more than three decades proving this statement through a succession of brilliant vintages. The Le Riche cabs have now officially come of age as its 21 years since Etienne went on his own, setting up his cellar in the Jonkershoek valley and sourcing the best grapes for his wine across the region.

The maiden vintage in 1997 was voted five stars in the Platter guide and this was followed by a succession of acclaimed cabs. His son grew up at his side, went on to study viti- and viniculture and joined his father as winemaker in 2010. Today Etienne continues to be the driving force behind the winery, while Christo adds a modern touch while maintaining the philosophy of quality, consistency and elegance.

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In 2013 the family built a new winery on the lower slopes of the Helderberg but grapes are still sourced from Stellenbosch growers in different microclimates.  

I was unable to attend the Le Riche family’s recent vertical tasting of their cabernet, but have been  privileged to sample the  two 2014 vintages, the flagship Reserve and the  cabernet sauvignon that's the backbone of the range.

The Reserve is, as its name implies, the wine that embodies the best that can be made, where no effort or cost is spared to ensure quality that is  made to age. The 2014 spent 22 months in French oak, 62% of it new, and presents an impressive  classic cab, with prominent  freshness as wafts of cedarwood and blackcurrant are repeated as flavours, alongside juiciness , lively tannins, and a long finish. Already rich and elegant, but will continue to improve for up to a decade, its an aristocrat whose qualities are reflected in  retail prices of around R550.

The Cabernet 2014 does not suffer by comparison, as it's a hugely enjoyable wine that delivers everything cabernet fans look for: berry and plum aromas dominate, but there’s a hint of vanilla and cedarwood. The tannins are smooth and nicely balance the juicy fruit and agreeable freshness which adds up to pleasure that is also so approachable: this style adds appeal to a wider market who may have found earlier Le Riche cabs on the austere side.  Like the Reserve, alcohol levels are kept at 14%  and consumers can expect to pay between R210 and R250 in stores countrywide. Both wines will elevate main courses of beef, lamb, meaty fish and game bird dishes to memorable celebrations.

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From Stellenbosch, McGregor and Elgin, three delightful examples that express diverse regionality in appealing fashion and reviewed below in alphabetical order.

 

Bellevue Sauvignon Blanc 2017 

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The Morkel family have been making wine at Bellevue on the Bottelary road for than 150 years and their experience is clearly evident in this delicious single vineyard sauvignon blanc that also offers exceptional value.  The 19-year-old vineyard, dubbed Dodo, yields grapes to result in a wine that presents a bouquet of tropical flavours with autumn  fruit to follow on the palate. The wine is agreeably frisky, but there is a long finish where its fine balance is discernible.  The over-used phrase summer in a glass is really applicable here. Expect to pay R60 from the cellar door .

 

Lords Sauvignon Blanc 2017

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Lords wines just go on getting better and better. The new vintage sauvignon blanc is a case in point – it is  a moreish wine whatever your preference when it comes to this cultivar. This is because there is a good balance between fruity tropical flavours and crisp green ones, captured in a characterful wine that is tangy and refreshing with a hint of minerality. It made it into the Top 20 in this years Sauvignon Blanc contest and sells for R95 from the charming mountainside cellar in the McGregor highlands.

 

Paul Cluver Sauvignon Blanc

 

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It is not often that one finds a sauvignon blanc that improves with time after being opened. But this is what I found with this elegant offering from Elgin, it seemed to acquire more fruit allied to an agreeable richness  after 24 hours, while crisp verdancy was predominant on first unscrewing the cap. The Elgin character – which can be on the restrained and severe side is contained here to provide a fine balance to fruit, while the Semillon addition adds  creamy complexity. Whether as an aperitif or partner to summer fare, a winner both ways. It costs R90 ex-cellar.

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 THE THIRD FNB EASTERN CAPE WINE SHOW

 

The  FNB Eastern Cape Wine Show in Port Elizabeth takes place  at The Boardwalk in Summerstrand on Thursday 23 and Friday 24 November.  Book your date-night to taste a choice selection from the Cape’s best -  from scintillating sparklings and crisp whites to voluptuous reds, Cape Ports and fine brandies.  Around 40 exhibitors will be on show, several of which are already 2017 award winners

Wine lovers can plan their tasting experience  by visiting  www.easterncapewineshow-pe.co.za for a full list of exhibitors and wines in the lead-up to the showthe FNB Eastern Cape Wine Show is a not-to-be-missed opportunity to shop for wine favourites at the Shop@Show stand, facilitated by local retailer Preston’s. 

                                                                                                                                                                                    DaDates:      Thursday 23 and Friday 24 November 2017

Venue:       Tsitsikamma Rooms, The Boardwalk, Beach Road, Summerstrand

Time:         18h00 -21h00

Ticket Prices:  R170 per night (includes unlimited tastings, wine tasting glass and wine show guide). 

Refreshments: Light meals will be on sale in the wine hall.

Queries: 011 482 5936/5/4

Tickets: Ticket sales are open and can be purchased at one of options

  • Online www.computicket.com
  • Money Market counters in Shoprite Checkers stores
  • At the door (subject to availability)

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Fruit pickings and leisurely lunches at De Krans this summer

From November to March De Krans Cellar in Calitzdorp invites visitors to join in a farm favourite of  seasonal fruit picking.

From 22 November - 3 December  Bulida Apricots will be available to pick at R6.50 per kg. If you prefer peaches best you diarise 16 to 27 December when the Oom Sarel Cling Peaches will be ready for perfect pickings at R8.00 per kg. End off the  season by picking Hanepoot Grapes from 7 February to 4 March 2018 at R7.50 per kg. These dates are weather dependent, and may change slightly at short notice. The perfect family outing De Krans will be open seven days a week from 9am until 4pm for the picking of these fruits, with the exception of Christmas Day.

For more information contact the farm on 044 213 3314, or email at dekrans@mweb.co.za.

 

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 Stellenbosch Hills adds bacon to the biltong pairings.

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Stellenbosch Hills set tongues a-wagging in 2005 when it paired wines with that quintessential South African snack, biltong and droëwors. Now, bacon is also offered but only  for December and January, That means a single ticket of only R65 per person gets you not only the traditional six awesome portions, but a magnificent seventh too! 

The new addition to the food and wine spread offers Bacon “biltong” barbeque spiced and paired with Stellenbosch Hills Chenin Blanc.

The other pairings are: 

Springbok Biltong & Stellenbosch Hills 1707 Reserve White: a perfect balance between lean, dry gaminess and the wine’s sumptuous citrus and buttered toast flavours;

Moist Beef Biltong & Stellenbosch Hills Polkadraai Pinotage/Merlot: succulent complexity matched with sweeter notes of the premier red blend;

Ostrich Droëwors & Stellenbosch Hills Merlot: milder game meat perfectly complemented by the plummy, ripe fruit flavours of a well-rounded companion;

Smoked Beef Biltong & Stellenbosch Hills Shiraz: A unique oak-smoked and cured biltong, gently spiced connect seamlessly with smoky flavours of a wine that exhibits a hint of dark chocolate;

Kudu Droëwors & Stellenbosch Hills Cabernet Sauvignon: Subtle yet rich game flavours perfect match for silky tannin and notes of ripe black fruit; and,

Traditional Beef Droëwors & Stellenbosch Hills 1707 Reserve Red: Exotic zest of roasted coriander offsets the wine’s clean spice and ripe tannin.

Book  by sending an email to info@stellenbosch-hills.co.za or call 021 881 3828.

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A maiden bubbly and a pair of lightly sparkling sippers allow summer to be celebrated with effervescence at prices to please.

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Stellenbosch Hills has added a lively bubbly to its popular Polkadraai range:- Their Sauvignon Blanc Sparkling Brut 2017, priced at just R60, is dry, with plenty of zing, offering an easy-drinking sparkler for brunch, lunch and sundown gatherings. Just 12,5% alcohol levels will add to its appeal for many, while it’s good to remember that Stellelnbosch Hills gives a percentage of profits from every bottle from the Polkadraai range to the Polka Kid Community Project, a fund that helps provide teaching aids to the Vlottenburg Primary School. And, consumers can beneft by buying a six-bottle case of Polkadraai Brut (or any other wine in this range) on a Friday, when they will pay for only five.

From Stellenbosch to Robertson where the ever-innovative Robertson Winery has released the 2016 vintages of their  lightly sparkling summer sippers:    a Sauvignon Blanc and a Pinot Noir Rosé, both captured in attractive skittle-shaped  bottles starring colour-coded screwcaps, complete with polka dots.

Senior winelovers will recall that affordable petillant whites from Paarl were all the rage among young budget-conscious party-goers, who – having been to Mozambique and enjoyed Portuguese “green” wine – wanted something similar back home.

The sauvignon is crisp and dry, the rose hints at berry and watermelon flavours. Both the white and the pink sparklers are low in alcohol – 10% and 9% respectively and both are priced at around R55.

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Just a fortnight to go before the finalists in this year’s Diners Club Winemaker and Young Winemaker of the Year get to know who made it to the top . Nail-biting times for them and their cellars, while usually these announcements signal the end of annual competitions and awards and the start of the silly season.

Winemaker of the Year Finalists: Category - Pinotage

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  • André Scriven - Rooiberg Pinotage Reserve 2016
  • Christiaan Groenewald - New Cape Wines - Arendskloof Pinotage 2015 and Eagles Cliff Pinotage 2017
  • Clayton Reabow - Môreson Widowmaker Pinotage 2015
  • De Wet Viljoen - Neethlingshof Pinotage 2016
  • Niël Groenewald - Bellingham Homestead Pinotage 2016

Young Winemaker of the Year Finalists: Category - White Wines

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  • Charl Schoeman - Simonsig Roussanne 2016 and Roussanne Marsanne 2016
  • Murray Barlow - Rustenberg Stellenbosch Chardonnay 2016
  • Philip Viljoen - Bon Courage Chardonnay Unwooded 2017 and Noble Late Harvest 2016 (Weisser Riesling/Gewürztraminer)
  • Wade Roger-Lund - Jordan Blanc de Blancs Méthode Cap Classique 2015

The winners of both titles will be announced at a gala dinner at La Residence Hotel in Franschhoek on 25 November . The winning Winemaker receives R50 000 and the Young Winemaker R25 000. Both winners also receive two return tickets on Delta Airlines to any wine producing region in the USA.

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Welmoed is a venerable label, and one of several brands and ranges produced by Stellenbosch Vineyards, a global wine group that exports around 80% of its production, mostly to the Netherlands. They are based on the 17th century Welmoed farm outside Stellebnosch and the recently released range is called the Heritage Selection, which is in keeping with a farm dating back to 1690.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Welmoed-Sauvignon-Blanc-2017.jpgThe wines, all selling at R50 from cellar door, include a sauvignon blanc, cab,  chenin, chardonnay, merlot, shiraz, pinotage and rosé. This re-branding is clearly aimed at the consumer who enjoys easy-drinking wines at affordable prices. The two I sampled – sauvignon blanc 2017  and cabernet sauvignon 2016 fit this description, with the former presenting a well-balanced mix of green and gooseberry flavours with a fresh zing, moderate alcohol levels of 13,5%. The cabernet sauvignon should please legions of fans who enjoy reds that display berry flavours, a touch of oak and are full-bodied, but stay with a moderate 13,% alcohol level.

The Heritage Selection complements the other upmarket brands like the Credo Limited Releases and Stellenbosch Vineyard’s Flagship wines.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Welmoed-Cabernet-Sauvignon-2016.jpgI like the story of how Welmoed got its name: the farm, originally granted to Simon van der Stel, was subsequently inherited by one Jacobus van der Heyden who was one of the farmers who rebelled against the infamous governor Willem van der Stel. He was imprisoned, later released in ill-health whereupon the local community exclaimed "Deze vent heft wel moed”  iow this chap does have courage...

A toast to Jacobus is in order!

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It’s still easy to get off the beaten track in the Robertson valley, and, as sophistication threatens to change the nature of some farms on this wine route, the country cellars on roads less travelled gain in appeal.

One such is Windfall, a truly rustic farm that maintains its simple boutique origins even as winemaker Kobus van der Merwe adds new wines to the range  - a maiden Cap Classique will soon join the others.

When I first visited the farm off the Agterkliphoogte road the tasting centre had just been completed. Today there are self-catering cottages, lemon groves along with 63ha of red and white cultivars. The farm's six-year-old potstill brandy, named The Hunter, produced from Chenin Blanc, is attracting considerable praise.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Windfall-Chenin-Blanc-Bottleshot_20171026-141720_1.jpgThe recently released 2017 Chenin Blanc, a fresh and easy-drinking charmer,  offers a range of stone fruit and citrus flavours. It's an appealing partner to casual al fresco fare with  pleasing alcohol levels kept to 12,5%. It sells for R72, which is also the price of the Windfall Grenache Rosé, an off-dry pink presenting melon and berry notes which will find many a fan, and with a moderate alcohol count of just 11,5%.

 Although I have not tasted either, I noticed that Windfall notched up two golds at the 2017 Michelangelo Awards, for their 2015 Cabernet and 2014 Shiraz,  Visitors wanting to sample this boutique collection need to make an appointment before heading to the cellar.

The farm, originally called Spes Bona, was in the Lourens family until cricketing legend Eddie Barlow bought it and changed the name as he watched mists rollling down the mountains that surround the valley. Of course the name also points to unexpected good fortune, a legacy that the present owners, the Alexander family, are busily building on.

To finish on a cricketing note, the owners, winemakers and team at Windfall are on a good wicket, and one that is sure to keep getting better.

See www.windfallwine.co.za for more info.

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Raise your glasses to the short-lived Battle of Muizenberg 222 years ago

The incredible history of Steenberg’s first owner has been well documented (and nicely embroidered) over the centuries. But as the first and feisty woman owner of this early mountainside farm, Catharina certainly made her mark as she worked her way through several husbands while running a farm that also saw travellers overnighting there before continuing to Simons Bay the following day.

More than a century later, other occupants of that old farm stood on that stony mountainside gazing down toward the Indian Ocean lapping at the False Bay beach. This time, there was a war on, known as the Battle of Muizenberg. It was August, 1795.

Former friends, now foes, Holland, who controlled the Cape through the Dutch East India Company no longer allowed Britain access to the Cape, a position that the British East India Company could not tolerate as it was an essential point of supplies in the long journey to the East. A fleet of nine Royal Navy ships, which included two warships, Ruby and Stately and a frigate, Sphynx among them, sailed forth, enabling the British to take control of Simons Town in mid June. The Dutch retreated to their seaside Muizenberg fort, with just 300 men. On August 7 the British sent two battalions to Muizenberg supported by three saips at sea, including Stately. It was all over by 2pm when the Dutch retreat to Zandvlei and the first British Occupation of the Cape was a reality.

I don’t know whose idea it was to honour three of the tall  ships which took part in this short- lived skirmish, but not only is it a brainwave to mark an historic day in the Southern Peninsula chronicles, but wines with a story to tell increase their appeal, and so it is with this maiden trio of enjoyment.

Lift a glass to Ruby, a 2017 rosé with class, made up of just more than half syrah

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and the rest cinsaut, a wine that sings of summer days and long, warm nights. It’s dry, but there’s ample fruit, berries vying for attention with watermelon and a little spice, hints of citrus, an aperitif that will also pair happily with picnics, salads and fruity desserts. Moderate alcohol levels of 12,5% and already sporting its first award, a Double Gold from Rosé Rocks. Selling for R86 at the cellar door

Sphynx 2017 is a charming chardonnay, my favourite of the three, produced from Robertson valley grapes that have been carefully handled to present an elegant

 

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wine, whose stay in oak has added depth and structure without any obvious wood.  Characteristic citrus, caramel and peach, with quince adding a Med flavour. It’s fresh and sprightly, alcohol held at 13,5%, a wine for toasting, for partnering with seafood, poultry and serious salads. It costs R135 at the farm.

The third tall ship is Stately, well depicted here as a 2015 cab-led blend with 37% shiraz making the remainder, a dense wine with elegant smooth texture, both

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accessible and ready to drink. There is a gamut of flavours to identify from olives and berries, black pepper to wafts of licorice. Moderate alcohol levels add to its appeal, and this is the only wine closed with cork. It sells for  R135, and is a versatile red that will adapt to many an occasion.

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SEASON OF SAUVIGNON SETS DURBANVILLE A-TINGLE!

 

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A bakers dozen of inviting farms makes up the Durbanville Wine Valley, a group that is popular both collectively and individually. The annual Season of Sauvignon takes place over the weekend of October 28 -29, and is a celebration that needs little publicity, as its hugely popular with both locals and visitors. This year 11 farms are taking part, offering a variety of festivities, pouring their sauvignons and offering entertainment and good food to boot.

 

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See www.durbanvillewine.co.za for the detailed programme and contemplate your chosen itinerary. Book your festival tickets via www.webtickets.co.za.

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FRANSCHHOEKS BUBBLY FEST MARKS THE START OF THE FESTIVE SEASON.

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The Magic of Bubbles, the annual Cap Classique and Champagne Festival takes place on December 2 and 3, and guests are asked to dress to impress in black and white. As in previous years the grand marquee will be pitched at the Huguenot Monument, and the local and imported bubblies will be accompanied by stylish fare from local restaurants.

Tickets cost R375 a head, and include tasting glass and coupons. Children under 18 enter free of charge. Book through www.webtickets.co.za. Those paying with Mastercard receive a 10% discount on ticket prices and purchases.

 

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Eikendal Vineyards swirls Cheesecake & Wine Pairings

 

 

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This popular Stellenbosch destination always pops up with a new way to pair their fine wines with tasty bites. This summer it's cheesecake and wine pairings, where the cellar’s crisp sauvignon blanc is matched to lemon cheesecake, the berry cheesecake with their sauvignon blanc/chardonnay blend and their Janina unwooded chardonnay is partnered with salted caramel cheesecake.

The Eikendal Cheesecake & Wine Pairing Experience costs R80 per person and will be swirling the senses from October 2017 until April 2018, Tuesdays to Sundays between 10:00 and 16:30. To book contact Chantal-Lee at 021 855 1422 or send an email toinfo@eikendal.co.za.

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Charles Withington - seen here with Gypsy -  is renowned both as a successful négociant and a charming connoisseur in the Cape wine world . He is based in Darling where he presides over his inviting wine boutique The Darling Wine Shop, and he is passionate about the district of Darling as a source of good grapes and fine wine that reflects the terroir.

“A Darling Wine” reads the back label below the name Roan Ranger. This 2015 blend encompasses all that I could ask for in a red – Cinsaut-led, intriguing name,b2ap3_thumbnail_WITHINGTON-Roan-Ranger-Cinsaut-Grenache-Mourvedre-2013-HR.jpg

appealing front label, and a delightful story behind the product. Happily, the wine itself lives up to every expectation, an unshowy blend of immense charm, smooth, beautifully integrated, the Cinsaut dominating while benefitting from vigorous, companionable Grenache and powerful, meaty Mourvèdre.

Charles Withington fulfilled a long-held ambition with the creation and release of this wine, one which saw his quest for the production of  a Rhone-style blend that would combine the harvest of Darling grapes that best reflect the vintage year, while introducing a sense of the communication between man and horse. His firm belief in Cinsaut goes back many years to when he worked at Rustenberg. The Withington association with, and love of, horses is a long-established one, here celebrated by naming the wine after a roan, or horse whose coat consists of more than one colour (an equine blend, suggests Withington.)

Made with immense care which shows in every sip, each of the three components were harvested and vinified separately. Malolactic fermentation took place in lightly oaked French fourth and fifth- fill barrels and the final blend selection made after one month.

Withington’s Nguni Malbec 2015is another wine that presents both a lesser-known cultivar and honours an indigenous beast and celebrates both along with Charles’ love of the Darling wine district. Most of us first encountered Malbec through the Argentinian product, and now  various New World countries are planting the grape and UK sales reveal it to be the fastest growing varietal in sales terms, Darling can boast nine hectares of Malbec, which, Withington points out is four times the national average. Grapes for the Nguni Malbec 2015 were sourced from a dryland single vineyard on Oranjefontein farm.

Charles likens the grape to the patient, tolerant Nguni cattle, which have been produced for beef in the Darling area for decades. Juicy and fruity, more than meaty, this is moreish Malbec, medium-bodied, and enjoyable solo as well as complementing good red meat (Nguni beef?)

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At R90 a bargain buy, and one that could hardly be bettered as an introduction to this dark and ancient French varietal.

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We have all savoured the quality whites from the memorable 2015 vintage. Now some fine reds are emerging to claim their place in the sun. Among the first  is this enjoyable cabernet sauvignon from Boschendal, a powerful and complex wine that is  presenting its  credentials as a Stellenbosch cab with real depth. On the nose, whiffs of berry and cedar, leading to nicely balanced tannins and dark fruit on the palate lent additional interest with  spice from the oak. It can certainly be opened and relished right now – particularly, they suggest, paired with the farm’s  Black Angus biltong – or any other cuts of their pasture-fed free-ranging herd and source of the beef in the restaurants. Alcohol levels are 14%, the cellar door price is R140 and if this wine was to spend another year or two in cool darkness, it is sure to improve even further.

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 The release of the latest vintage of Delheim Grand Reserve is an event that connoisseurs wait for and collectors snap up.

 

The 2014 vintage marks a remarkable 36 years since the cellar introduced their flagship range and celebrates its reputation for pampering some of the finest Cabernet Sauvignon in the Simonsberg sub-region. Cab makes up 85% of the Reserve, with 10% Cabernet Franc and remaining 5% of Merlot contributing to the final blend, an impressive combo of finely tuned structure and elegance.

 

 

Winemaker Altus Treurnicht harvested the estate’s five-star Cabernet grapes, added the Cab Franc from the Vaaldraai block and Merlot from Peperboom at the foot of Klapmutskop. The wine spent 16 months in French oak before being bottled but will go on getting better and better for up to another decade for those winelovers with patience and access to dark, cool places.

 

It is already more than enjoyable, delicious ruby hues offering up complex aromas of berry and spice. On the palate the tannins are robust but contained, the wine is smooth with fruit that comes to the fore in a balanced and pleasing mouthfeel and long finish.

 

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It sells for R285 from the farm and makes a fine companion to gourmet meals where red meat takes centre stage. It also makes an appetising gift for someone who will appreciate its many charms and future promise.

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It’s always a special occasion when La Motte releases a new edition of their Hanneli R, a flagship tribute to the estate owner that is only produced during exceptional harvests. As

The 2012 vintage matured in French oak for more than three years, then was cellared on the farm for a further four years before being released as it nears its peak. That said, collectors will argue that they will squirrel their case away for a further four years to demonstrate how the wine will scale ever further heights to delight connoisseurs.

The Hanneli R 2012 consists of 60% Syrah, 30% Grenache and is finished with 10% Petite Sirah. Half the Shiraz came from Franschhoek, the other half from Elim. Walker Bay supplied the Grenache and Franschhoek the Petite Sirah, a southern French cultivar that is a cross of Syrah and Peloursin that produces tannic, long-lived wines. It occupies a miniscule 0.02% of our vineyard area.

This is a wine to open with great expectations  which are sure to be met, given the talent and sources behind it. It offers  beautifully expressed complexity and is as elegant as it is excellent. First impressions are that the tannins dominate, but the fruit comes through on the palate along with welcome freshness, balanced with the richness which one expects. If there is some over, the enjoyment is likely to be increased when more glasses are poured the following day, a bonus to be appreciated.

Just 3 600 bottles were produced, which increases its appeal to those who demand the best, from the Cape, from France, or wherever the  Old or New World produces outstanding wines.

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this is a wine to grace the table when memorable events and occasions are celebrated – when the menu is geared to the wine, rather than the other way round. What better place to do this than book a table at La Motte’s delightful Pierneef restaurant and select a main course from Michelle’s menu  that will be further enhanced by this worthy wine. Now, next year or any time up to 2022 ....

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There’s just one day to go before Heritage month comes to an end, and I still have several new wines to report on that reached me before this unique trio did. But, because these are so connected to our Cape history in terms of viticulture, architecture and hospitality – not to forget the Matieland aspect -  I am breaking my self-imposed rule to write about them first, before September has past.

 

Local and international travellers everywhere rave about Lanzerac – in terms of fine fare, iconic wines, or simply as one of the most beautiful of the many historic wine estates in Stellenbosch. Its cellar has been  renowned for perennially popular rosé, for pioneer pinotage, and more recently, for fine chardonnay, among others. Now cellarmaster  Wynand Lategan is offering the world of wine a new and maiden trio entitled the  Keldermeester Versameling, and this cellarmaster’s collection introduces several innovative touches – both the minimalistic front label and more informative back label use only Afrikaans, the heavy bottles are sealed with wax in good heritage style, and the contents consists of cultivars and combinations  not commonly found today.

One gets the sense that winemaker Wynand had a good time creating these wines, limited editions,  each one of which is linked to a renowned personality and to the University of Stellenbosch.

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The single white is a 2016  Pinot Blanc sourced from a single vineyard in the Jonkershoek Valley, making it something of a rarity in itself, as this grape occupies just 0.01% of vineyard area in south Africa. Its appealing name, BERGPAD, refers to the famous mountain path from the university sports grounds at Coetzenburg toward Lanzerac. The Italian varietal produces an appealing summer wine, this one at 14% alcohol levels on the high side, but which adds body: there is a slight hint of oiliness, reminiscent of Semillon as well. I did not get tasting notes, so don’t know details of the age of the vines and other factors.  Just over 1 000 bottles were produced, selling at R190.

Wynand repeats viticultural history with his 2016 blend entitled PROF – it’s a tribute to the renowned academic Prof Abraham Perold who created Pinotage by crossing Cinsaut, then called Hermitage, with Pinot Noir back in 1925. Why, we are not sure, but today the result, along with Chenin blanc, are the two cultivars  that overseas gurus are naming as the iconic South African pair producing the most exciting and pleasing wines . Prof Perold cultivated the first Pinotage vines, but, sadly,  never tasted the maiden bottled wine. Today’s blend of 60% Cinsaut and 40% Pinot fills just more than 1 000 bottles,  and sells for R310, which is not a bad price for recreated history in a bottle.

And finally, we have DOK, a 2015 Malbec sourced from a single vineyard in the Jonkershoek valley. This diminutive term, usually of affection,  refers to a doctor and was always used back in the last century when Afrikaners were talking about legendary rugby giant Dr Danie Craven. He regularly visited Lanzerac with his dog Bliksem in tow, and I remember my mother revealing, in a rare moment about her youth, that she and he went on a couple of dates at some stage.  DOK, just over 1 000 bottles, sells at R280 from  the farm.

 

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The bottles are numbered and signed by Lategan, the stock is limited to the farm, selling from the Lanzerac tasting room, while members of the Lanzerac Wine Club also have access to this trio, which is going to make a talking point for summer affairs this festive season, and a nostalgic one for oldtimers who know and revere the historic heart of Stellenbosch. 

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As Heritage month heads to a climax with the public holiday - and a long weekend to boot – we know that millions of South Africans will be lighting braai fires across the nine provinces as the recent tradition of combining heritage with a National Braai Day as been enthusiastically adopted.

Round many a fire family, friends and cooks will be clutching glasses of good Cape wine – both to celebrate the occasion and to accompany the brunch, lunch or supper feast sizzling over the coals.

Some of our cellars have established a heritage legacy through their history, having been in existence for more than 300 years. Others have done so through their products, that have become renowned as wines with a long tradition. Nuy Winery falls into the latter class, having produced fine muscadels since their inception in 1963. Hardly a year passes without these fortified dessert wines being rated as best in the country, both white and red. Former cellarmaster Wilhelm Linde (1971 – 2003 is widely credited with being responsible for the impressive increase in quality of muscadel at Nuy, something that present cellarmaster Christo Pienaar upholds and carries forward.

This month muscadel fans can invest in a case of of Nuy muscadel wines with five year intervals between vintages from 1991 to 2016 along with a 2006 white muscadel. Only 15 of these heritage cases will be released during September, each packed in a wooden case made for the occasion. This heirloom collection costs R1500.

Meanwhile, Nuy has also been increasing its range of wines from other cultivars over the last couple of decades, and one of these, the Mastery range has acquired a sauvignon blanc 2017, just released in time for spring flings. Moderate alcohol levels at just over 13, the back label uses Afrikaans to describe the wine as presenting tropical fruit aromas followed by a combination of fruit on the palate and having a long finish. I found the nose quite shy, but the palate full and fruity with a silkiness that lingered. Mixed fruit, yes, with a little passionfruit and lime, balanced by the freshness of youth and no searing acidity.  Slips down agreeably, both as a aperitif and a companion to a range of summer fare/

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A group of us from the McGregor Heritage society recently lunched at the Nuy hilltop restaurant and I’m pleased to report it's maintaining its well-deserved reputation for both cuisine and service, although the prices have risen. (What hasn’t, I hear you mutter).

 

Earlier this year cellarmaster Christo Pienaar was elected the new chairman of the SA National Wine Show Association, replacing Charles Hopkins who retired after a five-year stint. Pienaar is well qualified to take over, and has been actively involved in the Association for more than a decade.

 

All in all Nuy’s tasting centre and bistro, with its panoramic views, provides both an outlet for some notable wines and spirits, and offers a delectable oasis in the gastronomic desert that exists on the R60 between Worcester and Rooiberg.

 

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