Allesverloren landscape

Haskell vineyards on the Helderberg.

Swartland panorama from Pulpit Rock

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Recipes

Posted by on in Reviews

A BITE OF LATIN AMERICA by Susie Chatz-Anderson. Published by Human& Rousseau, Cape Town, 2017.

b2ap3_thumbnail_CKBK-Latin-America.jpg

 

A collection delectable in every aspect, and one that fills a gap in culinary literature as well. There has been little in the way of comprehensive cookbooks covering Latin America on our bookshop shelves for years, and none, as far as I know, written by a local..

Now we have Susie’s delightful gastronimic diary , a very readable account of the year she and husband  Mike spent travelling through Mexico and South America, in a quest for the best taste trips. Or rather that’s what she wanted, while he  spent the time hunting down the best kite-surfing sites.

They resigned their office jobs, stored their possessions and bought two air tickets, waving goodbye to Susie’s mother who, we are told, feared for her daughter’s life every day!

In choosing Latin America, they embraced cuisines where Maya, Aztec, Inca, Spanish and Portuguese contributions mix and meld, followed by more recent influence from Africa, Caribbean, Asia and Europe.

Mexico was the first destination, and a good choice seeing that their fare is rated as one of the finest peasant cuisines in the world. They found more meat in the north, seafood at the coast, spicy vegetable and chicken in the south.  Favourite Mexican meals were breakfasts, which included rice, beans and avocado with their morning eggs. Her chorizo omelette is a dish that’s perfect for a winter brunch, and tortilla-wrapped fish with salsas is  an appetising informal lunch suggestion. Gorditas – corn pockets with saucy fillings – make a great alternative to pitas,  add some Margaritas and you have an easy way to feed guests.

They headed south to, Guatemala,  a country whose cuisine is not well-pubicised. Plantains, rice and beans and salads are featured, while Nicaraguan more pork chops -  well laced with rum and finished with cream and green peppercorns  - are starred along with a saucy chicken pie that looks worth a try. I also like the Atolillo, described as a chilled rum custard, and it reminds me of melktert filling garnished with boozy sultanas.

More rice with beans, this time cooked in coconut milk, from Costa Rica and a similar version, without the beans, sweetened  and spiked, for dessert. From Columbia, chilli salsas,  Spanish-style omelettes and green apple and mint lemonade. On to Ecuador, where our adventurous couple savoured prawns ceviche and a potato and peanut stew with tofu and discovered countless varieties of Andean potatoes.

The author’s description of places and people in Peru are fascinating, the cuisine – indigenous dishes of Inca origin touched by Spanish influence, equally so. Her version of Causa  Limena illustrates this well – Peruvian potato, avocado, tomato and tuna layered stack – and makes a summery lunch.  For wintry days, their vegetable and quinoa soup  makes a colourful and nutritious meal. Husband  Mike’s favourite dish was Peru’s signature beef stir-fry, Lomo Saltado.

By way of contrast, the sophistication and diversity of Brazil’s fare was absorbed and relished  with delight. Recipes include cheese bites,prawn pie,upside-down banana cake (a breakfast special)  and Caipirinha, the  country’s signature cocktail.

From their final destination, Argentina,  Susie brought home recipes for Empanadas (beef and onion pies), a leek, sage and bacon bake, layered vegetable  tart,  the famous Chimichurri salsa and the Argentinian version of Dulce de Leche, caramel which is used in cakes, puds and cookies such as Alfajores, recipe given. The recipes finish with some good coffees, followed by a detailed index. Susie’s great travel photos add much interest, while the food shots are sumptuous, and beautifully styled.

What’s really appealing is the way the author suggests substitutes for exotic ingredients and alternatives and additions to the original dishes. Just the sort of helpful advice that every cook, beginner and experienced, appreciates. That and a down-to-earth modesty, an attractive trait that is by no means guaranteed in current cookbook-cum-diaries.

Last modified on
0

Posted by on in Events

 

TRY THIS! TASTE OF TYGERVALLEY - A NORTHERN WINE FEST

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_WEBSITE-Tygerberg-tasting-event.jpg

 

 

A first for this huge and populous centre! Don't miss out on the inaugural Taste of Tygervalley Wine Fest taking place on Friday June 30 and Saturday July  1. T.he venue is the Arena, where 21 cellars will be pouring their products, from potstilled brand and fortified wines to serious reds and full-bodied whites. Something for every palate and pocket, and most suited to the midwinter weather that we are welcoming with many a toast!

The wineries taking part are Blaauwklippen, Benguela Cover, Bonnievale, Brandvlei, Diemersfontein, Eagles'

Cliff, Edgebaston, Groenland, Hermanuspietersfontein, Imbuku, Kingna Distillery, Montpellier de Tulbagh, Montagu Wine and Spirits, Mooiplaas, Ormonde, Perdeberg, Peter Bayley, Spookfontein, Triple Three Distillery, Yonder Hill and Zorgvliet.

The Cabernet Franc Interest Group will man a special tasting stand for this trendy varietal. Wine of the Month Club and Good Taste will be present, and chocolate pairings and tastings are also on the menu.

Tickets cost R100 which includes glass, tastings, and a contribution toward a bursary for a local youngter to study toward becojing a sommelier. The festival times are from 17h00 - 21h00 on Friday and 14h00 - 19h00 on the Saturday. Tickets from www.computicket.com or at the door. Numbers of guests will be limited to avoid overcrowding. 

 For more information visit www.tygervalley.co.za

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

DSTV FRANSCHHOEK BASTILLE FESTIVAL

b2ap3_thumbnail_Franschhoek-Bastille-Festival_HR-95.jpg

 

French flair to the fore, with berets, a red white and blue outfit, and an appetite for fine wine and gourmet bites? Then you are all ready for this years Bastille bash taking place on July 15 and 16.

As usual, it offers a mullti-sensory experience, and there is an optional package being offered this year dubbed Joie de Vivre: it comprises a number of mountain biking activies over three days, including Contre la Montre, a race against the clock in the Franschhoek mountains along with accommodation, exclusive functions and meals.

As before, the food & wine marquee will be sited at the Huguenot monument, where wines can be tasted and gourmet fare purchased. Tickets cost R280 a head, and include glass and five wine-tasting coupons. Book through www.webtickets. Visit www.franschhoekbastille.co.za for more info.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


FLAVOURS OF WINTER FESTIVAL AT MURATIE

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Muratie-Manor-House_20170612-155021_1.jpg

 

The beautiful historic estate of Muratie will host a celebration of Cape Port-style wines on Saturday July 29. The Melck family will welcome yhou to fireside sipping, then dining on rich flavours of warming winter fare from the Muratie Farm Kitchen. Wines on show will also be on sale at cellar door prices. Von Geusau will titillate tastebuds with their handmade chocolates.

The event runs from 10h30 to 16h00. Tickets cost R100 and include a glass. Advance booking is recommended. Email taste@muratie.co.za or call 021 865 2330.

 

 

Last modified on
Tagged in: Recipes
0

Posted by on in Events

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_White-Winter-Pearmain.JPGHeritage flavour: White Winter Pearmain

The Tru-Cape Heritage orchard on Oak Valley farm in Elgin celebrated its maiden harvest recently with an event worthy of three and half centuries of local pomology. The 20-odd trees, each a different species of heritage apple, were weighed down with red and green fruit, some bent over almost double. It seemed little short of miraculous that those slender twigs I saw planted back in November 2012 were now bearing so prolifically. Guests were invited to pick an apple of their choice - I went for Winter Pearmain - a variety I remember my mother buying when I was very small.

Back home we cut it up and relished every mouthful - sweet, crisp and presenting  wafts of apply perfume - something you don't find with contemporary apples, however beautiful they look.

Read more.

The apple orchard now has a heritage pear sapling as well - to mark the harvesting of Van Riebeecks first wijnappel in

April 1662, a Winter Saffron pear was planted, taken from the oldest pear tree south of the Sahara, still clinging to life in the Company Gardens in Cape Town - it yielded its first pear on April 19 1665.

 For keen cooks who enjoy sampling produce from the past, keep an eye and ear open in coming years - there's a reasonable chance that  we will be able to buy some of these heritage varieties when the trees get a little bigger. Slow Food members - take note!


Our splendid lunch in the Pool Room restaurant was as contemporary and delectable as any gourmet could wish for - while the apple pie, one of the desserts on offer, was made from heritage apples using an old Dutch recipe, popular at the Cape a century or more ago.  Enjoyable yes, but I much prefer my own apple streusel recipe, which beats any pie or crumble recipe tried to date. Its based on one by Robert Carrier, but is spicier.

I will post it in a separate blog.

 

 

Last modified on
Tagged in: Events Food Recipes
0